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EEVblog 1610 - Deye Hybrid Solar Inverter

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Brumby:


Well, an effort was made.

Maybe consider acquiring a borescope camera...?

Kleinstein:
With the panels oriented east / west there is a good chance that one would not get the full nominal power anyway. So the panels may well be OK from the size.

Brumby:
If things come down to a warranty claim, I can imagine the real, on-site physical realities may not play as important a part as the simple numbers on paper would.

Whether or not you would do this, let's look at the following hypothetical... 

* Say you were wanting up to 8kW of solar power on the best, sunniest day possible but, due to circumstance, you had to install a string of solar panels rated for a maximum of 12kW to achieve that. 

* Then say you had a piece of attached equipment rated for 10kW which failed.The numbers on the specification sheets would depict a clear mismatch - so what would you expect the result of a warranty claim to be?

As an extension to this question, let's say you have run this system for 4 years covering some extreme examples of high insolation and your history shows the maximum instantaneous power generated at ANY point was 8.2kW.  What then would the answer to the warranty claim?


Edit: Maybe I'm just getting cynical, but when it comes to warranty matters, my life experience has taught me to be very mindful and tread carefully.

EEVblog:

--- Quote from: Kleinstein on April 13, 2024, 02:34:38 pm ---With the panels oriented east / west there is a good chance that one would not get the full nominal power anyway. So the panels may well be OK from the size.

--- End quote ---

For a good part of the day, yes. But my roof is fairly shallow pitch, so in summer there is going to be pretty close to full power on both arrays for a good part of the day.
Better to be safe than sorry.
And the two spare 440W panels I can mount elsewhere and have the DC cables come down direct so I can play with various microinverters and other products. e.g. I could hook them up to my Hoymiles microinverter mounted on the wall and connect into the Generator input of the Deye for extra potential battery charging.

EEVblog:

--- Quote from: Brumby on April 14, 2024, 12:59:27 am ---If things come down to a warranty claim, I can imagine the real, on-site physical realities may not play as important a part as the simple numbers on paper would.

Whether or not you would do this, let's look at the following hypothetical... 

* Say you were wanting up to 8kW of solar power on the best, sunniest day possible but, due to circumstance, you had to install a string of solar panels rated for a maximum of 12kW to achieve that. 

* Then say you had a piece of attached equipment rated for 10kW which failed.The numbers on the specification sheets would depict a clear mismatch - so what would you expect the result of a warranty claim to be?

As an extension to this question, let's say you have run this system for 4 years covering some extreme examples of high insolation and your history shows the maximum instantaneous power generated at ANY point was 8.2kW.  What then would the answer to the warranty claim?

Edit: Maybe I'm just getting cynical, but when it comes to warranty matters, my life experience has taught me to be very mindful and tread carefully.

--- End quote ---

I'd say there would be some buffer built into that MAX string rating for this very reason. e.g. panels can actually give out more than their rated label power on a high solar insolation day.
But if you installed a system with a panel label capacity greater than the max, they'd have every excuse to not honor any warranty IMO.

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