Author Topic: EEVblog #598 - Sony DME7000 Video Multi Effects Processor  (Read 16466 times)

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Offline Stonent

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EEVblog #598 - Sony DME7000 Video Multi Effects Processor
« on: April 03, 2014, 04:53:58 am »


The 15 pin D-Sub port on the back is an AUI Ethernet port.  ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Attachment_Unit_Interface )
You need to plug a MAU into it to set your media type, be it twisted pair, coax or Fiber.

At the time when there were several media standards for Ethernet, the AUI port was more common.  The transceiver hardware was inside the MAU and not on the board.





And H and V are Horizontal and Vertical.
« Last Edit: April 03, 2014, 05:19:05 am by Stonent »
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Offline station240

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Re: EEVblog #598 - Sony DME7000 Video Multi Effects Processor
« Reply #1 on: April 03, 2014, 05:41:55 am »
I'm sure one of the (few) community TV stations in Australia would love this unit, if only it had the console unit.
Looks like Dave was being careful with it so it can find a new home with someone.
A quick search online shows it to be any PAL signal not just the Australian version.

The block diagrams for the custom chips are interesting, a lot of mathematical operations done in much the same way as Photoshop matrix stuff, eg OR, AND, XOR.
Just because it's video doesn't change how it works, does mean a lot of CPUs to serial control the chips to do fancy effects like wipes.
No wonder it has 40 MIPS of main CPU per card.

It's curious the DIP chips are only soldered on the underside.
 

Offline Bored@Work

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Re: EEVblog #598 - Sony DME7000 Video Multi Effects Processor
« Reply #2 on: April 03, 2014, 07:16:34 am »
The CXD8060Q was rather obvious, wasn't it? Called Polar Coordinate and then processing two input signals, squaring them, adding them, and calculating the square root of the sum (all in the block diagram). Now, what would the result of these operations be :)
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Offline positivenucleus

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Re: EEVblog #598 - Sony DME7000 Video Multi Effects Processor
« Reply #3 on: April 03, 2014, 07:26:44 am »
Nice box you scored there!  This is really pretty good gear.

Is this device PAL or NTSC labeled somewhere?

I spent a part of my life in broadcast TV env, so regarding some terms:
* I think the D1/D2 stand for digital video stream, in D1 or D2 type, which basically is composite or component, I do not remember the exact numbers for the D's.
* A "key" video is a video you use to cut, think of it as a transparency mask, which can use only Y, or the chroma part (called chroma key then)

Sony in those days manufactured (maybe still today) a lot of video/audio handling chips, from ADC/DAC, conversion, mixing, etc.  Other manufacturers used them.  I have seen Sony ADC/DAC and composite/component conversion chips in Panasonic DVCPro devices.

Pretty interesting you found datasheets for the mixing elements like the the "component to composite digital converter" (CXD8063), "to channel video mixer" (8062), "polar coordinate" (8060).   

One interesting block I saw was the float integer one.
 

Offline SL4P

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Re: EEVblog #598 - Sony DME7000 Video Multi Effects Processor
« Reply #4 on: April 03, 2014, 09:24:32 am »
Dave -

I love your video blog segments - and learn quite a bit about gear I'm unlikely to stumble across in daily life.
I'd like to offer an idea for you to consider in future videos.

In pure electronics - 'scopes, PSUs, T&M etc, or retail electronics - your teardowns are extremely entertaining and informative. In professional gear especially - there may be an opportunity to co-host with an industry specific technologist that can round-out the edges of your electronics experience with contextual knowledge of the DUT (Device Under Teardown!)

Sometimes it may be just simple terminology, and others I've seen have assumptions that are just wrong or incomplete.

With that second dimension of conversational input to the blog - no-one wants to be a know-it-all, it may help communicate some of the finer details of why & how a specific design or strategy was chosen and operates.

