Author Topic: EEVblog #697 - Mailbag  (Read 32416 times)

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Online EEVblog

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EEVblog #697 - Mailbag
« on: December 30, 2014, 05:03:31 am »
A bumper mailbag, the last one for 2014!

SPOILERS:

A car dashcam and custom automatic LCD video player from:
http://eve-radio.com/

Girl time!
And old GPS unit, and a PIN Calculator from Gemma & Liz a.k.a Annierak and Hoofbag
http://www.hoofbags.me.uk/
https://www.youtube.com/user/hoofbags
http://www.annierak.hoofbags.me.uk/

Blood Glucose meter

Crappy calculator with secret construction technique - cardboard!

High voltage Victor power supply modules

PicoPSU ATX Power Supply for embedded automotive computers:
http://www.mini-box.com/M3-ATX-DC-DC-ATX-Automotive-Computer-car-PC-Power-Supply?sc=8&category=981

Bubble memory from an old GRiD laptop computer.

I Dream Of Wires documentary DVD about the development of the electronic synthesiser.
http://www.idreamofwires.org/

The Human Comparator:
http://thehumancomparator.net/

http://www.spitzenpfeil.org

Precision electronics knives from:
http://ghlargh.com
https://www.youtube.com/user/Ghlargh

High altitude ballooning PCBs from Chris Stubbs:
http://chris-stubbs.co.uk/wp/
https://www.ukhas.net/

And an awesome drawing of Sagan from That Crazy Indian Bloke

 

Offline nitro2k01

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Re: EEVblog #697 - Mailbag
« Reply #1 on: December 30, 2014, 05:28:01 am »
Since you asked for comments on that...
How about you split the mailbag episodes into two videos, you could maybe call them A and B videos (#697A and #697B in this case.) In the A video, you open the mail, read the letter, and spend maybe maximum 3 minutes on each item. In the B video you explain what something is in more detail, test something quickly, or do a mini teardown. Of course, an item will only be in the B video if it's actually needed. Maybe that will make both camps happy. But maybe that gives you too much editing work?
« Last Edit: December 30, 2014, 05:35:46 am by nitro2k01 »
Whoa! How the hell did Dave know that Bob is my uncle? Amazing!
 

Offline Monkeh

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Re: EEVblog #697 - Mailbag
« Reply #2 on: December 30, 2014, 05:45:56 am »
The shutters on that socket are indeed activated by the earth pin. They're a one-piece plastic moulding in a runner, with a bevelled tip for the earth pin. They simply get pushed out of the way against a spring when you insert the plug.

By the way, you seem to have been attempting to check continuity between contacts and terminals with the switch off. Not only were you probing the line pin, but that is almost certainly a dual pole switch, so even with the shutters open, you'd get nowhere like that on either side. ;)

If you want to open it you'll have to drill out the rivets holding the earth bar on the back, the ones in the screw holes. Alternatively, just crack the whole plate off with a hammer or something.

E: Actually, that may be a socket which requires both live pins to open the shutter, not the earth. More prone to jamming.
« Last Edit: December 30, 2014, 04:25:30 pm by Monkeh »
 

Offline RobertoLG

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Re: EEVblog #697 - Mailbag
« Reply #3 on: December 30, 2014, 05:52:34 am »
Dave, please continue doing the teardowns when you open the mailbag stuff if possible, I  enjoy it, thanks
 

Offline robbak

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Re: EEVblog #697 - Mailbag
« Reply #4 on: December 30, 2014, 06:15:34 am »
Please continue doing mini teardowns and examinations. We learn a lot from them. Yes, you probably won't ever catch up, but I'd rather have some missed packages in order to have your interesting commentary!
 

Offline BobC

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Re: EEVblog #697 - Mailbag
« Reply #5 on: December 30, 2014, 06:23:09 am »
I like the idea of separate "A" and "B" videos, one for the mailbag bench and one for the teardown bench.  The goal being less editing for you (like the blabs), yet with all the yummy content your viewers desire!

Viewers could add the links between the video timelines, for those wanting to bounce between the two videos to get a more linear experience.  Something to try at least once, perhaps.

KUTGW,

-BobC
 

Offline jancumps

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Re: EEVblog #697 - Mailbag
« Reply #6 on: December 30, 2014, 08:45:17 am »
Seems the video is missing from the eevblog home page:

 

Offline LA7SJA

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Re: EEVblog #697 - Mailbag
« Reply #7 on: December 30, 2014, 09:27:58 am »
Yes! It seems to be missing, but you can try this.



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Offline jancumps

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Re: EEVblog #697 - Mailbag
« Reply #8 on: December 30, 2014, 09:32:45 am »
Yes! It seems to be missing, but you can try this.



JFG

Yes, I was just flagging that it's missing. Should have made that clearer.
 

Offline woox2k

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Re: EEVblog #697 - Mailbag
« Reply #9 on: December 30, 2014, 10:09:03 am »
You could just leave out 2 minute teardowns from Mailbag but make teardown tuesday videos include those missed "2min teardowns" as well that would never get their own teardown video. (They are still interesting) This suggestion is only for a case where you have too many packages to open and cannot keep up with the inflow. If you don't have many packages to open then just keep doing what you do.

Or you could just start making "Weird Wednesday" videos where you slap together all sorts of stuff that does not fit into other videos. 2min teardowns, 2min reviews to stuff from mailbag and so on.
 

Offline hikariuk

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Re: EEVblog #697 - Mailbag
« Reply #10 on: December 30, 2014, 10:46:25 am »
*waves at Chris Stubbs from Maldon*
I write software.  I'd far rather be doing something else.
 

Offline ornea

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Re: EEVblog #697 - Mailbag
« Reply #11 on: December 30, 2014, 10:48:32 am »
My two cents ... I like the mini tear downs.  I learn so much.
 

Offline ornea

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Re: EEVblog #697 - Mailbag
« Reply #12 on: December 30, 2014, 10:56:19 am »
I would happily pay an annual fee for the ABC to keep it quality and impartial.
 

