Author Topic: EEVblog #1007 - Is a $25 Multimeter Any Good  (Read 94776 times)

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Offline Mr. Scram

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Re: EEVblog #1007 - Is a $25 Multimeter Any Good
« Reply #475 on: December 13, 2017, 12:33:43 pm »
The SURPEER seems to have a bargraph, something I hadn't seen yet on a cheap multimeter. Too bad it's not the prettiest.
 

Offline Specmaster

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Re: EEVblog #1007 - Is a $25 Multimeter Any Good
« Reply #476 on: December 13, 2017, 01:07:51 pm »
The SURPEER seems to have a bargraph, something I hadn't seen yet on a cheap multimeter. Too bad it's not the prettiest.
Well I think it looks OK, display seems to be nice and clear as does the range selector but I notice that its not available for shipping to the UK, why? It's not because Amazon UK have it stock because they don't even list it so what gives there then.
Who let Murphy in?
 

Online rsjsouza

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Re: EEVblog #1007 - Is a $25 Multimeter Any Good
« Reply #477 on: December 13, 2017, 04:48:30 pm »
Well, at least in the Amazon US the price buys also a "Receive 1 SURPEER Steel Stainless Coffee Grinder free when you purchase 1 or more SURPEER LCD Auto Ranging Multimeter offered by SURPEER."

For a company that "manufactures" a wide range of products from precision instrumentation equipment to coffee grinders, I think they must be the next GE!  :-DD
« Last Edit: December 21, 2017, 06:37:19 pm by rsjsouza »
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Oh, the "whys" of the datasheets... The information is there not to be an axiomatic truth, but instead each speck of data must be slowly inhaled while carefully performing a deep search inside oneself to find the true metaphysical sense...
 

Offline stach

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Re: EEVblog #1007 - Is a $25 Multimeter Any Good
« Reply #478 on: December 13, 2017, 06:06:18 pm »
I couldn't find if this link has been posted here or not, but if you want to make Ananeg (or others which use same hardware) better read this:

https://www.jackenhack.com/aneng-an8008-modify-for-better-accuracy-faster-readings/

Does make a difference ;)
 

Online amspire

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Re: EEVblog #1007 - Is a $25 Multimeter Any Good
« Reply #479 on: December 13, 2017, 11:05:58 pm »
The SURPEER seems to have a bargraph, something I hadn't seen yet on a cheap multimeter. Too bad it's not the prettiest.
Well I think it looks OK, display seems to be nice and clear as does the range selector but I notice that its not available for shipping to the UK, why? It's not because Amazon UK have it stock because they don't even list it so what gives there then.
I think the Zeast version on Aliexpress looks better and is probably cheaper for most people (see link in my previous post). Should be available to the UK.

It includes the bar graph, dual 4 1/2 digit displays and the NCV proximity voltage detection. It is an interesting meter even if the specifications may be a little optimistic.
 

Offline casinada

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Re: EEVblog #1007 - Is a $25 Multimeter Any Good
« Reply #480 on: December 21, 2017, 06:06:48 am »
I missed the opportunity of the free coffee grinder on amazon since the price went up back to $39.99 for the Surpeer AV4.
I found the Zeast 282 on ebay for $28.84:
https://www.ebay.com/itm/20000counts-Multimeter-Digital-LCD-Professional-Voltmeter-Current-Tester-RMS/372140030906?ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT&_trksid=p2060353.m1438.l2649
Will see when it shows up  :)
 

Offline BillyO

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Re: EEVblog #1007 - Is a $25 Multimeter Any Good
« Reply #481 on: January 25, 2018, 03:11:44 am »
Dave was a bit unfair to this one.  Performance wise, it literally blows the Fluke 101 away at well less than half the price.  He whined a bit much about the lack of current ranges, but ya know, I spent a few minutes looking over the Fluke 101 and couldn't find a current range at all.  How much do you have to spend on a Fluke before you get an current measurement, let alone uA and mA.  Heck, you have to go to a Fulke 115 to even get a current range, and it won't touch this.

Same quality probes, but less accessories on the Fluke.

For some dude using this in their basement with an Arduino, it is head an shoulders over anything from Fluke under $150.

I think Dave is a little split from reality.  We don't all need $2,575 multi-meters.  I'd even hazard Dave doesn't either.
 

Offline tvicol

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Re: EEVblog #1007 - Is a $25 Multimeter Any Good
« Reply #482 on: June 04, 2018, 12:31:08 pm »
My solar DMM.  8)
 

Offline floobydust

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Re: EEVblog #1007 - Is a $25 Multimeter Any Good
« Reply #483 on: June 04, 2018, 08:38:38 pm »
Dave was a bit unfair to this one.  Performance wise, it literally blows the Fluke 101 away at well less than half the price.  He whined a bit much about the lack of current ranges, but ya know, I spent a few minutes looking over the Fluke 101 and couldn't find a current range at all.  How much do you have to spend on a Fluke before you get an current measurement, let alone uA and mA.  Heck, you have to go to a Fulke 115 to even get a current range, and it won't touch this.