Cheers & thanks for the great series. (ex broadcast, engineering & operations)
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Offline SL4P

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Re: EEVblog #598 - Sony DME7000 Video Multi Effects Processor
« Reply #5 on: April 03, 2014, 09:30:19 am »
P.S1> on the control surface the trackball was a nice piece pf work, with the 2D manipulation on the actual ball, while the surrounding 'ring' could also be used to spin or manipulate the image in a third dimension.  Just 2c worth.

P.S2>  Oh and among other things - I was Tech Manager of Sony B&P (Broadcast & Professional) overseas for a while.
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Offline alimirjamali

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Re: EEVblog #598 - Sony DME7000 Video Multi Effects Processor
« Reply #6 on: April 03, 2014, 09:55:36 am »
Watched already till 20:00 of the teardown.

For those interested on Y, B-Y, R-Y (YUV) color space, see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/YPbPr. It was a trick to upgrade from Black and White to Color TV in the old days with backward compatibility. This allowed only two additional signals for color broadcast rather than 3 new signals (RGB). I wonder how much they saved by such stupid decision :rant:.

The Key-BNC inputs/outputs are for alpha channel (transparency) of the Video (Professional Chroma Key). This is the last 4 in 4:2:2:4 terminology. See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chroma_subsampling and http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alpha_compositing for more information. This was excellent for Computer Generated Videos (such as Subs, Animated Logos) to be overlaid on the main video.

Digital Input/Outputs are in SDI format. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Serial_digital_interface. These were replaced by HD-SDI in later versions. HDMI was considered low class consumer.
 

Offline EEVblog

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Re: EEVblog #598 - Sony DME7000 Video Multi Effects Processor
« Reply #7 on: April 03, 2014, 11:17:51 am »
In pure electronics - 'scopes, PSUs, T&M etc, or retail electronics - your teardowns are extremely entertaining and informative. In professional gear especially - there may be an opportunity to co-host with an industry specific technologist that can round-out the edges of your electronics experience with contextual knowledge of the DUT (Device Under Teardown!)

I've done that before.
The problem is finding such people and then handling the logistics of getting them to contribute to the video (how do you do that unless they are onsite?). The amount of effort required for that will often outweigh the benefit of getting a bit more accuracy at the top level in this case. And unless they are the designer, they wouldn't have a clue about the internals, so they likely can't help there.

 

Offline VK3DRB

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Re: EEVblog #598 - Sony DME7000 Video Multi Effects Processor
« Reply #8 on: April 03, 2014, 11:22:46 am »
Thanks for the excellent quality video, Dave. I felt like I was there.

Agreed, there is beauty is high quality professional gear you don't get with consumer crap. But it is disappointing if full circuit diagrams are not available, and the device has been designed for swap-out, rather than fixing. I hate that!

It reminded me of Japanese New Long paste screener for mass PCB assembly. This machine cost $800,000 to buy. It has about 12 large PCBs with a backplane, similar in size to the Sony boards. One day it developed a fault where the machine failed with an error. A mate and myself got the job of debugging it but there were no circuit diagrams available or rack mount extender cards for servicing. The only solution was to manually debug it with a CRO, by soldering on extension wires, powering it up and checking signals. After many hours of debugging whilst everyone else was at the IBM Christmas party, we found the fault  - a shorted collector to emitter in a small signal transistor. We replaced it with a shonky DS148 from home (Tricky Dicky's relabelled BC148) and voila! it worked a treat. The plant manager did not even grab us a beer for a job well done, let alone think to thank us. Even so, we got a lot of satisfaction fixing that problem and that was more than ample reward.

These days, you can forget about getting a schematic diagram with anything much. Companies are too bloody inept to consider those who are skilled enough to debug hardware. Even Tandy gave a schematic diagram with their $10 transistor radios years ago. THERE WAS A TIME WHEN EVERY TV SET HAD A DECENT CIRCUIT DIAGRAM IN THE BACK, SHOWING THE EXPECTED WAVEFORMS.
« Last Edit: April 03, 2014, 11:25:14 am by VK3DRB »
 

Offline Skimask

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Re: EEVblog #598 - Sony DME7000 Video Multi Effects Processor
« Reply #9 on: April 03, 2014, 01:35:07 pm »
What's the layer count on those boards?
I didn't take it apart.
I turned it on.

