Author Topic: EEVblog #1095 #1096 - ANENG Q1 Multimeter  (Read 9380 times)

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Offline Dave

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Re: EEVblog #1095 #1096 - ANENG Q1 Multimeter
« Reply #25 on: June 14, 2018, 10:22:26 pm »
You called the fuses inside the meter HRC. They look like regular ceramic body fuses to me, not likely to survive a couple of kA fault currents through them. Do they advertise them as HRC? :-//
<fellbuendel> it's arduino, you're not supposed to know anything about what you're doing
<fellbuendel> if you knew, you wouldn't be using it
 

Online Fungus

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Re: EEVblog #1095 #1096 - ANENG Q1 Multimeter
« Reply #26 on: June 15, 2018, 09:54:39 am »
You called the fuses inside the meter HRC. They look like regular ceramic body fuses to me, not likely to survive a couple of kA fault currents through them. Do they advertise them as HRC? :-//

"High" is a relative term but I thought all ceramic fuses were "HRC" type.

(otherwise they'd use glass, which is cheaper)

Edit: Make that "most". You'd have to be a total cheapskate not to put some sand in them but it has been known to happen. The point is that they don't need to be fluke-size to be HRC, ceramic fuses with sand in them can be small.

Before replying, think: This guy might point at your puny "couple of kA" fuses and laugh...  :popcorn:



(If you think that's big, you should see his multimeter!)

Edit: There's a video of him blowing it. It's only a 35A fuse.  :o




How does a fuse like that make sense? Surely you'd want bolts to attach a fuse that big, not a spring clip fuse holder.
« Last Edit: June 15, 2018, 01:49:21 pm by Fungus »
 
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Online GeorgeOfTheJungle

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Re: EEVblog #1095 #1096 - ANENG Q1 Multimeter
« Reply #27 on: June 15, 2018, 10:05:14 am »
Do you have any Batteroos with contacts still attached to them? How about a real-life test?

Maybe two wrongs can make a right?  :popcorn:


Lol, yes, funnily enough this is the perfect target for a batterizer.
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Online MasterTech

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Re: EEVblog #1095 #1096 - ANENG Q1 Multimeter
« Reply #28 on: June 15, 2018, 11:38:12 am »
The ICL8069 reference shows as discontinued in many websites. Where do they source them from? I’ve seen them selling as lots on ebay too....
 

Online Fungus

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Re: EEVblog #1095 #1096 - ANENG Q1 Multimeter
« Reply #29 on: June 15, 2018, 11:44:33 am »
The ICL8069 reference shows as discontinued in many websites. Where do they source them from? I’ve seen them selling as lots on ebay too....

I'm sure they still make clones in China.
 

Offline joeqsmith

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Re: EEVblog #1095 #1096 - ANENG Q1 Multimeter
« Reply #30 on: June 15, 2018, 11:46:24 am »
You called the fuses inside the meter HRC. They look like regular ceramic body fuses to me, not likely to survive a couple of kA fault currents through them. Do they advertise them as HRC? :-//
"High" is a relative term but I thought all ceramic fuses were "HRC" type.

(otherwise they'd use glass, which is cheaper)
As I have mentioned to you before, they very well could be ceramic body non-HRC fuse.    Dave would have had to take one apart to know for sure if they were at least filled. 

Cracking open a ceramic fuse
https://youtu.be/TSGLA9heboY?t=292

Breaking the ceramic with a small transient
https://youtu.be/fG61v8UgzA8?t=386
How electrically robust is your meter?? https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCsK99WXk9VhcghnAauTBsbg
 

Online GeorgeOfTheJungle

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Re: EEVblog #1095 #1096 - ANENG Q1 Multimeter
« Reply #31 on: June 15, 2018, 01:22:14 pm »
Sush...  He is still in denial that he needs glasses.

 :-DD Welcome to the fifties Mr. Jones.
« Last Edit: June 15, 2018, 08:47:19 pm by GeorgeOfTheJungle »
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Online Fungus

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Re: EEVblog #1095 #1096 - ANENG Q1 Multimeter
« Reply #32 on: June 15, 2018, 01:34:54 pm »
As I have mentioned to you before, they very well could be ceramic body non-HRC fuse.

I remember that.

I'd insert something like "mass produced 6x25 HRC fuses are very common, there's really no need to be so cheap as to not put sand in them in a $40 meter" but I know you too well for that.

Dave would have had to take one apart to know for sure if they were at least filled. 

It's the only way to be 100% sure.
« Last Edit: June 15, 2018, 01:56:36 pm by Fungus »
 

Offline joeqsmith

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Re: EEVblog #1095 #1096 - ANENG Q1 Multimeter
« Reply #33 on: June 15, 2018, 04:42:50 pm »
For the fuses and other choices, I would assume its to maximize their profits.   

What do a few drops of gasoline do the screen?  Melt like the other ANENGs? 
How electrically robust is your meter?? https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCsK99WXk9VhcghnAauTBsbg
 

Offline PeterL

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Re: EEVblog #1095 #1096 - ANENG Q1 Multimeter
« Reply #34 on: June 15, 2018, 09:19:59 pm »
@Dave: You zoomed right in on the voltage reference and still didn't notice/comment on how ridiculously bad the soldering was on that part?

