Author Topic: EEVBLOG #166 - HP E3610A  (Read 12556 times)

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Offline Frangible

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EEVBLOG #166 - HP E3610A
« on: April 21, 2011, 03:29:23 am »
I'm wondering if running that supply's transformer on 50Hz vs. the 60Hz it was designed for causes much of a problem.  I was always under the impression that 50Hz transformer cores were bigger than the equivalent 60Hz core, and therefore didn't saturate as easily when run on 60Hz.  60Hz cores on the other hand did when run on 50Hz.
 

Online EEVblog

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Re: EEVBLOG #166 - HP E3610A
« Reply #1 on: April 21, 2011, 05:47:24 am »
This one is rated for operation from IIRC 47Hz to 60Hz+
(sticker on the back)

Dave.
 

Offline metalphreak

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Re: EEVBLOG #166 - HP E3610A
« Reply #2 on: April 21, 2011, 10:20:22 am »
Someone has a 230V transformer for sale on ebay although I'm not sure if its worth the cost of postage to buy it.

Offline mikeselectricstuff

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Re: EEVBLOG #166 - HP E3610A
« Reply #3 on: April 21, 2011, 11:15:24 am »
A cheap way to convert 110 to 220v or vice versa is to get a dual-primary (110/220) mains transformer of suitable size and use the primary as an autotransformer.
An easy way to judge power rating is to use a transformer of similar or larger size to that used in the equipment being converted.
Youtube channel:Taking wierd stuff apart. Very apart.
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Offline Richard W.

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Re: EEVBLOG #166 - HP E3610A
« Reply #4 on: April 21, 2011, 04:58:55 pm »
I got the same power supply. (Opt. 03 of course  :P )
It is worth every penny.

Here you can find the service manual with all schematics and part-lists:
 http://www.physics.fsu.edu/users/Wahl/labmanuals/instruments/ps/AgilentE361xAManual.pdf



 
 

Offline Delekhan

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Re: EEVBLOG #166 - HP E3610A
« Reply #5 on: April 21, 2011, 05:42:56 pm »
Great video, but I wonder how you got the working footage of the PSU. You got another one or are you using an external 240/110 transformer? Anyways, I think it is a kind of bad product design where you can not change the voltage. Even my dad's old 80s power amplifier got an external voltage switch.

Now to my real question: At ~10:04 in the video I noticed the C20 tantalum capacitor. Is that thing blown or not? Cause the casing looks quite unfamiliar/broken to me.

--Markus
 

Offline tnt

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Re: EEVBLOG #166 - HP E3610A
« Reply #6 on: April 21, 2011, 06:02:18 pm »
* He used an external transformer. (it's mentionned around 2:15)
* The cap looks fine ... looks like a normal ceramic one (PTH) with a bit of black paint on the top (quite common AFAIK).
 

Offline Zad

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Re: EEVBLOG #166 - HP E3610A
« Reply #7 on: April 21, 2011, 08:47:13 pm »
I wonder if you could run a transformer like that in series with a capacitor. It might correct the inductive power factor too. One alternative would be a 240 to 20V SMPSU, but I guess that would defeat the point of running a linear PSU.

Offline logictom

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Re: EEVBLOG #166 - HP E3610A
« Reply #8 on: April 22, 2011, 06:56:37 pm »
Under what conditions would you / should you connect the ground to earth?
 

Offline Russel

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Re: EEVBLOG #166 - HP E3610A
« Reply #9 on: April 22, 2011, 07:06:13 pm »
Looking at the specification sheet from Agilent, it appears that there are three power input versions.

100Vac Option OE9
115Vac OEM or Standard
230Vac OE3

I'm wondering where the 100Vac version required.
 

Offline Richard W.

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Re: EEVBLOG #166 - HP E3610A
« Reply #10 on: April 22, 2011, 07:23:20 pm »
Japan has a 100Vac mains.
 

Online vk6zgo

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Re: EEVBLOG #166 - HP E3610A
« Reply #11 on: April 25, 2011, 06:41:02 am »
Using an external transformer in  "bucking" mode , has all the problems of a normal stepdown transformer,but none of the

advantages.

You could fit another transformer,but it would mean a fair bit of butchery,as dear old HP have the secondary connected straight

into the PCB.

I like HP gear when its working,but they do some weird things.  I have a function generator with a faulty PSU,where they used a 3

layer board--no reason why,they just felt like it!!

The upshot is that a quite simple fix becomes difficult to perform.


In one of their Noise & distortion test sets quite some time back,they fitted a mains fuse holder that shorted on an internal

partition. The easy fix was to glue a piece of perspex on the partitition,which we did,but not HP!

The thing was a pig anyway,as it had automatic nulling which took forever!

VK6ZGO
 
 

Offline tnt

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Re: EEVBLOG #166 - HP E3610A
« Reply #12 on: July 30, 2012, 07:51:27 pm »
I know this topic is fairly old, but I just opened by E3630A to recalibrate the voltmeter (which was a few hundred milllivolts out) and inside I found  that it has a 100/115/240V switch :)



I thought it was worth mentioning because it's a nice triple output supply.

 

Offline elCap

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Re: EEVBLOG #166 - HP E3610A
« Reply #13 on: July 31, 2012, 01:00:36 am »
Same for E3615A  (Single output supply 0-20V, 0-3A).

I know this topic is fairly old, but I just opened by E3630A to recalibrate the voltmeter (which was a few hundred milllivolts out) and inside I found  that it has a 100/115/240V switch :)



I thought it was worth mentioning because it's a nice triple output supply.
 

Offline bluey

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Re: EEVBLOG #166 - HP E3610A
« Reply #14 on: November 04, 2017, 11:12:04 pm »
I far as I can find in the manuals so far:
* 60W power supplies (2000 Agilent E3614A, E3615A, E3616A, E3617A) show the on board jumper switch for line voltage selection.
* 30W power supplies (1999 HP E3610A, E3611A, E3612A) do not show on board jumper switch.

1999 on have KR----- serial numbers for made in Korea.

 


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