Author Topic: EEVblog #1090 - Sony Mystery Teardown  (Read 2102 times)

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EEVblog #1090 - Sony Mystery Teardown
« on: May 30, 2018, 10:13:19 pm »
What is this mystery bit of Sony equipment?
It's probably not what you think...
A look at an obscure bit of niche industry gear.

 

Offline NiHaoMike

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Re: EEVblog #1090 - Sony Mystery Teardown
« Reply #1 on: May 31, 2018, 03:02:13 am »
I remember DAT tapes back in the day. One of those could store 24GB or so, quite a marvel at the time.
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Offline orion242

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Re: EEVblog #1090 - Sony Mystery Teardown
« Reply #2 on: May 31, 2018, 03:12:16 am »
Never saw something like that in my field.  Circular chart recorders on the other hand used to be very common and they held on forever.
 

Offline STMartin

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Re: EEVblog #1090 - Sony Mystery Teardown
« Reply #3 on: May 31, 2018, 04:01:28 am »
We have those rotary recorders at work all over the place; although I'm too young to have actually seen them in use.

Nowadays we've got a bunch of these Flukes: https://us.flukecal.com/products/data-acquisition-and-test-equipment/data-acquisition/2680-series-data-acquisition-systems?quicktabs_product_details=0

120 channels of whatever signals you want. Not sure about the bandwidth though.
 

Offline AndyC_772

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Re: EEVblog #1090 - Sony Mystery Teardown
« Reply #4 on: May 31, 2018, 10:05:10 am »
I remember DAT tapes back in the day. One of those could store 24GB or so, quite a marvel at the time.

That machine supports DDS-2 which is 4.0 GB; the mechanism looks exactly like the one in an early model SDT-7200 DDS drive.

Random fact: the same physical mechanism, with a different head drum, was used in the PCM-7040 studio recorder, and the PCM-E7700 editing machine.

Offline FrankBuss

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Re: EEVblog #1090 - Sony Mystery Teardown
« Reply #5 on: May 31, 2018, 01:35:07 pm »
I know it is too expensive if you have to ask for the price, but how expensive is it, $10k, $20k or more? Looks like all the companies who sells items like this has a form for asking for the price. Why don't they just publish a price list?
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Offline jonovid

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Re: EEVblog #1090 - Sony Mystery Teardown
« Reply #6 on: May 31, 2018, 02:25:59 pm »
 :-+  you need a HD video endoscope Dave! - just a suggestion  ;)
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Offline thm_w

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Re: EEVblog #1090 - Sony Mystery Teardown
« Reply #7 on: May 31, 2018, 08:00:21 pm »
We have those rotary recorders at work all over the place; although I'm too young to have actually seen them in use.

Nowadays we've got a bunch of these Flukes: https://us.flukecal.com/products/data-acquisition-and-test-equipment/data-acquisition/2680-series-data-acquisition-systems?quicktabs_product_details=0

120 channels of whatever signals you want. Not sure about the bandwidth though.

18-bit 143 readings/s
16-bit 1,000 readings/s

So quite a bit slower, sort of a different market.

Quote
Measurement speed (2680A-FAI)    
Slow:    45 (50 Hz), 54 (60 Hz) readings/second nominal
Medium:    200 readings/second nominal
Fast:    1000 readings/second nominal (5 readings/second for VAC nominal, 370 readings/second on 300 Ω range, 44 readings/second on 3 MΩ range)
 


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