Author Topic: EEVblog #1339 - Looking at an Electric Bus  (Read 1729 times)

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Offline EEVblog

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EEVblog #1339 - Looking at an Electric Bus
« on: September 29, 2020, 01:42:06 pm »
Dave visits Transit Systems to take a look at a fully electric bus with a 328kWh battery back running on regular Sydney bus routes. How does it compare to an electric car?
https://www.transitsystems.com.au/electric-buses



Full Video on EEVdiscover:
 
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Offline ndp

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Re: EEVblog #1339 - Looking at an Electric Bus
« Reply #1 on: September 30, 2020, 09:44:22 am »
Pretty cool.

The fire departments around me (California Bay Area) had been showing this electric fire engine off as a potential buy. I think they decided against it because the amount of time you can run it purely on battery is relatively low before a diesel generator kicks in, as well as it being a lot smaller than a traditional fire engine here in the states (less storage space for hose, water, equipment, etc.)

https://innovation.rosenbauer.com/en/concept-fire-truck/
 

Online Miyuki

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Re: EEVblog #1339 - Looking at an Electric Bus
« Reply #2 on: September 30, 2020, 12:16:15 pm »
This is also interesting alternative
They are testing it here in Prague

It have just a "small" 47 kWh LTO battery
And use overhead charging at end stations and power on steep hills
So no need to have cables on roads and huge batteries in buses

 
« Last Edit: September 30, 2020, 12:17:59 pm by Miyuki »
 

Offline GoneTomorrow

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Re: EEVblog #1339 - Looking at an Electric Bus
« Reply #3 on: October 01, 2020, 09:00:42 am »
We've had a small fleet of BEV busses doing the rounds in Christchurch NZ for a bit over a year too. Bit more loud and proud with the branding though. 25 more due next year.

Pretty much 100% of the electricity in the South Island comes from hydro so there's really quite an impact switching from diesel.

« Last Edit: October 01, 2020, 09:02:31 am by GoneTomorrow »
 

Offline Orips

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Re: EEVblog #1339 - Looking at an Electric Bus
« Reply #4 on: October 02, 2020, 12:56:06 am »
Posted this in the Youtube comments but thought it might get more interest here. Definitely worth watching. Sydney trialed an electric bus 40 years ago! Check out this episode of Torque - an 80s Australian motoring TV show hosted by Peter Wherrett https://youtu.be/PZdTJ2oUQS4?t=901

If this was a printed article dated 2020 you wouldn't suspect if was really from the early 80s - same concerns about pollution in the cities, battery charging/swapping and bureaucratic BS.
 

Offline Rerouter

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Re: EEVblog #1339 - Looking at an Electric Bus
« Reply #5 on: October 02, 2020, 11:14:38 am »
I oversee analytics on a few of these buses, the BYD model on sloped but mostly flat areas was averaging very consistently around 85 KWh per 100KM for average speeds around 30kmph (city traffic),

Attached is some of the raw data if anyone is curious, sadly pulling the slope data for the trips would be dipping a tad too far into revealing who owns them.

I have no clue where they pull the fraction of a cent per KM number from, based on even large scale rates, at 0.85KWh per KM, your still going to be paying multiple cents per km,

Standard buses end up around 33 Litres per 100KM of diesel for equivalent sized buses, Hybrids about 26. so 0.26 to 0.33 Liters per KM, Liquid fuels cost more, that is a given, but the gap is narrower than some would say.
 
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Offline GoneTomorrow

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Re: EEVblog #1339 - Looking at an Electric Bus
« Reply #6 on: October 02, 2020, 12:22:47 pm »
Looking at the context of the 0.01c/km statement, seems like he might just be referring to maintenance and repair costs. Sure he did say operating cost, but immediately before and after he was talking about repairs. Given that they're under warranty currently, that number will go up significantly once they're out of warranty and start to get a bit tired.
 

Offline VK3DRB

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Re: EEVblog #1339 - Looking at an Electric Bus
« Reply #7 on: October 10, 2020, 12:06:44 pm »
The no-pollution stuff is a bit of a fudge. The amount of pollution to produce a new car is significant, whether it be electric or combustion engine. There should be incentives for people with money NOT to buy a new car, except maybe to change to an electric vehicle. Where I live most people buy a new car to save face - this consumerist mentality does nothing for our planet.

There is plenty of lithium around - for now. The lithium raw material in a Li-ion battery is less than 1% of the battery cost. A $10,000 battery for a plug-in hybrid contains less than $100 worth of lithium. Rather than worrying about a lack of lithium, there could be shortages of rare earth materials, should the EV replace the conventional car. One such material is the permanent magnet for the electric motors. Permanent magnets make one of the most energy-efficient motors. China controls about 95 percent of the global market for rare earth metals and expects to use most of these resources for its own production. Export of rare earth materials is tightly controlled by the Chinese Communist Party. So where does Tesla get its rare earth magnets from?
 

Offline NiHaoMike

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Re: EEVblog #1339 - Looking at an Electric Bus
« Reply #8 on: October 11, 2020, 01:40:12 pm »
Perfectly good cars usually aren't discarded, rather they're resold and continue to be used until they're no longer economical to keep running. I do think they should require all new cars to get at least 35 MPG or so highway, to at least partially offset the environmental impact of manufacturing.

Tesla has been using induction motors in the Model S, which do not use permanent magnets. They could easily go back to that if it ends up more economic.
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Offline Circlotron

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Re: EEVblog #1339 - Looking at an Electric Bus
« Reply #9 on: October 25, 2020, 11:16:04 am »
With those big batteries on the roof, I wonder if they have done a crash test going under a low bridge? 

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