Offline nathanpc

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Re: EEVblog #697 - Mailbag
« Reply #13 on: December 30, 2014, 11:47:57 am »
I really love the mini teardowns, please keep doing them. :)
 

Offline Kean

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Re: EEVblog #697 - Mailbag
« Reply #14 on: December 30, 2014, 12:29:05 pm »
Due to rules in Australia on sales of knives to minors, importation of knives and daggers is restricted, and customs could have confiscated those scalpels.
Same for laser pointers!  They're trying to take away all our fun things one by one...  |O
http://www.customs.gov.au/site/page4369.asp
 

Offline ondreji

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Re: EEVblog #697 - Mailbag
« Reply #15 on: December 30, 2014, 12:56:50 pm »
Chip & pin is a good thing (google for EMV). Painful to use but safer that SMS one time password. The point is that your online transfer is signed by your card: you need to enter destination account and amount and you get unique signature which can be checked by the bank. (some malware is able to change destination account / amount when you hit submit but in this case signature will be different)

But Australian banking so behind that they might skip this technology at all :). Finally, last year, the banks agreed on real-time payments which are common in many EU countries since early 2000.
 

Offline Mark Hennessy

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Re: EEVblog #697 - Mailbag
« Reply #16 on: December 30, 2014, 01:14:15 pm »
"150VDC nominal" sounds a lot like 115VAC after rectification and smoothing.

I've seen lots of those modules in broadcast kit here. Usually in 3U Eurocard format, with mains input stuff mounted on the PCB ahead of 2 or 3 of the modules. They haven't been the most reliable things we've known.
 

Offline firewalker

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Re: EEVblog #697 - Mailbag
« Reply #17 on: December 30, 2014, 01:18:48 pm »
Is this compression for 720p ok? I think it used to be quite sharp. Is it a youtube issue?




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Become a realist, stay a dreamer.

 

Offline GreyWoolfe

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Re: EEVblog #697 - Mailbag
« Reply #18 on: December 30, 2014, 03:10:10 pm »
We have safety outlets that are similar here in the US.  They look just like the regular outlets that mount in the wall boxes.  I have installed them in the Granddaughter's bedroom so she can't stick anything in them.  They work very well.  In fact, it takes a bit of effort to insert a plug into them, I was not able to put anything else into them.  I probably could have with some excessive force but the granddaughter can't.  That made her momma and SWMBO very happy.
"Heaven has been described as the place that once you get there all the dogs you ever loved run up to greet you."
 

Offline ShawnD

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Re: EEVblog #697 - Mailbag
« Reply #19 on: December 30, 2014, 03:16:43 pm »
We have safety outlets that are similar here in the US.

Those require something to be inserted in both the live and neutral sockets at the same time to open (http://www.nfpa.org/safety-information/for-consumers/causes/electrical/tamper-resistant-electrical-receptacles is the first link I found).  It looks like they are becoming required by code.

I guess the UK requires 3 prong plugs even when grounding is not needed since they use the earth pin to open the shutter.
 

Offline SNGLinks

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Re: EEVblog #697 - Mailbag
« Reply #20 on: December 30, 2014, 04:07:23 pm »
The shutters on that socket are indeed activated by the earth pin. They're a one-piece plastic moulding in a runner, with a bevelled tip for the earth pin. They simply get pushed out of the way against a spring when you insert the plug.

By the way, you seem to have been attempting to check continuity between contacts and terminals with the switch off. Not only were you probing the line pin, but that is almost certainly a dual pole switch, so even with the shutters open, you'd get nowhere like that on either side. ;)

If you want to open it you'll have to drill out the rivets holding the earth bar on the back, the ones in the screw holes. Alternatively, just crack the whole plate off with a hammer or something.

It was being held upside down :) or are plugs and sockets upside down in the southern hemisphere?
 

Offline Monkeh

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Re: EEVblog #697 - Mailbag
« Reply #21 on: December 30, 2014, 04:08:58 pm »
The shutters on that socket are indeed activated by the earth pin. They're a one-piece plastic moulding in a runner, with a bevelled tip for the earth pin. They simply get pushed out of the way against a spring when you insert the plug.

By the way, you seem to have been attempting to check continuity between contacts and terminals with the switch off. Not only were you probing the line pin, but that is almost certainly a dual pole switch, so even with the shutters open, you'd get nowhere like that on either side. ;)

If you want to open it you'll have to drill out the rivets holding the earth bar on the back, the ones in the screw holes. Alternatively, just crack the whole plate off with a hammer or something.

It was being held upside down :) or are plugs and sockets upside down in the southern hemisphere?

Even the people are upside down, down under!
 

Offline Tek_TDS220

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Re: EEVblog #697 - Mailbag
« Reply #22 on: December 30, 2014, 04:23:57 pm »
Regarding the mini-teardowns during the mail-bag, I think they are more efficient.  If you did them separately, you would need to re-introduce the device and the sender.  Either way, I will continue to watch.

Incidentally, I just bought an Agilent DSO-X 2000 scope based on one of your videos.  I never would have considered it otherwise. It is amazing.  I may have to change my username.
 

Offline lewis

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Re: EEVblog #697 - Mailbag
« Reply #23 on: December 30, 2014, 05:32:31 pm »
Incidentally, I just bought an Agilent DSO-X 2000 scope based on one of your videos.  I never would have considered it otherwise. It is amazing.  I may have to change my username.

I moved over to Agilent from Tek because of Dave, he's cost me a fortune. Never looked back!
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Offline classical

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Re: EEVblog #697 - Mailbag
« Reply #24 on: December 30, 2014, 06:59:02 pm »
Nowadays the German mains plug "Schuko" (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Schuko) also have the schutters over L and N. They are activated by pressing both L and N simultaneously. 
 

Offline SeanB

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Re: EEVblog #697 - Mailbag
« Reply #25 on: December 30, 2014, 06:59:24 pm »
SA/India use a shuttered socket as well. I have some 40 year old ones still in use, and they have a shutter mechanism.

The face recognition in cameras does not work in Africa, for some reason. I tested it out with a few of the demo cameras in a store one day, just looking at the customers.
 

Offline FrankBuss

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Re: EEVblog #697 - Mailbag
« Reply #26 on: December 30, 2014, 07:27:51 pm »
I like the longer-per-item mailbag more. Would like to see a 2 minute teardown of the multimeter, or powering up the tiny LED board to see it blinking.
So Long, and Thanks for All the Fish
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Offline simplifyiyuk

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Re: EEVblog #697 - Mailbag
« Reply #27 on: December 30, 2014, 10:13:23 pm »
those MK sockets are pretty cool. "bog standard" safety shutters are just pushed out the way with the earth pin.thats enough to meet the safety standard but MKs ive seen have either employed both L+N to engage shutter or all three as in this case probrably.

the earth probably unlocks the cams and the L+N going in at the same time swivels them out the way,

have a link https://www.mkelectric.com/en-my/Products/WD/white/logicplus/Pages/default.aspx

incidentally you can safely lick it and eat off it too...?
 