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Offline danijel

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Re: EEVblog #598 - Sony DME7000 Video Multi Effects Processor
« Reply #10 on: April 03, 2014, 02:03:28 pm »
The CXD8060Q was rather obvious, wasn't it? Called Polar Coordinate and then processing two input signals, squaring them, adding them, and calculating the square root of the sum (all in the block diagram). Now, what would the result of these operations be :)

The top part is obviously used to calculate the magnitude and bottom is for the phase. I'm guessing the ROM is simply a lookup table for the ctg function. But what is the ROT use for? Also, what do you think this would be used in? Would it be used for some Fourier calculations or is there some other, strictly video related use?
 

Offline bitwelder

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Re: EEVblog #598 - Sony DME7000 Video Multi Effects Processor
« Reply #11 on: April 03, 2014, 06:21:36 pm »
If each slot in the chassis is dedicated for a specific board, shouldn't be some keying present to avoid human error while inserting the boards?
 

Offline yvesdm3000

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Re: EEVblog #598 - Sony DME7000 Video Multi Effects Processor
« Reply #12 on: April 03, 2014, 07:20:11 pm »
The component part of this unit is mostly for backwards compatibility. Nowadays we use almost all digital... The digital signals are actually called "SDI" and some info is here:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Serial_digital_interface

-Yves
 

Offline simontheu

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Re: EEVblog #598 - Sony DME7000 Video Multi Effects Processor
« Reply #13 on: April 03, 2014, 07:54:54 pm »
Absolutely brilliant as always. I work in OB vans and have access to the latest version of this device. Aswell as that, I have the maintenance manual, and with it block diagrams! What do you want to see?

Keep up the good work!
 

Offline SNGLinks

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Re: EEVblog #598 - Sony DME7000 Video Multi Effects Processor
« Reply #14 on: April 03, 2014, 10:53:59 pm »
Perhaps the white splodges on some boards were property markers using 'DNA' style tagging?
 

Offline Slothie

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Re: EEVblog #598 - Sony DME7000 Video Multi Effects Processor
« Reply #15 on: April 04, 2014, 12:18:06 am »
The AUI nework interface was common in the late 80s/early 90s when thickwire ethernet was around because the MAU (Media Attachment Unit) had to be physically bolted onto the ethernet cable (a 12mm dia coax if I remember) and it pierced the cable to connect to the central conductor. There where some electronics in the MAU that converted the signals to two differential signals, and the AUI cable carried those signals and power for the MAU.

The interface was logically very similar to twisted pair, although twisted pair doesn't have dedicated power wires and the signal levels may be different. Logically speaking a twisted pair hub is like a group of MAU's attached to an virtual ethernet cable inside the hub.
 

Offline calexanian

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Re: EEVblog #598 - Sony DME7000 Video Multi Effects Processor
« Reply #16 on: April 04, 2014, 02:13:41 am »
Wonder how much that thing cost when it was new, and how much it was when they discontinued it.
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Offline Smokey

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Re: EEVblog #598 - Sony DME7000 Video Multi Effects Processor
« Reply #17 on: April 04, 2014, 04:06:44 am »
OK.. I'll be the first one to check...

One DME7000 on ebay.  With the console thing...

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Sony-DME-7000-BKDM-3010-/251489277269?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item3a8dedd555

only $4999 USD :)
 

Offline hikariuk

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Re: EEVblog #598 - Sony DME7000 Video Multi Effects Processor
« Reply #18 on: April 04, 2014, 06:04:42 am »
The AUI nework interface was common in the late 80s/early 90s when thickwire ethernet was around because the MAU (Media Attachment Unit) had to be physically bolted onto the ethernet cable (a 12mm dia coax if I remember) and it pierced the cable to connect to the central conductor. There where some electronics in the MAU that converted the signals to two differential signals, and the AUI cable carried those signals and power for the MAU.

The interface was logically very similar to twisted pair, although twisted pair doesn't have dedicated power wires and the signal levels may be different. Logically speaking a twisted pair hub is like a group of MAU's attached to an virtual ethernet cable inside the hub.

