Author Topic: EEVblog #178 - Agilent's U1272A response  (Read 18382 times)

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Offline saturation

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Re: EEVblog #178 - Agilent's U1272A response
« Reply #25 on: June 16, 2011, 01:18:54 pm »
Its important for sellers to listen to their customers and its certainly a point to add when buying a product.

However, on the 1272a issue, the firmware issues were very many and the unit is nearly unusable as far as measurement goes. Giving users a free USB cable so they can download and do the upgrades themselves is an excellent solution, not because of altruism or wishing to please customers, but the labor and costs to take returns of entire DMMs to fulfill their warranty obligation and ship updated ones back to owners would far exceed what the cable is worth or the cost to mail it to afflicted owners.

Further, if more bugs are found on this DMM [ or Agilent is anticipating more can exist between now and 11/2011 when the offer expires], the owners can continue to update it themselves.


« Last Edit: June 16, 2011, 01:25:17 pm by saturation »
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Offline Kiriakos-GR

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Re: EEVblog #178 - Agilent's U1272A response
« Reply #26 on: June 16, 2011, 02:40:01 pm »
The essence of the EEVblog #178, is what Dave had collect or receive as responses to his own video blogs,
and those responses are information collected from past 17-18 months until today.
And this is the most fresh sum of responses up to date.

Every freelancer or company that acts a buyer, has his own experiences,
and most of the times those experiences had to do mostly with the quality of service,
that any one receives in his own geographical location.

If I had to make my mind about Fluke, by evaluating the behavior of the local Greek dealer,
I would had to say or conclude that is a terrible company..  

In addition to the responses collected by Dave, I added my own too.
And every one is welcome to act alike, if he has some solid evidence as proof, so to prove his own honesty.
This called as useful and informative conversation.

Personally I do not form an opinion by just reading speculations, that they do not come with solid evidence.

And about Agilent I do not believe that the U1272A had enough time in the market,
so to make large scale sales.
And this concludes that every new buyer will have nothing to worry about the first signs of instability,
that the first firmware was hiding in it.

But lets return to what we have today,
and those are the good news, that there is out there companies ready to assist us if we need any assistance.

By looking forward I would say, that there is time for all those companies to change or improve their behavior or response time.
And at the new sum of Dave at 2012, they will be included too in it.   

Agilent took the lead in this race of 2011, because they came with solutions two times in the roll,
and this is not a coincidence, its a proof.  
Simple as that.

And finally about speaking for business,
Fluke will get my business if they drop down the price of their thermal imager device by minus 80%.  

« Last Edit: June 16, 2011, 02:48:04 pm by Kiriakos-GR »
 

Alex

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Re: EEVblog #178 - Agilent's U1272A response
« Reply #27 on: June 16, 2011, 08:22:11 pm »
I will add my thoughts and very limited experience on this matter to this thread.

About companies getting closer to the customer, yes, that is the direction 'they would like' to follow. It is the hot topic across high level management and academia at the moment. They are very well aware that the customers are more demanding (to the point of taking something for granted they knew it existed only 10 minutes ago) and that they talk to eachother and thousands of other customers. They are also aware that customers is what keeps them going and all companies want what is beneficial for them. Social media and replying to customers' complaints are just a drop in the ocean of 'the tools' of what is termed Customer Relationship Management (CRM). I would encourage you to read more on this if you would like to understand the principles companies are 'trying' to apply. Those claiming to have such a good grasp on the subject as to reject everything companies are doing towards those principles, and making their own suggestions instead, are grossly confused.

Another point I want to make is one that I feel is completely ignored, and that is that companies are formed by a collection of people; they are not a single person. I am sure you all know how different a person can be from another, even twins can be like day and night. It is the same in companies across departments, geo locations even across desks. Choosing to reject a company (the collection of people) and to tell thousands of others to do the same solely from your one or two bad experiences is ignorant, revengeful and unfair in the same way you would be wrong to take one or two samples as the true value of a measured quantity; there is simply too much noise in your measurement. Let me break this down further.