Offline nixfu

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Re: EEVblog #697 - Mailbag
« Reply #28 on: December 30, 2014, 10:18:03 pm »
I like the mini-teardowns frankly. 

The whole concept was totally correct originally.  Some things just require a quick teardown as part of the mailbag and are not worthy of a separate video.

However, there is also nothing wrong with speeding through some of the other stuff faster when you are backed up like you are now.
 

Offline old gregg

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Re: EEVblog #697 - Mailbag
« Reply #29 on: December 30, 2014, 10:56:07 pm »
I smiled when Dave opened the package with "dream of wires" DVD. I must watch that movie, looks very interesting !

Considering the mailbag format, I think it is fine. Do it as you want to do it Dave, that's what makes the thing fun and entertaining.
 

Offline dentaku

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Re: EEVblog #697 - Mailbag
« Reply #30 on: December 30, 2014, 11:26:58 pm »
I Dream Of Wires is a great documentary. I'm not sure about the theatrical release but the DVD version, about 2/3 into the video has bits about design and manufacturing stuff in North America which is still possible for modular synths because it's more of a niche/lower volume market and then there's a segment about the DIY stuff.

Jason Amm was also one of the creators of this film and he got to interview Vince Clarke of Depeche Mode, Yazoo, and currently Erasure at his amazing studio. Jason's music is also very good... bleepy synth stuff :)
It's also great the cEvin Key is in this because he's a legend of Canadian music.

By the way, Human Comparator is a kit seller but not your usual little LED binky stuff but full on giant synths with lots of light-up faders.
« Last Edit: December 30, 2014, 11:28:36 pm by dentaku »
 

Offline senso

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Re: EEVblog #697 - Mailbag
« Reply #31 on: December 30, 2014, 11:43:48 pm »
We have those shutter plugs in Portugal too, and its a pain in the ass to plug a regular schuko plug into a shutter plug(even with brand-name wall plugs), having round pins with a small diameter to push two shutters results in the need to apply a lot of force to plug the damn things, last summer I went replacing all the wall plugs in the house and before installing them I removed all the shutters, because we had already broken 2 plugs when trying to use them.
 

Offline Shredhead

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Re: EEVblog #697 - Mailbag
« Reply #32 on: December 31, 2014, 12:32:43 am »
Teardown porn is so way better than mailbag.  Mailbag is filler material compared to your content that teaches us stuff.

Please give that Sony camera to Sagan to add to the rest of his toys.  The quality of your videos has always stood out from the rest of the lot on the tube and it still does when you switch to your close up camera but that face camera is painfully unclear looking and the slow focus makes me want to punch something.

Just adding my two bits, don't take it the wrong way as I have much love for Dave and his family and will continue to view both EEVblog channels through the upcoming year!

 

Offline captainscarlet

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Re: EEVblog #697 - Mailbag
« Reply #33 on: December 31, 2014, 01:19:45 am »
Those chip and pin readers are still quite new. They act as a second verification when you want to transfer money to a new account online.

Basically you sign into your online banking, and when you enter the details of a new account you want to transfer money to, you get given four digits and prompted for a password. You get the password from inserting your card into the reader, entering your card's PIN number, then entering the four digits from your online banking. The reader then generates the password which authorises the transaction.

« Last Edit: December 31, 2014, 01:34:07 am by captainscarlet »
 

Offline miguelvp

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Re: EEVblog #697 - Mailbag
« Reply #34 on: December 31, 2014, 01:35:56 am »
Too rushed for my taste, I still enjoyed it but I did like your previous format better including the 2 minute teardowns that probably take you at least 30 minutes to film and process.
 

Offline NiHaoMike

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Re: EEVblog #697 - Mailbag
« Reply #35 on: December 31, 2014, 01:53:13 am »
We have safety outlets that are similar here in the US.  They look just like the regular outlets that mount in the wall boxes.  I have installed them in the Granddaughter's bedroom so she can't stick anything in them.  They work very well.  In fact, it takes a bit of effort to insert a plug into them, I was not able to put anything else into them.  I probably could have with some excessive force but the granddaughter can't.  That made her momma and SWMBO very happy.
They're a bit of a pain when you need to measure the mains voltage. The solution is quite simple - insert a plug halfway and there's the nicely exposed mains terminals that are easily probed.
Cryptocurrency has taught me to love math and at the same time be baffled by it.

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Offline Rasz

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Re: EEVblog #697 - Mailbag
« Reply #36 on: December 31, 2014, 02:29:36 am »
Is this compression for 720p ok? I think it used to be quite sharp. Is it a youtube issue?




Alexander.

its not compression, its very very slow autofocus, Dave says in the video he is too laz^^^^doesnt know how to se^^^^^^camera is running in auto mode :)


We have safety outlets that are similar here in the US.  They look just like the regular outlets that mount in the wall boxes.  I have installed them in the Granddaughter's bedroom so she can't stick anything in them.  They work very well.  In fact, it takes a bit of effort to insert a plug into them, I was not able to put anything else into them.  I probably could have with some excessive force but the granddaughter can't.  That made her momma and SWMBO very happy.
They're a bit of a pain when you need to measure the mains voltage. The solution is quite simple - insert a plug halfway and there's the nicely exposed mains terminals that are easily probed.

proper plugs have shrouds preventing you from doing that
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Offline N2IXK

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Re: EEVblog #697 - Mailbag
« Reply #37 on: December 31, 2014, 04:22:39 am »
In the US, shuttered mains receptacles (we call them "Tamper Resistant" or "TR") are now mandated for many locations in new installations. The quality of the available units ranges from reasonably good to piss-poor, just like most wiring devices. As not all US plugs incorporate the ground pin, the ground pin cannot be used to unlock the shutter. The units have spring loaded sliders, and are apparently a real PITA for older folks with arthritis to use.  Unintended consequences of making things a bit safer from kids tying to stick stuff into the outlet.  For years a standard part of "babyproofing" has been to install the plastic safety caps over any receptacles at baby height. 

Did anyone notice the font used on that generic "Carcam" label looks a LOT like the Canon label used on their gear? :-DD

Another thumbs up for 2 minute teardowns or powerups within the mailbag for the little stuff that doesn't warrant its own segment.