I worked on a new build factory in the mid-90s, working on the SCADA, HMI, and PLC side of things.  The PLCs and SCADA stations were all connected to the network using 10Base2.  I still have a stash of AUI-to-BNC/Cat5 adapter dongles as a result.  And some old Cat5 hubs (yes, not switches) which had AUI connectors on so you could use them when a group of you were working together.  All the SCADA stations were running Windows 3.1 and Wonderware Intouch back then, I think using the Chameleon WinSock TCP/IP stack.

Last time I went back in the mid 2000s they'd switched to 100BASE-FX (at least for the SCADA stations; PLCs probably got done as well, but I honestly can't remember - they would have needed adapters because the ethernet units in them didn't do FX).  Might well have switched to 1000BASE-?X by now.
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Offline NiHaoMike

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Re: EEVblog #598 - Sony DME7000 Video Multi Effects Processor
« Reply #19 on: April 04, 2014, 01:33:23 pm »
I'm sure one of the (few) community TV stations in Australia would love this unit, if only it had the console unit.
Looks like Dave was being careful with it so it can find a new home with someone.
A quick search online shows it to be any PAL signal not just the Australian version.

The block diagrams for the custom chips are interesting, a lot of mathematical operations done in much the same way as Photoshop matrix stuff, eg OR, AND, XOR.
Just because it's video doesn't change how it works, does mean a lot of CPUs to serial control the chips to do fancy effects like wipes.
No wonder it has 40 MIPS of main CPU per card.
Nowadays, it can all be done with a GPU. I wonder what's the oldest GPU with comparable performance to that rackmount unit...
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Offline SubSonic

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Re: EEVblog #598 - Sony DME7000 Video Multi Effects Processor
« Reply #20 on: April 04, 2014, 07:24:15 pm »
Are TV stations still use such equipment or do they use ordinary off-the-shelf computer hardware to do this all in software nowadays (especially with everything beeing digital)?
 

Offline Mike Warren

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Re: EEVblog #598 - Sony DME7000 Video Multi Effects Processor
« Reply #21 on: April 04, 2014, 08:59:05 pm »
Are TV stations still use such equipment or do they use ordinary off-the-shelf computer hardware to do this all in software nowadays (especially with everything beeing digital)?

The hardware is easier to use, more reliable and needs less maintenance than a computer based system, so most large TV stations still use this sort of thing (especially if they already have it), but computers are becoming more common. Smaller TV stations and production houses use computers.
« Last Edit: April 04, 2014, 10:43:23 pm by Mike Warren »
 

Offline cloudscapes

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Re: EEVblog #598 - Sony DME7000 Video Multi Effects Processor
« Reply #22 on: April 05, 2014, 12:22:49 am »
Great teardown!

The "key" references probably have to do with chroma key channels/masks which have to do with compositing. You'd run news anchors filmed against greenscreens through that and swap it out with a weather or sports background. Among other things.

....rather than keyframes as Dave suggested.
 

Offline zimzom

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Re: EEVblog #598 - Sony DME7000 Video Multi Effects Processor
« Reply #23 on: April 05, 2014, 02:33:59 am »
Ah if only you could see the software, I bet a lot of the algorithms got reimplemented in software for there later PC stuff. Can't imagine they would have just left all that know how and experience just rot away somewhere.

I like the high end tear downs, its great to see the differences in build quality, shielding, design.
 

Offline jeremybarker

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Re: EEVblog #598 - Sony DME7000 Video Multi Effects Processor
« Reply #24 on: April 05, 2014, 09:39:43 pm »
According to BroadcastStore.com the original list price was $24,500! They are offering used units at $18,078.30 or $579.95/mo on a 3-year lease deal.
 

Offline simontheu

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Re: EEVblog #598 - Sony DME7000 Video Multi Effects Processor
« Reply #25 on: April 06, 2014, 06:31:36 pm »
Are TV stations still use such equipment or do they use ordinary off-the-shelf computer hardware to do this all in software nowadays (especially with everything beeing digital)?

