Author Topic: EEVblog #1314 - Ultrasound Machine Teardown!  (Read 1458 times)

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Offline EEVblog

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EEVblog #1314 - Ultrasound Machine Teardown!
« on: June 23, 2020, 02:05:27 pm »
Complete teardown of an ATL/Philips HDI 3000 ultrasound machine.

 
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Offline MrMobodies

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Re: EEVblog #1314 - Ultrasound Machine Teardown!
« Reply #1 on: June 24, 2020, 02:07:09 am »
In 20:36 in the video I noticed the hardrive was an IBM oem model DNES-309170 manufacturer January 2000 and I remember reading about them having high failure rates at around that time. I wonder if the software error had anything to do with that hard drive. Also I see date marks of 1996 and 1997 on the metal sheilding cover (that didn't have much underneath) so I wonder if that was some replacement drive.
 
Not a Deskstar/Deathstar but according this:

http://datacent.com/datarecovery/hdd/ibm/DNES-309170W
Quote
IBM DNES-309170W Data Recovery Information

These are some real problems experienced by DNES-309170W and IBM hard drives in general that we see in our lab. We are not affiliated in any way with hard drive manufacturers. All the information below is based solely on our experience and we do not make any claims regarding reliability of the specific model. We see mostly failed drives in our lab and therefore we don't have complete statistics.

IBM(later Hitachi) is widely known in data recovery business for their line of DeskStar HDDs also known as DeathStars. These hard drives, mostly DTLA and AVER families, became infamous for their reportedly high failure rates. It is believed their problems were mainly connected with glass platters - new technology introduced by IBM in these hard drives. After some time magnetic layer started to fall off the platters creating dust inside the HDA(Head Disk Assembly) that led to massive head crashes and large number of bad sectors making the data inaccessible.

Apart from this IBM used soldering alloy of poor quality and had deficient PCB layout that caused looseness in contacts between the PCB and HDA that in turn led to firmware corruption. If you attempt to boot up from such drive or read any data from it you would get "Primary Master Hard Disk Fail" or "Operating system not found" or "USB Device malfunctioned" error or "S.M.A.R.T. Capable But Command Failed" or some other hard drive error on boot. It's critical at this point to stop any manipulations with the hard drive and send it for evaluation to our lab. Any further attempts to read these areas would shorten the drive's life and may result in further unrecoverable data loss.

That model had overheating problems.
« Last Edit: June 24, 2020, 02:27:36 am by MrMobodies »
 

Offline Haenk

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Re: EEVblog #1314 - Ultrasound Machine Teardown!
« Reply #2 on: June 24, 2020, 09:03:28 am »
No wonder these machines were expensive. I would have expected far less technology, even in the 90s (there were some Media-Chips from Philips for Settop-Boxes that should have been able to provide a lot of the functions like OSD, video handling etc.) .
 

Online Berni

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Re: EEVblog #1314 - Ultrasound Machine Teardown!
« Reply #3 on: June 24, 2020, 09:26:18 am »
Now this was a proper teardown!

Its truly amazing how much circuitry was used to do all of this. Just imagine the number of man hours taken to design all of it. I would imagine a modern ultrasound machine can do all of it on one pair of analog and digital boards and just send it into a standard PC.
 

Offline aargee

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Re: EEVblog #1314 - Ultrasound Machine Teardown!
« Reply #4 on: June 25, 2020, 01:06:38 am »
Ha.. my job. I was an ATL service engineer. Know these systems intimately!
This was a water damaged system by the looks of it.
The 'filters' on the right at rear are two ferro-resonant isolation transformers, the big one for the system and the smaller one for peripherals. Pain in the arse to replace.
ADAPTR handled Doppler mostly.

Pretty much on the money for most of the description. :-)

Not easy, not hard, just need to be incentivised.
 
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Offline EEVblog

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Re: EEVblog #1314 - Ultrasound Machine Teardown!
« Reply #5 on: June 25, 2020, 01:21:49 am »
Its truly amazing how much circuitry was used to do all of this. Just imagine the number of man hours taken to design all of it.

Yep, it's a huge effort. Graduate engineers these days think all the cool jobs are at Tesla and SpaceX, but, well, ok, they be cool, but seriously system engineering is done in countless other industries like this.
 
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Offline aargee

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Re: EEVblog #1314 - Ultrasound Machine Teardown!
« Reply #6 on: June 25, 2020, 01:49:00 am »
Most of the hardware you see there is now done in software. Essentially a high-speed ADC feeding a PC now days (simplistically).
The meaty engineering stuff has now passed into history for this application.
The power requirements have dropped significantly, you can get a transducer terminated in a USB-C or micro-USB that plugs into a tablet and the Ultrasound is an app.
https://www.philips.com.au/healthcare/sites/lumify

Not easy, not hard, just need to be incentivised.
 

Offline SilverSolder

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Re: EEVblog #1314 - Ultrasound Machine Teardown!
« Reply #7 on: June 25, 2020, 03:52:16 am »
Most of the hardware you see there is now done in software. Essentially a high-speed ADC feeding a PC now days (simplistically).
The meaty engineering stuff has now passed into history for this application.
The power requirements have dropped significantly, you can get a transducer terminated in a USB-C or micro-USB that plugs into a tablet and the Ultrasound is an app.
https://www.philips.com.au/healthcare/sites/lumify

The youngsters just have it too easy!  :D
 

Offline whollender

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Re: EEVblog #1314 - Ultrasound Machine Teardown!
« Reply #8 on: June 25, 2020, 09:44:59 pm »
AMIS at 43:37 is AMI Semiconductor.  They were bought out by ON Semi in 2008.  I think that ASICs still make up a lot of ON's business.

I interned for a small design group in Montana shortly after they were bought out that did custom dataconverter ASICs. 
 

Offline JustMeHere

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Re: EEVblog #1314 - Ultrasound Machine Teardown!
« Reply #9 on: June 25, 2020, 10:11:12 pm »
This and the previous main channel video haven't shown up on the eevblog.com page.  I keep missing new content because that's where I look.
 

Offline thm_w

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Re: EEVblog #1314 - Ultrasound Machine Teardown!
« Reply #10 on: June 25, 2020, 11:52:39 pm »
This and the previous main channel video haven't shown up on the eevblog.com page.  I keep missing new content because that's where I look.

https://www.youtube.com/feed/subscriptions
 

Offline MrMobodies

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Re: EEVblog #1314 - Ultrasound Machine Teardown!
« Reply #11 on: June 27, 2020, 09:09:15 pm »
Now this was a proper teardown!

Its truly amazing how much circuitry was used to do all of this. Just imagine the number of man hours taken to design all of it. I would imagine a modern ultrasound machine can do all of it on one pair of analog and digital boards and just send it into a standard PC.

It reminds me a bit of that emergency video conferencing teardown EEVblog #1289 - Mystery Huawei Teardown.
 

Offline Warhawk

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Re: EEVblog #1314 - Ultrasound Machine Teardown!
« Reply #12 on: June 30, 2020, 08:53:20 pm »
Its truly amazing how much circuitry was used to do all of this. Just imagine the number of man hours taken to design all of it.

Yep, it's a huge effort. Graduate engineers these days think all the cool jobs are at Tesla and SpaceX, but, well, ok, they be cool, but seriously system engineering is done in countless other industries like this.

Golden medal for saying this. Thanks for reminding me that I am not that young anymore.


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