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Offline RobertoLG

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Re: EEVblog #697 - Mailbag
« Reply #38 on: December 31, 2014, 05:32:32 am »
I think that this wiil be of interest to some here, about synths too "Synth Britannia"

http://youtu.be/pqq2uMrrl4o
 

Offline timelessbeing

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Re: EEVblog #697 - Mailbag
« Reply #39 on: December 31, 2014, 10:07:48 am »
Due to rules in Australia on sales of knives to minors, importation of knives and daggers is restricted, and customs could have confiscated those scalpels.
Same for laser pointers!  They're trying to take away all our fun things one by one...  |O
http://www.customs.gov.au/site/page4369.asp

I don't see scalpels listed on the page you linked. It sounds like it only applies to weapons.

Quote from: AustralianCustoms
Knives and daggers (restricted import)
Description:

Daggers, automatic knives, single handed opening knives, butterfly knives, trench knives, ballistic knives, concealed knives/blades, throwing knives/blades/axes, star knives, push knives, sheath knives, non-metallic knives
 

Offline Fungus

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Re: EEVblog #697 - Mailbag
« Reply #40 on: December 31, 2014, 10:47:48 am »
You know that none of your German listeners will be able to pronounce "squiz", right...?

 

Offline coderAndHackerNW

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Re: EEVblog #697 - Mailbag
« Reply #41 on: December 31, 2014, 01:47:12 pm »
I like mailbags with 2-minute tear-downs.
I like mailbags without the tear-downs.
It's like ice-cream: vanilla, chocolate, strawberry are all good, just different. :-)
 

Offline vlad777

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Re: EEVblog #697 - Mailbag
« Reply #42 on: December 31, 2014, 03:04:15 pm »


33:52 (EEVblog time). GRiD laptops are used in film Aliens from 1986.
I wondered how come I am seeing a laptop in a such an old movie?
Now I know. Thanks EEVblog!
1:29:59 and 1:37:38 (movie time) Aliens (1986) Extended Cut.

Look at that slick and sexy design, and it had a solid state drive too (bubble memory).
I grew up looking at pixels and for me they spell awesome computer stuff.
Nowadays you look at your monitor and it's all perfect.
Not that I'm complaining, but it's a different feeling.
 
Check out the specs:
http://www.rugged-portable.com/history-portable-computers-rugged-bias/grid-compass/
http://www.flickr.com/photos/niallkennedy/113340281/#
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Offline brian

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Re: EEVblog #697 - Mailbag
« Reply #43 on: December 31, 2014, 04:19:07 pm »
I like how the mailbags have been done in the past.  The mini teardowns keeps the mailbags interesting, which is then why I watch them.  Just opening the mail isn't as exciting.  If you break things apart, are people going to tend to just watch the mini-teardowns instead, figuring that's where all the truly interesting stuff is happening?  Also you'd be introducing the small items twice, which seems a little wasteful if your time is limited.
 

Offline Circuitous

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Re: EEVblog #697 - Mailbag
« Reply #44 on: December 31, 2014, 05:14:24 pm »
I like the new mailbag approach.   I really appreciated the comments about the cameras.   I was thinking about getting a better camera and the G30 looked good,  but then you got a Sony. 

Offline MLXXXp

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Re: EEVblog #697 - Mailbag
« Reply #45 on: December 31, 2014, 06:58:34 pm »
An interesting note about the crappy calculator is that its case design is that of an old Casio fx-82LB calculator.
http://www.casio-calculator.com/Museum/Pages/FFF/FX-82LB/Casio%20FX-82LB.html
http://www.calculator.org/pages/calculator.aspx?model=fx-82LB&make=Casio

I guess they either re-purposed the original molds or used a Casio fx-82LB calculator as a model for them. They removed the two centre keys on the top row, and the key layout and actual operation is different than the original, so the electronics are different. Also, I think they improved it by adding a removable cover for the batteries (2 x AA as with the original). With the original you had to remove screws and the entire back to change the batteries.

The reason I know about the case is because I bought one, also from a dollar store in Ontario, Canada. However, the label above the display, that reads "Scientific Calculator" on Dave's, on mine reads "fx-82LB FRACTION", in the same fonts as the original, but with the word "CASIO" removed and the word "FRACTION" in white instead of blue. Mine came with a hinged hard plastic cover attached, which flips around to the back for use, as the original Casio fx-82LB had. I suspect the one Dave received also originally had the same cover (They tend to break off easily).

What I found funny about mine is that it doesn't actually have the capability to work with fractions. ::)

P.S. The Ontario city Mississauga is generally pronounced miss iss saw guh.
 

Offline dentaku

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Re: EEVblog #697 - Mailbag
« Reply #46 on: December 31, 2014, 07:23:32 pm »
I'd also like to add that I like the 2 minute (few minute) teardowns as longs as they don't turn into full reviews like the EMI probe segment which really could have been their own video.
You can't just frantically open boxes all the time. Maybe you should cut them all open first before recording then you won't have to spend so much time on camera cutting tape and envelopes.
It's the stuff inside the boxes that counts.
 

Offline miguelvp

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Re: EEVblog #697 - Mailbag
« Reply #47 on: December 31, 2014, 07:25:29 pm »
That looks so close to my Sharp EL-512, which is in some box somewhere but I found a picture in the interwebs. As a programmer I did need a programmer's calculator and to me that was the best I could afford at the time.


 

Offline kjn4685

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Re: EEVblog #697 - Mailbag
« Reply #48 on: December 31, 2014, 07:48:52 pm »
 :clap: I like the teardown the way you doing it. And hey HAPPY NEW YEAR DAVE
 

Offline Retep

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Re: EEVblog #697 - Mailbag
« Reply #49 on: December 31, 2014, 07:53:42 pm »
A guy opening envelops with a big knife isn't that interesting to me, the fun wears of after having seen that a couple of times. The mini teardowns is what keeps me from skipping the mailbag videos altogether. I do appreciate Daves effort, but in my opinion the EE content on the EEVBlog is already rather sparse.

Happy New Year to everyone!
 

Offline Muttley Snickers

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Re: EEVblog #697 - Mailbag
« Reply #50 on: December 31, 2014, 09:43:09 pm »
The knife was a fun idea but time to move on. It may be theatrical, but it slows you down.

I'm not a fan of the knife,

Just to dangerous if his son happens to get hold of it or if it falls of the bench and takes off a toe.