By flaming a company like Fluke or Agilent or any other company for this matter simply because you (or several others) had a (or many) bad experience with them only shows your ungratefulness towards everything they are doing right. This is especially true if you are clueless and just complain because it is a hot topic. Agilent, Fluke and a million others are innovating every day taking the whole industry forward with great products. Take the Fluke 233. What lead Fluke invest R&D funds in a wireless display DMM? Who co-invented the optical mouse and implemented optical continuity indication on the U1272A? Agilent did. They thought there was a market need as spoken by their customers that they do listen. I hear you say, this guy is off-topic. I am actually very on topic because I see many have succumbed to the tempation to treat a company as a single person and judge them based on your very limited experience. I understand that it is beneficial for some people to 'be loud', but for the majority it is unjustified.

I have had an excellent experience with Fluke changing the screen of a Fluke 289 for free. They also put fresh batteries and calibrated it for free when they were not obligated to do so. I found a bug in their new online service request/booking system and they fixed it. So why do we have very good but also very bad experiences with companies? Well, it is because a company is not a single person. The CEO of Microchip might have had a good game of golf, the value of the customer might cross his mind and he may decide to give you a call for a chat. Does that make Microchip a 'good' company? No, that makes the CEO, at that specific point in time under the specific circumstances a 'good' guy. Fluke gives away calibrations for free, is Fluke a good company? No, whoever decided to give me a free calibration is a good guy. Fluke did not shield the 87V against strong radiation from a mobile after the issue was discovered? It is the decision of only a handful of people in Fluke, not Fluke the company (this is also debatable from a technical point of view). But these guys are working for their companies and they are supposed to 'represent' the company, right? Yes, the 'core values' and strategy mentioned earlier. Companies try hard to 'harmonise' employee behaviour, attitudes etc (internal marketing and human resources management) but this is the true nature of the problem they are having and that it results in us perceiving a different Fluke, a different Agilent, a different Toyota every time we contact them: you simply can't flip a switch and force all people to act according to the 'core values' or the CRM principles; a baby crying all night will have an impact on your patience in the morning.

So how can we tell who is treating us, the customers, better? The way we can judge a company's customer behaviour is by our collective experiences with them. Forums and communities do help. I am proposing the following system.

You think Fluke or Agilent treated you wrongly? Cast your vote and tell other people on places like this forum. If you heard about the issue but have not contacted the company yet, you are not allowed to cast a vote as you have not interacted with the company. You think the company treated you well? Don't forget to cast your vote - we tend to take companies treating us well for granted and make a fuss when this is not the case. The more votes collected, the less noise will be in the measurement and we can begin to see which company is, as a company, doing better. You think the U1272A and all other Agilent DMMs are great and you are thinking of casting a vote for Agilent? Don't. Perception of product quality is a different beast.

This is unbiased as every vote is equally important, there are many votes to see the bigger picture and only accounts for valid customer-company interactions. Many of us are contacting these companies every now and then so the results will converge fast. Only then we are in a position to say who is doing better in terms of customer interations. Judging by isolated cases is bullshit, to be honest, fair and scientific.

So let the haters hate and come forward with some HTML code to do this. Your work will be a dream come true for these companies and an EEVBlog first. We are waiting.


Alex
« Last Edit: June 16, 2011, 08:24:51 pm by Alex »
 

Offline Kiriakos-GR

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Re: EEVblog #178 - Agilent's U1272A response
« Reply #28 on: June 16, 2011, 10:36:26 pm »
1) Customer Relationship Management (CRM)
2)Judging by isolated cases is bullshit, to be honest, fair and scientific.
3)Perception of product quality is a different beast

I will choose just those few, so to say a word about them.

1) As freelancer you do not need any special CRM studies,
so to act with a positive manner to your customer.
And no I do not need to understand the principles that companies are 'trying' to apply.
As long they answer my emails and solves the what ever problem, in those one or two times,
that I will even need them.

2) Every customer is an isolated case, but the question is : are your an cooperative customer ? so to cooperate with you ?
When I had to send the 87V back to Fluke, the person who I was communicating with, asked me if I had another DMM so to work with,
just because he asked that , even if I had the awareness that his was thousands of kilometers away, and probably he could not do anything about it,
I had feel good that he asked an such a question.
Is this another trick written in the CRM books? I do not know.
But my vote goes for to simple and practical cooperation's.
 