Same quality probes, but less accessories on the Fluke.

For some dude using this in their basement with an Arduino, it is head an shoulders over anything from Fluke under $150.

I think Dave is a little split from reality.  We don't all need $2,575 multi-meters.  I'd even hazard Dave doesn't either.

Have you ever even used a high quality multimeter?   :)

This cheap and unreliable multimeter has more digits than Fluke's low end, but, if the rotary switch isn't oxidized, it's the banana jacks or test leads making poor connections.
Popped the fuse? Toss the meter in the garbage or waste time doing mods to fit a "normal" fuse.
It's unsafe for high voltage or mains work due to the fake IEC61010 approvals.

Sure, it's OK for hobbyists and the Arduino/maker crowd.
Depending on what you value the most: resolution, accuracy, safety, reliability, cost, features etc. some people will spend more on a multimeter. Not to this crazy $2,575 level you mention.
 

Offline ebastler

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Re: EEVblog #1007 - Is a $25 Multimeter Any Good
« Reply #484 on: June 04, 2018, 09:00:50 pm »
Dave was a bit unfair to this one.  Performance wise, it literally blows the Fluke 101 away at well less than half the price.  [...]

Popped the fuse? Toss the meter in the garbage or waste time doing mods to fit a "normal" fuse.

Popped the fuse? Just leave the burned-out fuse in there, and your Aneng comes even closer to the Fluke 101!  :P
 

Online rsjsouza

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Re: EEVblog #1007 - Is a $25 Multimeter Any Good
« Reply #485 on: June 04, 2018, 09:59:54 pm »
The hobbyist working on low voltages definitely does not need an incredibly safe meter, and if the temptation to use it on a household circuit can be kept at bay, there is a very high chance the meter will survive for quite a long time. So, go for it.

Even if from time to time the meter is used around in the household (but away from the circuit breaker panel), there is an incredibly low chance the meter itself will cause personal injury - still a gamble, but incredibly low. The chances the meter will be destroyed are much higher - especially with my biggest pet peeve of the super cheap meters such as this one: the quality control. While certain meters have reasonable design and ergonomics, in my experience I have *always* found one of a few problems related to quality inside brand new meters: bits and pieces of solder or tiny metallic shards; loose springs, screws or even rotary switch leads, blobs of solder that reduce creepage distances to 1mm or less; massive amounts of flux residue with impurities that also reduce dielectric resistance. Another factor that contributes to the longevity of cheap meters is the current inputs: either unfused or merged with the V range. An inadvertent flip on the switch range is enough to short very high power lines (if used around on the outlets).

A very small probability of accidents can happen with voltage surges coming from the power lines. That is quite unusual and has unpredictable consequences, but a safer meter will have more chances of preventing the user from being harmed.

With any meter, always keep in mind that accidents happen when someone is most distracted or tired or misinformed - a gamble that has less probability of having terrible consequences if the meter is safer and better built.

The way I see these evaluations is that Dave, on his position of educating and influencing the crowds, is hard pressed to provide a verdict that is based on his own experience with several brands. If the quality is not comparable, I would want to know that his "grade" would reflect that, otherwise there would be a lack of reliance in his evaluations if the standard of a well built meter is reduced to cater to the ultra low cost audience.
Vbe - vídeo blog eletrônico http://videos.vbeletronico.com

Oh, the "whys" of the datasheets... The information is there not to be an axiomatic truth, but instead each speck of data must be slowly inhaled while carefully performing a deep search inside oneself to find the true metaphysical sense...
 

Offline Fungus

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Re: EEVblog #1007 - Is a $25 Multimeter Any Good
« Reply #486 on: June 05, 2018, 11:39:35 am »
Have you ever even used a high quality multimeter?   :)

Yes!  8)

This cheap and unreliable multimeter has more digits than Fluke's low end, but, if the rotary switch isn't oxidized, it's the banana jacks or test leads making poor connections.

Real life experience tells us that this doesn't happen as often as Fluke-owners like to think.

Secondly: If you're working with a meter every day then you'll soon know if it starts to give problems. The real problem is with cheapo borrowed meters, not the meters you own. Moral: Never use an unkown meter for critical/dangerous jobs. This applies to Flukes, too - you don't know what's inside.

If you've got two or three cheapo meters then you'll be fine for hobby work IMHO. Of course it would be nice to own three Flukes instead, no disagreement there, but that's often not realistic.

The hobbyist working on low voltages definitely does not need an incredibly safe meter, and if the temptation to use it on a household circuit can be kept at bay...