Still done in hardware now for HD/SD realtime live applications, software is not time deterministic enough. The hardware always takes a frame to process (40ms for 1080i50), and the hardware's user interface is tightly coupled with the vision mixer hardware.

However our company used to use the exact same model DVE7000 for video editing where the timeline was played out and recorded back in with effects on (Lightworks - could play and record simultaneously). Now however its all done with After Effects and Fusion, plus basic timeline effects (Grass Valley Edius).
 

Offline havard

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Re: EEVblog #598 - Sony DME7000 Video Multi Effects Processor
« Reply #26 on: April 06, 2014, 06:59:54 pm »
To me, the most interesting part is that Sony PCBs look like Sony PCBs, regardless of whether they are for some high-end gear or a mass-produced low tier item.
 

Offline funkyworm

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Re: EEVblog #598 - Sony DME7000 Video Multi Effects Processor
« Reply #27 on: April 07, 2014, 03:01:34 pm »
What a great video; I used to install & service these (and the smaller DME3000) in the nineties/early-noughties. Here are a few notes;

  • Serial number - Sony pro video gear has the first two digits as a year marker - 50xxx would be from 1995. To see 50760 (or whatever Dave showed) surprised me - generally most TV DVEs (digital video effects) sold in the low hundreds.
  • Depending on options and year these were between £50,000 and £100,000 which was very standard for this kind of machine.
  • The Sony DMEs were an awful lot more reliable than the equivalents from Ampex (the ADO range), and Abekas (the A50-series) all of which were very common in TV Studios, edit suites and Outside Broadcast trucks.
  • Since the mid-90s post production has been done on workstations which can handle digital video effects either as an internal PCI-e card or (more common now) via the GPU. In Studios where real-time, synchronous performance is needed dedicated hardware is still used for handling video.

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Offline Kibi

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Re: EEVblog #598 - Sony DME7000 Video Multi Effects Processor
« Reply #28 on: April 07, 2014, 06:54:22 pm »
Marvellous teardown that was.
I found two DME7000's today. If I can find the rest of the bits that go with them I'll see if I can fire one of them up for a laugh.
 

Offline OzOnE

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Re: EEVblog #598 - Sony DME7000 Video Multi Effects Processor
« Reply #29 on: April 11, 2014, 07:41:16 pm »
I agree with Kibi - fantastic teardown vid, Dave.

@Kibi - would you be interested in selling one of the DME7000 units at all?
Just wondering roughly how much they would be worth nowadays?

I bought a Quantel Harriet about 18 months ago, but there are a few people I know who might want to buy a DME7000 system.


@funkworm - I hadn't seen your YT channel before - subbed!
btw, have you worked with any Quantel Paintbox / V-Series boxes in the past?

Your name sounds familiar? Have we spoken about the Paintbox before?

EDIT: Ohhh - Big Brother! That makes sense...
http://philtechnicalblog.blogspot.co.uk/2007/01/celebrity-big-brother.html


Would anyone be interested in the service manual for the DME7000?

If people fancy a look, I don't mind paying for it...

http://www.sony.owner-manuals.com/DME7000-service-manual-SONY.html

http://www.manuals-in-pdf.com/download-DME7000-SONY-p-1420398.html


I've been helping to restore an original Quantel DPB 7001 Paintbox for Steve (RetroGamerVX on YouTube), so I found the Sony teardown fascinating...



That particular Paintbox was used by the BBC for the effects on things like Doctor Who and Tripods.
We're not 100% sure about exactly which programs it was used for, but definitely for a lot of the BBC News stuff / logos / credits etc.

I spent about 5 months reverse-engineering it's 68000 based CPU1 board from two rather grainy photos of the PCB (Steve is quite a few miles away from me in the north of the UK, I'm down in Devon / Mordor).

After I did that bit of RE on the CPU1 board, they guy who donated the PB said he'd found the full service manuals for the damned thing in his loft! lol

It looks like the Sony works in a similar way to the PB, although obviously far more advanced.