3)Perception of product quality
Thankfully I can form an opinion because I am capable,
I am very proud for my self , because I can do that,
and I am not aware even today of how it feels like of be upset because of your regrets for your choices.
I can not say the same about my own life, but this is another story.  :)

And as last I will say that by my book, any hype about companies and models, gets erased in three years time, from the day that it gets born.
There is no connection at all with the Fluke 87V and any older 87 model.
The Fluke 87V Its another technology, If I could calibrate it with printed manual of 1989,
I would feel confident that it does have an shiny history behind it.
But it does not, and it must to be tested in time, like every other product, yellow or orange or red. ( I hate Green )  :)
And because I live in my time that is the 2011, I care for everything that is fresh enough,
like products or opinions.
And so speak up do not hold anything in you .  ;)
  

 

Alex

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Re: EEVblog #178 - Agilent's U1272A response
« Reply #29 on: June 16, 2011, 11:17:06 pm »
Quote
As freelancer you do not need any special CRM studies,
so to act with a positive manner to your customer.
And no I do not need to understand the principles that companies are 'trying' to apply.
As long they answer my emails and solves the what ever problem, in those one or two times,
that I will even need them.

Absolutely, but Fluke/Agilent and the like are hardly freelancers. They can't control everything that is happening in the company when Kyriakos calls :-)

Quote
2) Every customer is an isolated case, but the question is : are your an cooperative customer ? so to cooperate with you ?
When I had to send the 87V back to Fluke, the person who I was communicating with, asked me if I had another DMM so to work with,
just because he asked that , even if I had the awareness that his was thousands of kilometers away, and probably he could not do anything about it,
I had feel good that he asked an such a question.
Is this another trick written in the CRM books? I do not know.
But my vote goes for to simple and practical cooperation's.

No, it isn't. This is an implementation of one of the principles, to make the customer feel he has the attention of the company. It's up the company to decide how they will actually do it, although guidelines exist. The person that answered, as I am sure you know, has been told to say this. But someone else put this measure in place and someone else thought about it etc. Glad to see it worked and you are happy, maybe they could have send you a replacement from a local depot if you said you cant work. My vote to simple and honest communications too, but I might be angry one day and I might not feel like cooperating. Many opinions is key, I mean, how many units of a specific model were sold in 2010?

Quote
And as last I will say that by my book, any hype about companies and models, gets erased in three years time, from the day that it gets born.

You are right, the hype does, but the company is not left in the same state.
 

Uncle Vernon

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Re: EEVblog #178 - Agilent's U1272A response
« Reply #30 on: June 16, 2011, 11:36:01 pm »
There is no connection at all with the Fluke 87V and any older 87 model.
The Fluke 87V Its another technology, If I could calibrate it with printed manual of 1989,
I would feel confident that it does have an shiny history behind it.
But it does not, and it must to be tested in time, like every other product,

That is not correct, while the underlying technology of 87V varies considerably from previous models there are  many aspect of the design that draw from the prior linage. 87 series has built a long standing reputation as a reputable quality product. Is Ferrari's reputation and product or brand value erased and started fresh with each new model? No! Same applies to Fluke and Agilent.  If I'd independently developed an exact quality equivalent of the 87V and released it to market without the Fluke 87 series reputation I'd be lucky to achieve 1% of the sales penetration this model has already achieved.

Reputations are long built and go a lot further than specification sheets or current model performance. The entire package the services offered, the response to market and the product itself all determine the success and reputation.

To get somewhere back to the threads topic, Agilent have gained themselves some real credibility with their response to their own stuff-up of releasing a problematic product to market. They have made a positive out of what could have been a very negative situation for them and have probably gained more cred than if they had simply had a good product hit market without issue.

In comparison Fluke has failed to gain any advantage from a broadly similar set of events, their "secret manufacturers business" doing nothing to address market perceptions and leaving their customers to simply speculate an outcome.

Both the Fluke and the Agilent are top notch and well supported products worthy of continued consideration. The recent issues we have seen with both marques being proof positive that shit happens. I don't see anything that should absolutely preclude consideration of either product. Unpatched I would have thought twice about the Agilent, but Agilents efforts to resolve the problem allay any fears I may have had.

I really hope Agilent continues stirring the marketplace with some healthy competition there is room enough for both players.
 

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Re: EEVblog #178 - Agilent's U1272A response
« Reply #31 on: June 17, 2011, 01:06:03 am »
Well, no surprise really, Fluke have responded.
I just got a call from them and they have not only fixed the GSM problem (official explanation, they found a few RF sensitive components), but a new revision board is being tested as we speak.
I'll hope to have a lot more on this a later date...

