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eevBLAB 91 - Why Are Fluke Meters So EXPENSIVE?

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EEVblog:

--- Quote from: Fungus on January 13, 2022, 12:13:31 pm ---
--- Quote from: EEVblog on January 13, 2022, 06:26:48 am ---For those interested, as a large Brymen seller, there is certainly a not insignificant failure/return rate with them. I should have kept proper numbers on this, but I'd estimate a 0.1 to 0.2% failure rate. None of them have ever been reported as drifting or beign slightly out of cal, it's always some other failure mode. IIRC about three main chip failures.

--- End quote ---

Were they DOA or did they take time to fail?
PS: Do you still have the three Brymens you reviewed in video #432 ?

--- End quote ---

Most took time to fail, although there have been a couple of DOA or Dodgy On Arrival.
Should still have those meters somewhere.

GuidoK:

--- Quote from: Martin72 on January 12, 2022, 11:23:24 pm ---Did you ever give away your brymen for external calibration ?
I did, few weeks ago after buying.
They (Cal-Lab) must do some adjustments for reaching the specs although the meter was new.
At work, we got some real old fluke 87, one of them is a Fluke 87 model ONE.
It is in the calibration circle for decades and musn´t adjusted until now.
Always in it´s specs.
That separate the boys from the men.

--- End quote ---
I have my bm869s calibrated annually.
It always meets its specs, but even then, its a choice whether or not you also have it aligned.
Those are 2 different aspects.
Which model of yours had to be aligned and by how much on which value?

BTW I sometimes also doubt the calibration labs, although they are accredited by the national measuring institute and of course have very nice equipment etc etc.
There are times when I put the calibration reports next to eachother, and the first year a lot of values are adjusted upwards for a certain amont, and the next year, those same values are adjusted down with virtually the same amount that they were previously adjusted upwards. But they are small amounts, within the factory accuracy range.
Probably next year I'll try welectron. (I'm now using another lab in the netherlands.)
First investigate what exactly is the difference between a DAKKS calibration and an ISO17025 calibration....

I can imagine that a fluke might be cheaper to calibrate, as every lab can do them (they usually have both calibrators and software from fluke, and with the software some meters can virtually be calibrated automatically), and finding a lab that can do fluke's is certainly easier (however the brymen calibration protocol can be found online and any real lab should know how to use that)
However Welectron offers an iso17025 calibration for €58 ex vat. That's pretty cheap.

Martin72:

--- Quote ---Which model of yours had to be aligned and by how much on which value?
--- End quote ---

I gave my 869s back to welectron where I´ve bought it from, they´d send it away for calibration for a fixed price.
On which ranges I must have a look at the calibration report.


--- Quote ---It always meets its specs, but even then, its a choice whether or not you also have it aligned.
--- End quote ---

Sure you have the choice to let the deviation as it is - as a private person.
Me, I got no choice as they did it "automatically" - When it´s cost not more, and it didn´t cost no more, my bonus.. 8)
At work, our external calibration service handle it in another way.
They test it and when it "fails", it fails, no re-adjustments will be done.
When I buy a new meter, I expect to have it in its own specified ranges, at least for a year or longer.
Therefore it was a suprise to me, as the meter came back with the protocol and remarks.
I would expect that when buying something from Uni-T, but not from Brymen.


--- Quote ---BTW I sometimes also doubt the calibration labs, although they are accredited by the national measuring institute and of course have very nice equipment etc etc.
--- End quote ---

No need to have a doubt about it... ;)
When it´s an accredited lab, theyr calibration references are above the ISO standard vulgo Dakks, which makes sense.


--- Quote ---First investigate what exactly is the difference between a DAKKS calibration and an ISO17025 calibration....

--- End quote ---

Have fun...
The only thing I know is that it´s the worldwide reference standard, accepted from everyone including MIL purposes.



GuidoK:
So did you already take a look at the calibration report on which ranges your meter failed?

tbh I think it's strange that at your workplace they dont realign the meters if they fall out of spec.
The realignment procedure is part of the meter's featureset and supported by the manufacturer.

That said, I sometimes have my doubt at these procedures, or the capabilities of calibration labs when I see multiple times in a row that the one year the meter gets adjusted a few µV up and the next year it gets adjusted virtually the same amount of µV down again and the year following it gets adjusted up again.
And not only with meters, I also have a precision shunt from Isabellenhütte on which I have annually calibrated at 20amps and also there I see fluctuations higher than I expected. But maybe it's just me.
I plan to switch calibration labs and see if this trend continues and is normal if I can find a lab that can do both within desired parameters.

Muttley Snickers:
Free shipping!   :-DMM :o

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