Author Topic: EEVblog #1335 - Miniware $70 DT71 LCR Tweezer REVIEW  (Read 3325 times)

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Offline Kleinstein

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Re: EEVblog #1335 - Miniware $70 DT71 LCR Tweezer REVIEW
« Reply #25 on: September 11, 2020, 05:21:09 pm »
With SMD parts it is sometimes difficult to tell if a part is an inductor or resistor. So it makes sense to have at least a crude way to measure inductance.
 

Offline SilverSolder

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Re: EEVblog #1335 - Miniware $70 DT71 LCR Tweezer REVIEW
« Reply #26 on: September 11, 2020, 07:54:50 pm »
With SMD parts it is sometimes difficult to tell if a part is an inductor or resistor. So it makes sense to have at least a crude way to measure inductance.

Agree, full LCR capability and ability to give ESR of capacitors makes a "real" LCR tweezer a great troubleshooting tool.  However, these devices are not yet totally convincing - tiny screens, deep single click menus, rechargeable, expensive - all factors that I dislike.

So I just ordered a $19 Uni-T UT116A tweezer because I think it will be "good enough for Australia" in 95% of my use cases, for very little money, with a large screen (that can be twisted relative to the tweezers!), using AAA batteries (not Duracell obviously! :D ), and usable-looking controls.   It obviously has limitations - and there is only one way to find out how much they matter!  :D

« Last Edit: September 11, 2020, 08:03:40 pm by SilverSolder »
 

Offline thm_w

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Re: EEVblog #1335 - Miniware $70 DT71 LCR Tweezer REVIEW
« Reply #27 on: September 11, 2020, 08:38:25 pm »
UT116 does have a 3V diode test and 21V zener test mode, which is really nice (not bidirectional). Many DMMs do not have this ability.

I don't understand the UT116C though, it has higher resolution, but less features.. what? But its cheaper ($14): https://www.aliexpress.com/item/10000342672956.html
« Last Edit: September 11, 2020, 08:44:47 pm by thm_w »
 

Offline SilverSolder

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Re: EEVblog #1335 - Miniware $70 DT71 LCR Tweezer REVIEW
« Reply #28 on: September 11, 2020, 09:30:44 pm »
UT116 does have a 3V diode test and 21V zener test mode, which is really nice (not bidirectional). Many DMMs do not have this ability.

The high voltage zener mode can probably light up most LEDs, even blue ones.

I noticed that the tweezers have a big + and - on them, so you can at least see what it is doing.  (And the head can be twisted in relation to the tweezer, so you can see the screen measuring either way...)

Quote
I don't understand the UT116C though, it has higher resolution, but less features.. what? But its cheaper ($14): https://www.aliexpress.com/item/10000342672956.html

Yes, LOL, why bother making two models that are this close, instead of one model with the features of both??

To my mind, detecting the component type is a primary benefit of these kinds of tweezers so I really don't understand why that was left out of 116C...   a plausible theory might be that the C model is intrinsically slower due to the higher resolution, which would make auto scan too painfully slow to use - perhaps a better chip was out of the question for BOM cost reasons - so that's how we ended where we are, with two separate models, trading off resolution for auto scan?

 
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Offline Microcheap

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Re: EEVblog #1335 - Miniware $70 DT71 LCR Tweezer REVIEW
« Reply #29 on: September 12, 2020, 12:07:21 am »
UT116 does have a 3V diode test and 21V zener test mode, which is really nice (not bidirectional). Many DMMs do not have this ability.
The high voltage zener mode can probably light up most LEDs, even blue ones.

It certainly can, I have a HoldPeak HP-4070C SMD tweezers that is very similar to the UT116, although you can't rotate its head and it doesn't have the +/- signs on the tweezers but I easily fixed that with a marker.

It can identify zener diodes up to 24V. When measuring battery voltage, the tweezers will apply a 10mA load so you have a better idea if the battery still good or not.

[attach=1]

[attach=2]
 
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Offline BU508A

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Re: EEVblog #1335 - Miniware $70 DT71 LCR Tweezer REVIEW
« Reply #30 on: September 12, 2020, 08:06:24 am »
I do like the idea with that 1kHz sine generator. It could be used as a signal tracer for repairing audio amplifiers.
“Chaos is found in greatest abundance wherever order is being sought. It always defeats order, because it is better organized.”            - Terry Pratchett -
 

Online firewalker

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Re: EEVblog #1335 - Miniware $70 DT71 LCR Tweezer REVIEW
« Reply #31 on: September 12, 2020, 10:20:40 am »
Someone should use Madires code on this device.

https://www.eevblog.com/forum/testgear/$20-lcr-esr-transistor-checker-project/

Become a realist, stay a dreamer.

 

Offline TheNewLab

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Re: EEVblog #1335 - Miniware $70 DT71 LCR Tweezer REVIEW
« Reply #32 on: September 14, 2020, 10:09:06 am »
Global specialty LCR-58 $90 (no LED test): https://www.tequipment.net/Global-Specialties/LCR-58/LCR-Meters/

I already have one of those on order, only just discovered it while editing this video.

The Global specialty LCR-58 really look like the Mastech MS8911 (same buttons, same functionalities), but the later one is around 48$  :o

Not to be confused with the MS8910 that look the same. The MS8911 is a full LCR meter with testing frequency from 100Hz to 10kHz with secondary parameters.