So although they didn't get back to us on the progress, they have been head down bum up fixing it. Good to see!

Dave.
 

Alex

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Re: EEVblog #178 - Agilent's U1272A response
« Reply #32 on: June 17, 2011, 01:09:39 am »
Excellent. It will be interesting to see how they will decide to roll out the new hardware revision.

Alex
 

Offline Bored@Work

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Re: EEVblog #178 - Agilent's U1272A response
« Reply #33 on: June 17, 2011, 06:34:51 am »
By flaming a company like Fluke or Agilent or any other company for this matter simply because you (or several others) had a (or many) bad experience with them only shows your ungratefulness towards everything they are doing right.

Cry me a river.

Companies are not people. As such they have no right to receive gratefulness. Companies are commercial entities to make money. They are not entities doing me a favor and they don't exist for doing favors. An essential point in capitalism is that everyone takes care of himself the best he can. If everyone takes care of himself you get strong market participants, and as such a strong market. And the market it the holly cow of capitalism, the market sorts out everything.

Customers have long been denied a strong market participation. The ones most eager to deny customers their position were, drum role, companies, with the help of the politicians they bought. Customers were dumbed down to consumers. So much for being grateful.

Companies wanted, did, and still do try to dictate the rules of the game. In their favor of course. This has partly changed with the Internet. Deep in their heard companies are pissed that it just got a little bit harder to get customer's money. And that is their only motivation to do the social media thing.

It is not about being nice. Companies aren't social welfare. They aren't interested in the advancement of sciences as such, in bringing the industry forward, or helping society. They are just interested in making money.

People, like you, who tell me I need to be grateful towards a company are also trying to deny me a strong market position as a customer, and essentially do the work of the company.

Quote
Agilent, Fluke and a million others are innovating every day taking the whole industry forward with great products.

They are not interested in taking the industry forward. They are interested in making money. It is called capitalism. Having to make products is an unpleasent side effect of them wanting to make money. Having to deal with customers is maybe the most unpleasant side effect of their desire to make money. Trust me, they would drop making products at a wimp and stop talking to customers if they figured out how to make the same money without having to develop, build market and ship products.

When HP figured there was more money to make in selling printer ink (more expensive then gold), they got one step closer to the idea of having to deliver nothing but still making a load of money. So they got rid of the test and measurement parts (now Agilent), at a wimp. Agilent will do similar should they manage to find a similar magic trick in their realm.

Quote
Take the Fluke 233. What lead Fluke invest R&D funds in a wireless display DMM?

Then investment was a business decision. If we invest in R&D now we will have a product or products in the future that make us money. Companies keep R&D departments not for the advancement of scientist or society, but because it is part of their system to make money.

Quote
I hear you say, this guy is off-topic. I am actually very on topic because I see many have succumbed to the tempation to treat a company as a single person and judge them based on your very limited experience. I understand that it is beneficial for some people to 'be loud', but for the majority it is unjustified.

You are in fact off-topic. Companies are not persons. Companies are commercial entities. I, as a customer, fulfill an important role in capitalism, to demand the most from them in every way I can. It is not my problem if this is inconvenient for them. I actively fulfill my role in the system by highlighting issues they failed at.

Unjustified? No. It is the company's job to highlight what they do right. That part is in no way my job. Why should I weaken my own market position by doing the work of the company, even for free?

The whole thing is not about being fair. Fairness has no place in capitalism. Therefore there is no reason to try to be fair to companies according to your suggestion. Companies aren't fair to you. Why on earth do you want to be fair to them? A dream to become true? Oh yes, for the companies. You are suggesting nothing else than playing by the companies' tunes to help them make more money. Sorry, not my job.

« Last Edit: June 17, 2011, 06:40:16 am by BoredAtWork »
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Offline pmrlondon

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Re: EEVblog #178 - Agilent's U1272A response
« Reply #34 on: June 17, 2011, 10:37:19 am »
Well, no surprise really, Fluke have responded.
I just got a call from them and they have not only fixed the GSM problem (official explanation, they found a few RF sensitive components), but a new revision board is being tested as we speak.
I'll hope to have a lot more on this a later date...

So although they didn't get back to us on the progress, they have been head down bum up fixing it. Good to see!

Dave.