Some of the stuff he receives deserve's to be opened or examined with a chainsaw.    :-DD

Muttley
« Last Edit: December 31, 2014, 10:38:37 pm by Muttley Snickers »
 

Offline artag

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Re: EEVblog #697 - Mailbag
« Reply #51 on: January 01, 2015, 02:14:32 am »
They're a bit of a pain when you need to measure the mains voltage. The solution is quite simple - insert a plug halfway and there's the nicely exposed mains terminals that are easily probed.

If that doesn't work, you can get one of these handy gadgets to hold the shutters open :

http://www.fatallyflawed.org.uk/
 

Offline PinheadBE

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Re: EEVblog #697 - Mailbag
« Reply #52 on: January 01, 2015, 11:41:21 am »
This last mailbag was painful to watch: too fast, Dave definitely having no fun at all at doing it, a lot of frustration because of the lack of teardowns (which, IMHO, are the most interesting segments).
So, no, sorry, no thumbs up for this new format.

The "A"-"B" idea explained above could do the trick, however, I preferred the more classical format, done on a more relaxed pace where you should take the time to appreciate and show the items (btw, get rid of that autofocus camera-toy!), tearing them down if it's worth it...

I realize that this takes time, but maybe you could shoot the segments on different days (the mailbag openings all in a row on one day, and the teardowns on another, and then edit the all thing together).

And please, .... ranting is sometimes needed, indeed.  But, hey: cool down a bit.  There are positive things, too....

Keep up the good job: EEVBlog remains one of the very best technical video blogs ever!

EDIT: And, oh yeah: HAPPY NEW YEAR !!!
« Last Edit: January 01, 2015, 11:44:32 am by PinheadBE »
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Offline classical

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Re: EEVblog #697 - Mailbag
« Reply #53 on: January 01, 2015, 12:36:12 pm »
It is very commendable to ask the audience for its opinion.
But please remain who you are.
Many people send mail. And that is fantastic and should not become a burden.
Take the time you need to treat things in your way .
And if one Mailbag Monday is not enough: What prevents you from establishing an additional Mailbag time?
 

Online bitwelder

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Re: EEVblog #697 - Mailbag
« Reply #54 on: January 01, 2015, 03:23:35 pm »
I also liked more the usual Mailbags with no rush to open all parcels and with some 2-minutes teardowns, together. If there is too much to do, well, better to have an extra Mailbag mixed segment from time to time.
The mini-teardown should happen right away, not postponed towards the end, and also I think Dave should get himself a good 2-minutes beeper+LED timer so he'll get a reminder if he's starting to blab too much.

I'd like to see the Return of the Swiss Army Knife, a much more appropriate instrument for a EE Pro.

Honestly (as I'm no content producer) I have *no* interest in hearing what kind of video equipment Dave is using, and also the recent upgrade to 50-60 fps left me very much "meh".

As suggestion, the postcards could be collected and shown in a final steady shot of a few seconds at the end of the Mailbag segment
 

Offline Tandy

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Re: EEVblog #697 - Mailbag
« Reply #55 on: January 01, 2015, 06:45:16 pm »
Like you say it is surprising that the mailbag section is so popular, but I have watched a few and for some reason it is interesting to see what gadgets and gizmos you get especially when people try and trip you up with things like UK plugs and sockets.

Perhaps one thing that would help you get through more items per episode would be to rip open the packaging before you start. I mean yes the Dundee knife is fun and all that but the least interesting bit is watching you cut through tape and bubble wrap to get at something. I'd rather see a couple of minutes of tear down than a couple of minutes of bubble wrap tearing.

But hey just my opinion, doesn't really matter what you do we will probably all still watch it.
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Offline vlad777

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Re: EEVblog #697 - Mailbag
« Reply #56 on: January 01, 2015, 07:00:51 pm »
Dave, if you want to teardown or crack open that bubble memory,
you can use "decapping IC" methods.
They use nitric acid to dissolve epoxy of the chip, but what is inside stays intact.
And your new bunker is the right place to do it.

Cheers!
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Offline f4eru

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Re: EEVblog #697 - Mailbag
« Reply #57 on: January 02, 2015, 01:19:49 am »
In France, the shutters are mandatory since ca. 10 years on new buildings (we have a lot of very strict and enforced rules on new buildings, thanks not to security, but basically to a strong lobbyism from the local appliance industry)

It's becoming mandatory in other EU countries ( with different plugs).
The UK plug is quite crazy, 32A for no good reason means a waste of copper in the house wiring (was it historically 110V?), too big a plug, and so on...

Rant : countries should be standardizing plugs. Aspecially in the EU.
Come on, france and german ones can be easily specified as mandatory compatible, BUT THEY ARE NOT! The same goes for swiss/italian, and so on...
Yeah, we don't care about UK, but if, say, half the EU could use the same plug, it would be that much easier on travel, or when shipping things that got mains power !!
Yeah, there would be a slow change period, but today, adapters are cheap.

Offline DanielS

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Re: EEVblog #697 - Mailbag
« Reply #58 on: January 02, 2015, 01:51:55 am »
For the mailbag format, my vote is: focus on opening stuff in the mailbag segment and then do a mailbag follow-up for the mini-teardowns/reviews for the mailbag items that need one yet do not justify a whole video of their own. If the follow-up segment is too short to justify being its own episode, you could append it to the mailbag episode itself.
 

Offline ShawnD

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Re: EEVblog #697 - Mailbag
« Reply #59 on: January 02, 2015, 02:32:31 am »
Mine came with a hinged hard plastic cover attached, which flips around to the back for use, as the original Casio fx-82LB had. I suspect the one Dave received also originally had the same cover (They tend to break off easily).

I am the one who sent it in.  It did have a flip open cover, but as you suspected it broke off a long time ago due to the low quality plastic. 

 

Offline Stonent

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Re: EEVblog #697 - Mailbag
« Reply #60 on: January 02, 2015, 04:36:36 am »
An interesting note about the crappy calculator is that its case design is that of an old Casio fx-82LB calculator.
http://www.casio-calculator.com/Museum/Pages/FFF/FX-82LB/Casio%20FX-82LB.html
http://www.calculator.org/pages/calculator.aspx?model=fx-82LB&make=Casio

I guess they either re-purposed the original molds or used a Casio fx-82LB calculator as a model for them. They removed the two centre keys on the top row, and the key layout and actual operation is different than the original, so the electronics are different. Also, I think they improved it by adding a removable cover for the batteries (2 x AA as with the original). With the original you had to remove screws and the entire back to change the batteries.