If the temptation can't be kept at bay then a Fluke 101 is a nice addition to any collection (and only costs about $45).
« Last Edit: June 05, 2018, 11:59:04 am by Fungus »
 

Offline madires

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Re: EEVblog #1007 - Is a $25 Multimeter Any Good
« Reply #487 on: June 05, 2018, 01:48:13 pm »
If you like to work on mains wiring and distribution panels get a proper tool like a Duspol (similar testers are available from Fluke). A DMM is simply the wrong tool for this kind of work.
 
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Offline Fungus

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Re: EEVblog #1007 - Is a $25 Multimeter Any Good
« Reply #488 on: June 05, 2018, 04:24:28 pm »
If you like to work on mains wiring and distribution panels get a proper tool like a Duspol (similar testers are available from Fluke). A DMM is simply the wrong tool for this kind of work.

I guess that choice depends on the ratio of mains/non-mains work.
 
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Offline madires

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Re: EEVblog #1007 - Is a $25 Multimeter Any Good
« Reply #489 on: June 05, 2018, 05:50:21 pm »
A Duspol Analog rated for CAT III 1000V and CAT IV 600V is about EUR 55, and it doesn't require you to be a mutant with three arms. It also has some nice features like LowZ, RCD check and phase detection. Since it doesn't measure current you can't forget to switch the probe leads back to the voltage input jack or cause other related disasters.
 

Offline ebastler

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Re: EEVblog #1007 - Is a $25 Multimeter Any Good
« Reply #490 on: June 05, 2018, 06:14:18 pm »
If you like to work on mains wiring and distribution panels get a proper tool like a Duspol (similar testers are available from Fluke). A DMM is simply the wrong tool for this kind of work.

I guess that choice depends on the ratio of mains/non-mains work.

No contradiction between those two statements, in my book. If you like to work on mains wiring and do so regularly, a Duspol is a good idea. If you only work on mains a couple of times per year, nothing wrong with using the trusty multimeter which you bought for your electronics projects. Provided, of course, that the meter has decent safety, and that you use it properly.
 

Online rsjsouza

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Re: EEVblog #1007 - Is a $25 Multimeter Any Good
« Reply #491 on: June 05, 2018, 06:20:07 pm »
The hobbyist working on low voltages definitely does not need an incredibly safe meter, and if the temptation to use it on a household circuit can be kept at bay...
If the temptation can't be kept at bay then a Fluke 101 is a nice addition to any collection (and only costs about $45).
Yes, that is a nice meter indeed. However, such "temptation opportunities"  8) tend to happen at the most unexpected times, when one gets the first (or the only) meter within their reach.

A Duspol Analog rated for CAT III 1000V and CAT IV 600V is about EUR 55, and it doesn't require you to be a mutant with three arms. It also has some nice features like LowZ, RCD check and phase detection. Since it doesn't measure current you can't forget to switch the probe leads back to the voltage input jack or cause other related disasters.
These testers are really nice. For a casual hobbyist, though, it is hard to justify the cost - after all, much more capable gear can be had for a fraction.

The grandpa of these testers:  :-DD
Vbe - vídeo blog eletrônico http://videos.vbeletronico.com

Oh, the "whys" of the datasheets... The information is there not to be an axiomatic truth, but instead each speck of data must be slowly inhaled while carefully performing a deep search inside oneself to find the true metaphysical sense...
 

Offline Fungus

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Re: EEVblog #1007 - Is a $25 Multimeter Any Good
« Reply #492 on: June 05, 2018, 06:28:08 pm »
If you like to work on mains wiring and do so regularly, a Duspol is a good idea. If you only work on mains a couple of times per year, nothing wrong with using the trusty multimeter which you bought for your electronics projects. Provided, of course, that the meter has decent safety, and that you use it properly.

QFT.
 

Offline Muttley Snickers

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Re: EEVblog #1007 - Is a $25 Multimeter Any Good
« Reply #493 on: July 20, 2018, 02:42:38 am »
For those in Australia interested Aldi have another multimeter and some other stuff on offer this coming Saturday, the meter is $20 and appears to be a Holdpeak 39B with a large 2000 count display according to the specifications. Anyway, it looks to be an improvement and slightly cheaper than the previous thing they had on offer and Banggood currently have them listed for around $26, as with any Aldi purchase always keep your receipt.

I don’t think anyone could take something back to Aldi based on the “not as described” consumer law because they are as vague as mud when it comes to product descriptions and information, perhaps this is a ploy to get customers into the store to find out what the hell the product actually is or does. I shouldn’t criticise them really as they do keep the other major players on their toes in regards to competition and pricing.

Aldi Special Products.   ::)
https://www.aldi.com.au/en/special-buys/special-buys-sat-21-july/

HoldPeak Meters.   :o
http://www.holdpeak.com/Product/plist/id/114/one/1/two/1.html
 

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