A reasonable, if not much above average, response - don't get me wrong, I wouldn't reject Fluke that easily, but they (proper) never were that high on my list - for the price point there are other good meters available. Gossen score highly with me, due to being European, but they are also rather expensive. Megger, of course, have British heritage, but often the features can be beaten for the price point.

I'd still be more inclined towards Agilent, but the most impressive feature I have observed on the EEVblog is only available on a certain Gossen meter anyway.
 

Offline saturation

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Re: EEVblog #178 - Agilent's U1272A response
« Reply #35 on: June 17, 2011, 02:06:45 pm »
This is good news, finding and redesigning hardware is more involved than a firmware upgrade, so its no wonder it took a while.  A lot still has to be done, but its good to know steps to a recovery are ongoing.

Well, no surprise really, Fluke have responded.
I just got a call from them and they have not only fixed the GSM problem (official explanation, they found a few RF sensitive components), but a new revision board is being tested as we speak.
I'll hope to have a lot more on this a later date...

So although they didn't get back to us on the progress, they have been head down bum up fixing it. Good to see!

Dave.
Best Wishes,

 Saturation
 

Offline Kiriakos-GR

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Re: EEVblog #178 - Agilent's U1272A response
« Reply #36 on: June 17, 2011, 03:54:36 pm »
Well, no surprise really, Fluke have responded.

Dave.

Your guess is wrong, I just shoot my foot by mistake from the excitement, that this surprise caused to me.  :D :D :D
 

Alex

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Re: EEVblog #178 - Agilent's U1272A response
« Reply #37 on: June 17, 2011, 04:34:59 pm »
Hi BoredAtWork, I feel we don't contradict eachother so, without making any new points, let me attempt to further clarify some parts of my post base on yoru reply.
Quote
Companies are not people. As such they have no right to receive gratefulness. Companies are commercial entities to make money. They are not entities doing me a favor and they don't exist for doing favors. An essential point in capitalism is that everyone takes care of himself the best he can. If everyone takes care of himself you get strong market participants, and as such a strong market. And the market it the holly cow of capitalism, the market sorts out everything.

Companies are commercial entities that exist as a collection of people possibly sharing similar ideas and resources, with an ultimate objective of profit. My point was not companies not being commercial entities, it was about them being a collection of people/stakeholders and as such there is great variation of attitudes within a company.

Quote
Customers have long been denied a strong market participation. The ones most eager to deny customers their position were, drum role, companies, with the help of the politicians they bought. Customers were dumbed down to consumers. So much for being grateful.

The main focus of businesses has changed several types over the 20th century (more on ref 1 and 2). From the beginning of the 20th century and until the late 1920’s businesses were production-oriented. The aim then was to manage production cost in an effort to minimise it and obtain cost leadership as a core competency. Furthermore, the value of a business was taken to arise from the installed capacity and fixed assets of the company.
Following the production-focused era, was the sales-oriented business until the early 1950’s. During that period businesses were focused on short-term returns from ‘one-off’ transactions with customers. What is more, marketing tactics such as door-to-door sales force were introduced in an attempt to force customers into buying the products by leaving them no choice.
Subsequently and until the late 1990s, executives and academics found that the original ‘4-Ps’ of marketing – Product, Place, Price, Promotion – that were introduced in the United States towards the end of the sales-oriented era, were inadequate, especially for services based companies (more on ref 1). An era centred on marketing began with the focus moving towards the needs of the customer. Marketing was adopted on a strategy level and market analysis was used to anticipate the needs of the customers and develop a proactive strategy in an attempt to meet those needs efficiently and effectively.
Nowadays, relationship marketing puts the customer in the centre of the business strategy. The customer, or whoever is involved in the purchasing process, is now treated as a long-term investment rather than someone to have a single transaction with. Relationship marketing aims to create and maintain a ‘profitable bond’ between the company, its products and the customers. The focus is no longer only the product and its features, but the entire purchasing experience.

That is not to say that there is genuine care for the customer/consumer. They still want to make profit, but the methods are changing. We are not saying contradicting things.

Quote
It is not about being nice. Companies aren't social welfare. They aren't interested in the advancement of sciences as such, in bringing the industry forward, or helping society. They are just interested in making money.

That is not what I meant, you misunderstood. What I meant was, by staying competitive with new products and services (for profit) they take the industry forward.