The reason I know about the case is because I bought one, also from a dollar store in Ontario, Canada. However, the label above the display, that reads "Scientific Calculator" on Dave's, on mine reads "fx-82LB FRACTION", in the same fonts as the original, but with the word "CASIO" removed and the word "FRACTION" in white instead of blue. Mine came with a hinged hard plastic cover attached, which flips around to the back for use, as the original Casio fx-82LB had. I suspect the one Dave received also originally had the same cover (They tend to break off easily).

What I found funny about mine is that it doesn't actually have the capability to work with fractions. ::)

P.S. The Ontario city Mississauga is generally pronounced miss iss saw guh.

I'm not sure if it is the same one, but I've definitely seen a Casio fx series knock off at a dollar store in my town.  I thought about buying it and sending it in since he was a Casio guy.  :-DD
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Offline Stonent

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Re: EEVblog #697 - Mailbag
« Reply #61 on: January 02, 2015, 04:42:47 am »
The problem with things that don't get mini tore-down is I often wait for the tear down.

I think the best part about mailbag is when he takes something he receives and assembles/tears it down/plays with it.

*Still waiting for the magazine video insert teardown from a few years back.
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Offline Tandy

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Re: EEVblog #697 - Mailbag
« Reply #62 on: January 02, 2015, 03:55:09 pm »
The UK plug is quite crazy, 32A for no good reason means a waste of copper in the house wiring (was it historically 110V?), too big a plug, and so on...

The current British mains wiring and plug arrangement were developed after the second world war to create a standardised installation throughout the country. Before the war electricity did not have any standards, sockets were often not fitted at all so it was common to see people plug things into the light fitting on the celling. Where sockets were fitted they were typically odd sized 2, 5 and 15A BS 546 socket-outlets.

While each type of plug has its merits the UK system was not developed without good reason. In fact it had a great deal of thought put into it. The IEE committee held 22 meetings between 1942 and 1944 which resulted in the publication of ‘Post War Building Study No. 11 – Electrical Installations’ in January 1944 which led to the UK ring circuit and the development of the BS 1363 13 amp fused, flat-pin plug and socket. It makes very clear the reasoning process at the time which led to our system of plugs and sockets. The study is also remarkable in terms of its foresight changing from a system of different sized sockets for different current ratings to a single plug with an internal fuse allowing for easy interchangeability.

It was realised that Britain would continue to suffer from a massive shortage of raw materials such as copper after the war and using the ring-circuit would result in a saving of approximately 25% compared with pre-war radial circuits. The committee also had the foresight to recognise that the huge increase in demand for electrical appliances meant that there would be a need for more than a single socket outlet in each room in the future. The ring circuit made it possible to easily and cost effectively add additional outlets with minimal additional wiring costs.
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Offline SeanB

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Re: EEVblog #697 - Mailbag
« Reply #63 on: January 02, 2015, 05:28:31 pm »
Thought I would take one apart and put the internals up here.

https://www.eevblog.com/forum/reviews/sa-standard-socket-outlet-internals
 

Offline robrenz

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Re: EEVblog #697 - Mailbag
« Reply #64 on: January 02, 2015, 06:27:42 pm »
How about doing the quick overview style mailbag like this one and you (Dave) include a vote/poll on the thread for which items people would like to see a teardown/deeper look and Then do follow up video of the most popular items from the poll?

Minor constructive criticism. Your current camera is very slow to focus when you hold things up to it for a close up. Often we get teased by it just barely getting focused when you pull away. Suggest waiting a few seconds after it focuses or don't do the close ups.

Offline 3roomlab

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Re: EEVblog #697 - Mailbag
« Reply #65 on: January 03, 2015, 03:21:20 am »
How about doing the quick overview style mailbag like this one and you (Dave) include a vote/poll on the thread for which items people would like to see a teardown/deeper look and Then do follow up video of the most popular items from the poll?

Minor constructive criticism. Your current camera is very slow to focus when you hold things up to it for a close up. Often we get teased by it just barely getting focused when you pull away. Suggest waiting a few seconds after it focuses or don't do the close ups.

yea slow focus is quite ...  |O gah ! some cameras focus faster due to more light, limitation of the focusing sensor ... just like all SLR cameras, going bonkers on focus as light decreases ... hehe time to get a more responsive vid-camera?  :-+ .... i highly encourage ! ... new gear ! new gear ! new gear !
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Offline Stonent

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Re: EEVblog #697 - Mailbag
« Reply #66 on: January 03, 2015, 03:35:01 am »
I was fine with the old mailbag style :)
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Offline Fungus

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Re: EEVblog #697 - Mailbag
« Reply #67 on: January 03, 2015, 09:06:45 am »
(Yeah, somebody probably already posted this, but...)

How to open a British Plug: Insert flatblade screwdriver in earth slot in vertical orientation. Push downwards.




The other reasons that British plugs are the best are:

a) Every single wall socket has an on/off switch (if it's a double socket you get two switches). It's unbelievably handy, I don't know why other countries don't have this.




b) The fuse goes inside the plug. This means that every device has a fuse which is the appropriate rating, you're not dependent on a single massive fuse in the fuse box. Lamps can have a 1A fuse, heaters have a 13A fuse, 3A and 5A fuses are also common.

It also means that when a device fails it doesn't take out everything else in the house (including the lights) leaving you fumbling around the fuse box in the dark.

Fuses are really easy to buy in the UK. Anywhere that sells electrical goods will have some on the sales counter. Most plugs these days have a pop-out fuse holder in the back, like this:



 

Offline vk3yedotcom

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Re: EEVblog #697 - Mailbag
« Reply #68 on: January 03, 2015, 09:28:10 am »

The other reasons that British plugs are the best are:

a) Every single wall socket has an on/off switch (if it's a double socket you get two switches). It's unbelievably handy, I don't know why other countries don't have this.

Our sockets in Australia also have switches.

Quote
b) The fuse goes inside the plug. This means that every device has a fuse which is the appropriate rating, you're not dependent on a single massive fuse in the fuse box. Lamps can have a 1A fuse, heaters have a 13A fuse, 3A and 5A fuses are also common.

It also means that when a device fails it doesn't take out everything else in the house (including the lights) leaving you fumbling around the fuse box in the dark.