The PB uses almost all '74 series logic chips on most of the boards, and some oldskool ADC / DAC / Digital Multiplier chips for the image processing.

It has two main framestores, which consist of 640KB of DRAM each (IIRC).

It then has a separate smaller "Brush" store, which gets loaded with the specific pattern for the currently chosen brush.
During the drawing process, the brush pattern gets multiplied by the image data from one or both framestores, or from a solid colour.

The multiplier for the brush process is taken from the pressure data from the tablet stylus itself. 8)

As you can see in the vid above, it came with a gigantic 335MB Fujitsu SMD hard drive with 14" platters.
We don't yet know what data is on the drive, but we've been told that the whole lot was decommissioned apparently with the data intact.

Unfortunately, we haven't been able to get it to fully boot 'cos it's stuck waiting for the hard drive.
The status lights on the hard drive suggest that it's working fine, so it must either be a cable or interface board issue?

The same goes for the 8" floppy disks - some of the disk covers have actually been signed by the BBC gfx dept.
We've tried to recover the data on them using a PC and adapter cable, but haven't had much luck yet.

A large number of the Tantalum bead caps inside the Paintbox chassis exploded after a few hours of being switched on, so most of those had to be replaced.

And then both the big 1000 Watt original Gould HiFlex power supplies exploded. :-[
So, I had to rig up a "new" PSU based on a big Cisco server PSU.

Most of it runs off +5V of course, but it also needed +/- 12V for the opamps / ADCs / DACs etc., and a -5V supply at quite a few amps.


Anywho - would anyone like to see if the full schematics are in that Sony DME-7000 service manual?

OzOnE.
« Last Edit: April 11, 2014, 08:19:42 pm by OzOnE »
 

Offline Richard Crowley

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Re: EEVblog #598 - Sony DME7000 Video Multi Effects Processor
« Reply #30 on: April 13, 2014, 06:10:30 pm »

Great teardown!

The "key" references probably have to do with chroma key channels/masks which have to do with compositing. You'd run news anchors filmed against greenscreens through that and swap it out with a weather or sports background. Among other things.

....rather than keyframes as Dave suggested.


Yes, the "key" signal is used to "switch" between the background video and the "overlay" (typically text, etc.)  Or, in the case of "chroma key" (where the weather reporter stands before a green-painted wall) the "key" signal is used to switch between the foreground (reporter) and the background (plain green wall which is replaced with weather graphics from a computer).

To the graphics people, the "key" is refered to as the "alpha channel" or "transparency key".  In the UK, chroma-key is called "CSO" (Color Separation Overlay)

The key signal can be binary (which would create a "hard-switch" between the video signals such as a reporter against a green-screen).
Or it can be linear/analog, where you see semi-transparent backgrounds behind fancy "lower-1/3rd" titles.

Just returned last week from the NAB convention in Las Vegas. The largest collection of TV/cine production gear on the planet.
Many vendors were demonstrating 2nd and 3rd generation green-screen "chroma-key" systems where multiple sensors in the lighting grid tracked the exact location and orientation of the cameras, and various prop proxy gadgets to allow downstream computers to "key in" all kinds of synthetically-generated backgrounds, etc.  Even to the point of stopping a football(soccer) game in mid-play and the commentator moving between the players to describe key plays.

And American football viewers are used to seeing all sorts of graphics "projected" (keyed) onto the green sod of the playing field.  How convenient that grass turned out to be "chroma-key green"!   ;D
« Last Edit: April 13, 2014, 07:33:11 pm by Richard Crowley »
 

Offline Richard Crowley

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Re: EEVblog #598 - Sony DME7000 Video Multi Effects Processor
« Reply #31 on: April 13, 2014, 07:32:25 pm »

I'm sure one of the (few) community TV stations in Australia would love this unit, if only it had the console unit.
Haven't all TV production switched over to HD digital (16x9) by now in Australia?
That is why that (presumably perfecly good and functional) unit is just dead-weight at this point. It is analog, standard-definition.
There is a glut of perfectly good analog, standard-definition video equipment all over the place because the world has moved on.