Quote
People, like you, who tell me I need to be grateful towards a company are also trying to deny me a strong market position as a customer, and essentially do the work of the company.

That was not my point. My point was not to jump into conclusions without forming, and seeing, the bigger picture first. Providing positive feedback for the things companies get right, you help them know what you want and subsequently hot to make profit from you. It is a win-win, you make them work for you essentially and at the end everyone is happy. But as I said above, you can’t generalise based on only a few incidents.

Quote
Having to make products is an unpleasant side effect of them wanting to make more money.

Well, they need to offer something in return for the money they get, and products are usually fulfilling a need of the customer needs so offering products is a good idea. Yes, there are individuals within a company that consider customers as puppets (and many times they are right), but if you say that nobody in the company wants to make products you are ignoring all the design engineers (a tiny example) that get a kick from it. That is inline with one of my previous points, sometimes you need to break down a company into departments or even individuals before you can make a judgement.

Quote
Then investment was a business decision. If we invest in R&D now we will have a product or products in the future that make us money. Companies keep R&D departments not for the advancement of scientist or society, but because it is part of their system to make money.

Yes, of course it was, and we agree it was to make a profit. But how they can ensure they will make a profit? By listening to what the customer needs (or made to what they are made to think they need).
Quote
It is the company's job to highlight what they do right. That part is in no way my job. Why should I weaken my own market position by doing the work of the company, even for free?

Yes, they do highlight what the think they did right. But sales is not a perfect measure of performance for a product so it is also your job to let them know so that they keep on doing something that pleases you. You will come back to you for their next product because you offer that market response insight they need, cheaply. By opening a communication channel you are actually strengthening your position.

Quote
The whole thing is not about being fair. Fairness has no place in capitalism. Therefore there is no reason to try to be fair to companies according to your suggestion. Companies aren't fair to you. Why on earth do you want to be fair to them? A dream to become true? Oh yes, for the companies. You are suggesting nothing else than playing by the companies' tunes to help them make more money. Sorry, not my job.

Not to be fair to the company. but to the rest of the people in the company that implemented the features you like. Thats what I meant and said about being fair.

If you want to practise what you preach about companies, then sell the equipment from companies that have disappointed you on some occasion in the past and also equipment from companies that dissapointed someone else online and never buy from them again. Otherwise you are not being honest to yourself.
 

Alex

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Re: EEVblog #178 - Agilent's U1272A response
« Reply #38 on: June 17, 2011, 09:01:14 pm »
Your guess is wrong, I just shoot my foot by mistake from the excitement, that this surprise caused to me.  :D :D :D

Serves you right for not trusting the good old Flukies.  ;)
 

Offline Kiriakos-GR

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Re: EEVblog #178 - Agilent's U1272A response
« Reply #39 on: June 17, 2011, 09:34:55 pm »
Your guess is wrong, I just shoot my foot by mistake from the excitement, that this surprise caused to me.  :D :D :D

Serves you right for not trusting the good old Flukies.  ;)

Basically I am the most neutral observer in the pack,
and I am handling the situation with a large portion of humor.  ;)  

I entered in the Guinness book today, I am the first person in all the planet,
who got an U1272A with firmware 2.0, that it was preloaded from the factory !!  ;D

Long live the EEV  ;)


Edit: I forgot to add the link !!   :P 
https://www.eevblog.com/forum/index.php?topic=3232.msg50534#msg50534
« Last Edit: June 17, 2011, 09:38:00 pm by Kiriakos-GR »
 

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Re: EEVblog #178 - Agilent's U1272A response
« Reply #40 on: June 17, 2011, 11:34:58 pm »
I entered in the Guinness book today, I am the first person in all the planet,
who got an U1272A with firmware 2.0, that it was preloaded from the factory !!  ;D

I don't have 2.0 yet! (no USB cable yet)

Dave.
 

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Re: EEVblog #178 - Agilent's U1272A response
« Reply #41 on: June 18, 2011, 01:41:58 am »
Do nor worry Dave you will get it soon ..
Your contact has almost the same timezone with you.  :) 

One last picture before I remove all those tags like  ( demo unit - not for resale and such )
In Greece we never sale the gifts.  ;)

 
 

Offline kaptain_zero

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Re: EEVblog #178 - Agilent's U1272A response
« Reply #42 on: June 18, 2011, 03:34:48 am »
Well, no surprise really, Fluke have responded.
I just got a call from them and they have not only fixed the GSM problem (official explanation, they found a few RF sensitive components), but a new revision board is being tested as we speak.
I'll hope to have a lot more on this a later date...