Yes, I got the Mastech years ago. Paid around $35 then. It's fun, played with it and used it a little. Haven't seen the Video yet, but this was my first thought. No Lith-ion battery, Larger and "Mastech green", but i imagine its pretty similar. Similar issues on accuracy, and since I am left handed, trying to read the LCD screen is a nightmare. It is designed to be used in your right hand.  LOL
 

Offline Doctorandus_P

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Re: EEVblog #1335 - Miniware $70 DT71 LCR Tweezer REVIEW
« Reply #33 on: September 14, 2020, 11:10:13 am »
So the battery life of this thing is ... 2 weeks?
I also find the user interface impossible to use with a single button for everything.

The tweezer part does look nice mechanically, but the very small display which turns upside down too easily, single button,

Several years ago I bought a Mastech MS8910 and I do not use it much, but it's still running on it's first CR2032.

The tweezers on this Mastech are a bit flimsy, and you have to flatten and bend them parallel to each other before the thing is usable, but then it works quite good. It also comes in a sturdy plastic box which prevents the tweezers points from getting damaged from moving about in a parts bin.

I do not really care for accuracy of tweezers like this. As long as it can reliably distinguish components upto E24 I'm happy.
Current price seems to be around EUR 20.
 

Offline SilverSolder

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Re: EEVblog #1335 - Miniware $70 DT71 LCR Tweezer REVIEW
« Reply #34 on: September 14, 2020, 04:14:15 pm »
So the battery life of this thing is ... 2 weeks?
I also find the user interface impossible to use with a single button for everything.

The tweezer part does look nice mechanically, but the very small display which turns upside down too easily, single button,

Several years ago I bought a Mastech MS8910 and I do not use it much, but it's still running on it's first CR2032.

The tweezers on this Mastech are a bit flimsy, and you have to flatten and bend them parallel to each other before the thing is usable, but then it works quite good. It also comes in a sturdy plastic box which prevents the tweezers points from getting damaged from moving about in a parts bin.

I do not really care for accuracy of tweezers like this. As long as it can reliably distinguish components upto E24 I'm happy.
Current price seems to be around EUR 20.

High accuracy is an awesome bonus feature, but the essentials are:
  1) Accessible pricing.  No more than $30 for an entry level model.
  2) Usably sharp/nice tweezers, mechanically
  3) Good sized screen visible from all angles.
  4) Twisting the head is essential if the tweezers are polarized and nice if not (right/left hand, or just convenience)
  5) Must have all the buttons that are needed, and no more (and no less!)

If all the basics are there, I might be persuaded to cough up a bit more for additional features like higher accuracy, WiFi connectivity to a PC (not bluetooth!), and so on.
 
 

Offline ober

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Re: EEVblog #1335 - Miniware $70 DT71 LCR Tweezer REVIEW
« Reply #35 on: September 15, 2020, 05:09:48 am »
Quote
When measuring battery voltage, the tweezers will apply a 10mA load so you have a better idea if the battery still good or not.

Little known fact: If you swap the polarity, it does *not* apply the 10 mA load, so you can get a quick check for whether the load makes a difference.

I keep an HP-4070C ($17 shipped, or a HP-990C, which is yellow but otherwise identical, $15 shipped) around at every desk.  I think I use those more than any other multimeter.  Doesn't do L, as mentioned. 

I also have an MS-8911 handy (~ $50, harder to find but worth it), which can measure at 0.1 V (i.e., does not turn on silicon), so it is more useful in circuit, and measures ESR, but is pure LCR (no LED, battery, ... checks). 

Finally, a DE-5000 (~ $100) for when I value precision over convenience. 
(I also have one of the original Bob Parker ESR meters; those were the days.)

Oh, and a couple $7 transistor testers (both the 9 V naked ones, which I also use to build some special-purpose test rigs from, and the "LCR-TC1" cased version with Li-Ion battery, $13 shipped).

Not really useful once you have one of the HP-nnnC tweezers: MS-8910.

Looking forward to finding out how the DT71 will fit into this mix... 
But did the scope image really show a 30 V peak-peak waveform?
 
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Offline ober

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Re: EEVblog #1335 - Miniware $70 DT71 LCR Tweezer REVIEW
« Reply #36 on: October 01, 2020, 10:48:36 am »
Looking forward to finding out how the DT71 will fit into this mix... 

Oh.  That thing is fiddly.  It is nearly impossible to not press the touch button when wrestling with a device and trying to put the tweezers into the right place...  and before you know, you are putting 1 V rms from the signal generator into the device... or activate the calibration function...

Manual says: "Note: Maximum absolute input voltage: -5V ~ 50V; Input resistance: 1MΩ."

So if you want to measure those 12 V and happen to have your tweezer legs rotated wrong, the unit is toast?
 

Offline SilverSolder

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Re: EEVblog #1335 - Miniware $70 DT71 LCR Tweezer REVIEW
« Reply #37 on: October 01, 2020, 02:23:43 pm »
Looking forward to finding out how the DT71 will fit into this mix... 

Oh.  That thing is fiddly.  It is nearly impossible to not press the touch button when wrestling with a device and trying to put the tweezers into the right place...  and before you know, you are putting 1 V rms from the signal generator into the device... or activate the calibration function...

Manual says: "Note: Maximum absolute input voltage: -5V ~ 50V; Input resistance: 1MΩ."

So if you want to measure those 12 V and happen to have your tweezer legs rotated wrong, the unit is toast?

I generally dislike touch controls.   Just because I touch something doesn't mean I want to activate it!  :D
 


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