And all the gear manufacturers at NAB last week tried their best to convince us that even HD is antiquated.
Everything is 4K now!
 

Offline hikariuk

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Re: EEVblog #598 - Sony DME7000 Video Multi Effects Processor
« Reply #32 on: April 14, 2014, 04:19:22 am »

I'm sure one of the (few) community TV stations in Australia would love this unit, if only it had the console unit.
Haven't all TV production switched over to HD digital (16x9) by now in Australia?
That is why that (presumably perfecly good and functional) unit is just dead-weight at this point. It is analog, standard-definition.
There is a glut of perfectly good analog, standard-definition video equipment all over the place because the world has moved on.

And all the gear manufacturers at NAB last week tried their best to convince us that even HD is antiquated.
Everything is 4K now!

Sony are pushing 8K for the production side of life, iirc.
I write software.  I'd far rather be doing something else.
 

Offline Richard Crowley

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Re: EEVblog #598 - Sony DME7000 Video Multi Effects Processor
« Reply #33 on: April 14, 2014, 03:33:01 pm »
Sony are pushing 8K for the production side of life, iirc.
Yeah, and 6K was seen in some places, as well.  But when I go to my local cinema, they are projecting 2K!
 

Offline andersm

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Re: EEVblog #598 - Sony DME7000 Video Multi Effects Processor
« Reply #34 on: April 14, 2014, 08:12:20 pm »
The chipset for the original Playstation is supposed to have its roots in Sony's DME-9000 effects processor. Was that an earlier or later model? Early revisions of the PS1 also used an IDT-manufactured MIPS CPU (a 33MHz 3051).

Offline tekvax

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Re: EEVblog #598 - Sony DME7000 Video Multi Effects Processor
« Reply #35 on: April 18, 2014, 02:55:22 am »
Dave,

we tossed a bunch of these out at work! sad sad day! no more linear editing systems! everyone WANTS avid non-linear editing these days!

i think i may still have the service manual around somewhere!

The Key i/p is a keyhole matte signal for cutting a hole in the picture for graphics and wipes... think alpha channel...?
 
They were a PIG to align the boards!! tons of op-amps and voltage dividers! and the tiny caps were really tough to replace!?

those sbx1602's were MADE of pure expensive!! They are serial digital CCIR601 to parallel digital conversion chips!! I had a buy a couple and replace the i/p's and o/p's on a switcher once!!! $400 or $500 buck US a piece!!?
Reply

matrix encoder chips... likely for the video switcher crosspoint routing of the video signals to and from the various other modules... *(he says without checking the manual!)?
Reply
 
2 dash 3 may be 3 - 2 pull down correction...?
 
the relays are likely for GPIO contact closures...?

Cheers.
Dan

 

Offline dexters_lab

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Re: EEVblog #598 - Sony DME7000 Video Multi Effects Processor
« Reply #36 on: February 15, 2017, 05:48:46 pm »
i'm cringing at the massive thread bump here, sorry  :-[

...but i seem to have a mixer/effects panel that worked as a system with the DME-7000

if there is enough interest i could do a teardown on my channel
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Offline Richard Crowley

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Re: EEVblog #598 - Sony DME7000 Video Multi Effects Processor
« Reply #37 on: February 16, 2017, 12:20:57 am »
That is the "front end", the User Interface, while the box that Dave tore-down was the "back-end" that did all the work.

Those things are big and impressive, but underneath they are a bit disappointing. They are just a big, glorified keyboard. with T-bar faders instead of mouse or touch-pad.  The unique parts are that display panel on top, and the tiny alphanumeric displays above the sections of buttons.

I really covet those switches, though. Those field-labeled, soft-action, lighted pushbutton switches are >$10 each.  I build video switcher panels (for Blackmagic Design ATEM switcher boxes) and those things are NOT CHEAP.  What are you going to do with them?

I tore down this thing last year and salvaged the switches, T-bars, etc.  It had an interesting little computer/controller inside with a 3.5 inch floppy disk drive just like the Sony panel you show.



 


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