So although they didn't get back to us on the progress, they have been head down bum up fixing it. Good to see!

Dave.

Good news indeed.....  Looking forward to the final resolution.


Kaptain "Perhaps I'd better bake up a humble pie.... just in case" Zero
 

Offline ToddFun

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Re: EEVblog #178 - Agilent's U1272A response
« Reply #43 on: July 30, 2011, 10:44:39 am »
 >:( Dave, when do we get the product review for the 1272A?  >:(
 

Offline smile

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Re: EEVblog #178 - Agilent's U1272A response
« Reply #44 on: August 15, 2011, 01:55:17 am »
I have to say some companies stand behind their products :) It's good that I got Agilent DMM too.

And I must say that one company that does not care is EPSON
Yep "another BIG company that just sweeps problems under the carpet" You see I've been trying to buy this nice best their got A4 Scanner EPSON V750 Pro, its top of the line product quite expensive too

This scanner price is:

781.974 EUR
1,136.58 USD
704.615 GBP

The problem is I've bought 7 total scanners from EPSON and they all have manufacturing defect. Dust particles even 3mm in size in side the scanner on the glass and lurking inside the case, and the scanner glass is dirty/foggy.

You can see what I mean by looking at my tread here http://www.photo-i.co.uk/BB/viewtopic.php?f=34&t=7050&st=0&sk=t&sd=a

Now 7 out of 7 that 100% failure rate, and since the scanner is manufactured since 2006 either they made very large batch of bad scanners and want to "sweep it under the carpet"  or  EPSON doesn't even care they make shit product nowdays.
 

Offline Kiriakos-GR

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Re: EEVblog #178 - Agilent's U1272A response
« Reply #45 on: August 15, 2011, 02:23:25 am »
Call me lucky, I own one Epson Perfection 610, about 200EUR, still lives and I do the cleaning every 2-3 years.
Has a nice label at the back  ( parts made in Japan) .
 

Offline smile

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Re: EEVblog #178 - Agilent's U1272A response
« Reply #46 on: August 15, 2011, 12:54:19 pm »
Call me lucky, I own one Epson Perfection 610, about 200EUR, still lives and I do the cleaning every 2-3 years.
Has a nice label at the back  ( parts made in Japan) .

Well the problems seems related to EPSON V750 Pro the model with optical coating on everything, so I can't call you lucky.
But if my local official distributor for EPSON V750 Pro refuses to sell you another sample then go figure...
 

Offline PetrosA

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Re: EEVblog #178 - Agilent's U1272A response
« Reply #47 on: August 15, 2011, 01:46:36 pm »
Every scanner I've owned or used (3 Agfas, 2 Linotypes and some "big boy" DTP flatbeds) have all needed to be cleaned from time to time. The top comes off and the glass and lenses get cleaned. There isn't a scanner made that doesn't suffer from dust and, in fact, that's why drum scanners use oil - to hide dust and air bubbles.
I miss my home I miss my porch, porch
 

Offline Kiriakos-GR

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Re: EEVblog #178 - Agilent's U1272A response
« Reply #48 on: August 15, 2011, 04:02:47 pm »
One last message about the flatbed scanners,
I got my scanner back to 2000, and I call my self lucky due the fact that it is build with Japanese parts,
even if it was assembled out of Japan.

They had the honesty to print such a detail, even at label of it, at the back.
At the same time ( back them ), the HP ones was assembled in China, with lost of dust particles  and dirty glass.

The specific Epson  flatbed scanner, comes with metallic base, and metallic moving parts,
and so it survived until today, and looks immortal.
I did payed the price premium back then, I was able to get two plastic ones, instead of the Epson.
But I love quality.
I was trusting HP about printers back to 2001, the 970CXi ( 382 EUR) it is an amazing tool, like the specific Epson scanner,
but this days everything that they make looks to have a very short life, something that I do hate.     



 
 

Uncle Vernon

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Re: EEVblog #178 - Agilent's U1272A response
« Reply #49 on: August 16, 2011, 02:43:51 am »
That serial number looks to have been tampered with, we'll have to hope it's the legitimate item.  :P
 


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