It's not foolproof though - can one trust average consumers to replace blown fuses with the correct rating? Or would fuses of different ratings have to be made incompatible sizes?  Though to be fair this is also an issue with the old fusewire/meter box system.
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Offline classical

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Re: EEVblog #697 - Mailbag
« Reply #69 on: January 03, 2015, 12:21:42 pm »
I don't know why other countries don't have this.
Maybe because they have been much earlier with their own standards, eg. the US-Sytem or the german Schuko. Most of the different plugs have their specific disadvantages but apparently they are working. It would be interesting to compare the numbers of accidents or fires per GWh or so to see if there are clear winners in terms of safety.
The british type G seems to be very bulky. In my opinion the fuse in the connector makes not so much sense. The circuit breakers has to protect the lines and not the equipment. The eqipment has to be protected by inernal means. And if an internal fuse is blown the unit has to be inspected and repaired. Changing an external fuse does not repair the system but it gives the possibility to overrate the replacments.

...that British plugs are the best...
Probably not. Otherwise the IEC 60906-1 would not have been created (which is very close to the swiss system btw).

I learned a lot from these posts about the history and the pres and cons of the different systems. Would it make sense to create a special thread?
 

Offline jay

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Re: EEVblog #697 - Mailbag
« Reply #70 on: January 03, 2015, 03:36:45 pm »
I realized only afterwards why I didn't like this episode.. Usually Dave behaves on the mailbag videos as if he isn't busy and allows himself to just go with the flow. Now it was too much like real life: always in a hurry trying to be efficient.

Dave, you really need a system for organizing the mail based on urgency, arrival date etc. Instead of hiring the technically most competent assistant it could be useful to hire someone who likes to organize things :) I bet you don't even remember every single test & measurement gear you have in the lab :-DD

I don't get why someone didn't like the part with the EMC probes in the previous mailbag. I found it most interesting because I had never seen such probes.. Probably familiar for the pros but I think there are lot of hobbyists watching.
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Offline SNGLinks

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Re: EEVblog #697 - Mailbag
« Reply #71 on: January 03, 2015, 03:51:11 pm »

The british type G seems to be very bulky. In my opinion the fuse in the connector makes not so much sense. The circuit breakers has to protect the lines and not the equipment. The eqipment has to be protected by inernal means. And if an internal fuse is blown the unit has to be inspected and repaired. Changing an external fuse does not repair the system but it gives the possibility to overrate the replacments.


The plug fuse is to protect the lead, if there was no fuse then the lead under fault conditions would only be protected by the 32A ring main breaker.
I've had an HP sig gen with a shorted IEC mains filter. If it wasn't for the plug fuse then the lead and the IEC filter could be taking 32A!
 

Offline classical

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Re: EEVblog #697 - Mailbag
« Reply #72 on: January 03, 2015, 05:02:48 pm »
The plug fuse is to protect the lead, if there was no fuse then the lead under fault conditions would only be protected by the 32A ring main breaker.
Ok, the 32 ring concept seems to have its own properties.
Do I understand correctly: The British system protects with 32A up to the plug. Starting with the plug it begins another world which has to protect itself by using the fuse in the plug? This would makes sense to me.
 

Offline Tandy

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Re: EEVblog #697 - Mailbag
« Reply #73 on: January 03, 2015, 07:02:46 pm »
Yes this is how it works.

The 32A protects the entire ring circuit to prevent the house wiring from being overloaded.

This means in theory you could draw 32A from any outlet before tripping the circuit protector. You would therefore need a flex capable of carrying 32A to your equipment. Fitting a 13A fuse (the largest available) in the plug means that the cable must be capable of carrying only 13A. Now I believe in most European countries it is common to use unfused plugs and a 15A radial circuit so all your cables must be capable of carrying 15A up to the point of the internal fuse in a device.

The UK system allows for example a lamp to have a thin and therefore more flexible and less obtrusive 3A rated cable if the plug is fitted with a 3A fuse. This is a good system most of the time however there is one flaw in it, that is the fuses are all the same physical size, so an uniformed consumer could replace the fuse with a higher rating putting the supply cable at risk of causing fire. It just needed one little revision making fuses different shapes/sizes to prevent incorrect fuse fitment to have made it complete.

As a result most products manufactured by safety conscious manufacturers fit a 13A capable cable to all appliances anyway to remove this risk.
« Last Edit: January 03, 2015, 07:06:36 pm by Tandy »
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Offline nitro2k01

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Re: EEVblog #697 - Mailbag
« Reply #74 on: January 04, 2015, 10:10:25 am »
This is a good system most of the time however there is one flaw in it, that is the fuses are all the same physical size, so an uniformed consumer could replace the fuse with a higher rating putting the supply cable at risk of causing fire. It just needed one little revision making fuses different shapes/sizes to prevent incorrect fuse fitment to have made it complete.
Would it be against code to make a plug with a smaller physical fuse size, or is the requirement simply that the plug needs to be fused? (Ie, is the equal fuse size a rule or just a recommendation?)
« Last Edit: January 04, 2015, 10:12:57 am by nitro2k01 »
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Offline Thilo78

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Re: EEVblog #697 - Mailbag
« Reply #75 on: January 04, 2015, 10:30:40 am »
[...]
 Now I believe in most European countries it is common to use unfused plugs and a 15A radial circuit so all your cables must be capable of carrying 15A up to the point of the internal fuse in a device.
[...]

That's correct, at least for what I can tell for Germany.

Usually in domestic installation (industrial or power distribution will be significally different), you will have a distribution system, which is not accessible to the common user.
Only the final distribution board, located e.g. in the apartment, would be accessible to the user.
Also, we do not use fuses, but Miniature Circuit Breakers, which can be safely operated without accessing the actual circuitry or exposing live parts.

Most commonly, the distribution board will be supplied via a 32A MCB, located in the house's MDB. (Old MDBs might still have screw-in fuses of D02 type)
Behind that, you will have 16 A MCBs for sockets and lighting, and maybe some 20A or 25A 3-phase MCB for stoves and heating.
Thus, all the installation has to be rated for 16A up to the socket (which has to be of Schuko type).
From there you can deviate. Schuko will always be 16A rated, the smaller Euro plug is 5A rated, if I remember correctly.