For probably the 10th time now I've had to comment on this:

This is common for hand soldered through hole parts, the solder didn't flow through from the bottom. It's not generally a problem, just inconsistency in the hand soldering. The bottom was soldered fine.
Well I guess there are two ways to look at this. Electrically it's fine the way it is. But I was taught that IEC standards dictate that on a metallized through hole solder joint the solder has to be visible on both sides of the PCB. I can try to look it up next week.

And all-though I'm no expert at this, I can imagine that a joint like this will give extra stress on the thin metallisation of the hole due to heat and vibration. And it certainly helps against cracked solder joints to have the solder all the way through.
 

Offline Doctorandus_P

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Re: EEVblog #1095 #1096 - ANENG Q1 Multimeter
« Reply #35 on: June 16, 2018, 02:08:20 am »
Adding insult to injury for this meter, the "bargraph" only seems to have 20 segments, with 5 stripes/segment, but it is hard to know for sure from Dave's video, by lack of a suitable input signal.

I really do like the push button idea, but pushing a button 5x to rotate between functions makes it a lot less appealing.
The always on backlight, especially in combination with the fading display as soon as the batteries start to loose some charge make this meter a complete lemon.

It might be usable if the polarizer can be easily reversed and the backlight disabled, but why bother?

I do like the AN8009 though, very similar to the AN8008, but with N.C.V instead of the pulse output and it has temperature measurement (only 1deg. Celcius resolution, even though this meter can has a 1uV resolution and has plenty of room for at least an extra digit for temperature. (K thermocouple = 41mV/C.)).
The gap in the Current ranges can be solved relatively easy by using a 1 Ohm external shunt, which fits nicely with the 1uV resolution :)
For Electronics use I actually prefer the external shunt, because you can just leave it in the circuit and use the multimeter for other measurements without interrupting the Current.
 

Online Fungus

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Re: EEVblog #1095 #1096 - ANENG Q1 Multimeter
« Reply #36 on: June 16, 2018, 09:03:22 am »
Adding insult to injury for this meter, the "bargraph" only seems to have 20 segments, with 5 stripes/segment, but it is hard to know for sure from Dave's video, by lack of a suitable input signal.

Yep. I'm disappointed Dave didn't connect a potentiometer to it and give it a workout.

I guess it doesn't matter though, there's plenty of other reasons not to buy one.

 

Offline nixfu

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Re: EEVblog #1095 #1096 - ANENG Q1 Multimeter
« Reply #37 on: June 26, 2018, 08:19:47 pm »
So we are gonna really milk the whole "NOW IN 4K FOUR KAY FOUR KAY!!!!" thing are we!?
 

Offline yo55

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Re: EEVblog #1095 #1096 - ANENG Q1 Multimeter
« Reply #38 on: June 13, 2020, 06:05:47 pm »
Hi everyone,

Electronics newbie here. At 14:00 https://youtu.be/HmkIPkXpg9U?t=840, the meter reads 0.707V for 1Vrms/3khz on the generator but reads 1V at 1 khz. What am I missing about that TRUE-rms jazz ? Cheers  ;)
 

Online Fungus

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Re: EEVblog #1095 #1096 - ANENG Q1 Multimeter
« Reply #39 on: June 13, 2020, 06:28:04 pm »
Electronics newbie here. At 14:00 https://youtu.be/HmkIPkXpg9U?t=840, the meter reads 0.707V for 1Vrms/3khz on the generator but reads 1V at 1 khz. What am I missing about that TRUE-rms jazz ? Cheers  ;)

Multimeters have limited bandwidth, just like oscilloscopes.

The bandwidth figure is the point where it reads 0.707 volts (-3dB), eg. A "100Mhz" oscilloscope will read 0.707 volts if you feed it a 100Mhz sine wave (many will go a little bit higher than their quoted number in practice).

If you need a multimeter that measures higher frequencies then you look for that number in the specification. eg. The Brymen 869s claims 100kHz bandwidth:

https://brymen.eu/shop/bm869s/

If a multimeter doesn't publish this number then you can assume it's only good for 1kHz or less and you. Some will only be TRMS at mains AC frequencies.

 

Online tunk

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Re: EEVblog #1095 #1096 - ANENG Q1 Multimeter
« Reply #40 on: June 13, 2020, 09:51:08 pm »
The voltage of the signal generator is the amplitude (or peak) and the
multimeter measures the RMS voltage. To find the RMS value of a sine
wave you have to divide by the square root of two:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Root_mean_square

Edit: not sure if the bandwidth for a multimeter is defined as -3dB,
e.g. this is the specification for a Fluke 101:
AC Volts: 40 Hz to 500 Hz, 1.0 % + 3
« Last Edit: June 13, 2020, 11:06:40 pm by tunk »
 

Offline yo55

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Re: EEVblog #1095 #1096 - ANENG Q1 Multimeter
« Reply #41 on: June 17, 2020, 10:58:30 am »
Thanks for your answers guys   :-+. I didn't think it was a bandwith issue. I'll keep an eye out for this particular spec for my next meter.

I just bought the KUMAN WH5000A wich is supposed to go up to 400Hz for AC measurement. It isn't the best designed meter ever but I am still amazed you can get all those functionalities for that price (28 € here in France through amazon). That wouldn't have happened 20 years ago. Cheers.
 


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