Mobile appliances might have additional fuses inside, if this is necessary due to their rating. A common use here is a glass fuse rated 250V with smaller amps rating like 200mA, 500mA, 1A etc.

btw: As far as I know, the British Standard ring structure is illegal in Germany. (Correct me, if I'm wrong)
 

Offline SeanB

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Re: EEVblog #697 - Mailbag
« Reply #76 on: January 04, 2015, 10:38:32 am »
Only 32A mains supply! Here the standard is an 80A breaker in the tap off unit after the meter, and a consumer side 60A breaker. On overhead lines the fuse is typically 100A, just because of the derating required to carry 60A at high ambient in summer. 16mm cable to the consumer distribution board, then socket outlets are supplied ( after the mandatory ground fault breaker) via 20A breakers, using 2.5mm cabling. Stoves and water heating are supplied via a dedicated breaker for each, typically 40A for the stove and 20A for the water heater. Lighting is done with 1.5mm cable using typically a 10A breaker.
 

Offline Tandy

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Re: EEVblog #697 - Mailbag
« Reply #77 on: January 04, 2015, 11:59:09 am »
Would it be against code to make a plug with a smaller physical fuse size, or is the requirement simply that the plug needs to be fused? (Ie, is the equal fuse size a rule or just a recommendation?)
Unfortunately the fuse type is covered by the regulation BS1362.
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Offline fvdpol

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Re: EEVblog #697 - Mailbag
« Reply #78 on: January 04, 2015, 02:19:53 pm »
.....
As suggestion, the postcards could be collected and shown in a final steady shot of a few seconds at the end of the Mailbag segment

Second for that! Great idea!
 

Offline PinheadBE

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Re: EEVblog #697 - Mailbag
« Reply #79 on: January 05, 2015, 09:05:25 am »

a) Every single wall socket has an on/off switch (if it's a double socket you get two switches). It's unbelievably handy, I don't know why other countries don't have this.

Absolutely!  :-+
I'd like to see this on our european sockets as well.
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Offline Stonent

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Re: EEVblog #697 - Mailbag
« Reply #80 on: January 06, 2015, 03:49:23 pm »
The UK system allows for example a lamp to have a thin and therefore more flexible and less obtrusive 3A rated cable if the plug is fitted with a 3A fuse.

With a massive plug on the end :)
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Offline lewis

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Re: EEVblog #697 - Mailbag
« Reply #81 on: January 06, 2015, 09:56:16 pm »
With a massive plug on the end :)

There is no single pain on this earth greater than standing on an upturned BS1363 barefoot in the early hours of the morning.
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Offline deth502

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Re: EEVblog #697 - Mailbag
« Reply #82 on: January 07, 2015, 12:16:21 am »
The shutters on that socket are indeed activated by the earth pin. They're a one-piece plastic moulding in a runner, with a bevelled tip for the earth pin. They simply get pushed out of the way against a spring when you insert the plug.

By the way, you seem to have been attempting to check continuity between contacts and terminals with the switch off. Not only were you probing the line pin, but that is almost certainly a dual pole switch, so even with the shutters open, you'd get nowhere like that on either side. ;)

If you want to open it you'll have to drill out the rivets holding the earth bar on the back, the ones in the screw holes. Alternatively, just crack the whole plate off with a hammer or something.

E: Actually, that may be a socket which requires both live pins to open the shutter, not the earth. More prone to jamming.


only read the first page, so i dont know if this was mentioned or not, but there are similar plugs in the us now. i bought a pack of 10 by accident during a recent rewire job, and i must say, they are absolutely horrible. you nearly need a hammer to get the plugs inserted, and once the plastic shutters give way, it sounds like they have just snapped and broke off. but no such luck, they are still there.
 

Offline Monkeh

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Re: EEVblog #697 - Mailbag
« Reply #83 on: January 07, 2015, 03:37:00 am »
only read the first page, so i dont know if this was mentioned or not, but there are similar plugs in the us now. i bought a pack of 10 by accident during a recent rewire job, and i must say, they are absolutely horrible. you nearly need a hammer to get the plugs inserted, and once the plastic shutters give way, it sounds like they have just snapped and broke off. but no such luck, they are still there.

Continuing the US tradition of having the worst electrical accessories in the world, I see.
 

Offline itdontgo

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Re: EEVblog #697 - Mailbag
« Reply #84 on: January 08, 2015, 12:56:11 pm »
The mini-teardowns are the best bit of mail bag.  I can open my own mail  ;)

Offline hikariuk

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Re: EEVblog #697 - Mailbag
« Reply #85 on: January 08, 2015, 04:26:58 pm »
The UK plug is quite crazy, 32A for no good reason means a waste of copper in the house wiring (was it historically 110V?), too big a plug, and so on...

Actually UK wiring is done using ring circuits specifically to save copper in the post WW2 period.  A 30A fuse used to be used to be protect the circuit, nowadays it's a 32A breaker. 

Mains voltage has been 240V since the national grid was created way back whenever, afaik.  Before that there were various voltages and connectors in use.
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Offline hikariuk

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Re: EEVblog #697 - Mailbag
« Reply #86 on: January 08, 2015, 04:28:35 pm »
Only 32A mains supply! Here the standard is an 80A breaker in the tap off unit after the meter, and a consumer side 60A breaker. On overhead lines the

The incoming supply in the UK is 100A.
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Offline Monkeh

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Re: EEVblog #697 - Mailbag
« Reply #87 on: January 08, 2015, 04:32:01 pm »
Only 32A mains supply! Here the standard is an 80A breaker in the tap off unit after the meter, and a consumer side 60A breaker. On overhead lines the

The incoming supply in the UK is 100A.

Or 60A, or 80A, or more, or less. Single phase, split phase, three phase..

There is no one type of supply.
 

Offline EvilGeniusSkis

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Re: EEVblog #697 - Mailbag
« Reply #88 on: January 23, 2015, 03:00:37 am »
In Canada have the plugs in our kitchens are wired so that in a standard duplex receptacle  the top and bottom sockets are on different phases and fed from a 2 pole breaker but share a common neutral in addition to this, each receptacle in a kitchen has it's own breaker. This has 2 advantages, 1 is that you can plug 2 high power appliances in to the same receptacle at the same time (ex: coffee maker and a toaster) without the breaker blowing, the 2nd it that the current that the neutral carries is only the difference between the currents used by the two appliances. [ex: if one appliance draws 10A and the other draws 4A then the neutral only carries 6A]
here is a picture i found explaining it
 


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