Author Topic: EEVblog #697 - Mailbag  (Read 32565 times)

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Offline Muttley Snickers

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Re: EEVblog #697 - Mailbag
« Reply #50 on: December 31, 2014, 09:43:09 pm »
The knife was a fun idea but time to move on. It may be theatrical, but it slows you down.

I'm not a fan of the knife,

Just to dangerous if his son happens to get hold of it or if it falls of the bench and takes off a toe.

Some of the stuff he receives deserve's to be opened or examined with a chainsaw.    :-DD

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« Last Edit: December 31, 2014, 10:38:37 pm by Muttley Snickers »
 

Offline artag

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Re: EEVblog #697 - Mailbag
« Reply #51 on: January 01, 2015, 02:14:32 am »
They're a bit of a pain when you need to measure the mains voltage. The solution is quite simple - insert a plug halfway and there's the nicely exposed mains terminals that are easily probed.

If that doesn't work, you can get one of these handy gadgets to hold the shutters open :

http://www.fatallyflawed.org.uk/
 

Offline PinheadBE

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Re: EEVblog #697 - Mailbag
« Reply #52 on: January 01, 2015, 11:41:21 am »
This last mailbag was painful to watch: too fast, Dave definitely having no fun at all at doing it, a lot of frustration because of the lack of teardowns (which, IMHO, are the most interesting segments).
So, no, sorry, no thumbs up for this new format.

The "A"-"B" idea explained above could do the trick, however, I preferred the more classical format, done on a more relaxed pace where you should take the time to appreciate and show the items (btw, get rid of that autofocus camera-toy!), tearing them down if it's worth it...

I realize that this takes time, but maybe you could shoot the segments on different days (the mailbag openings all in a row on one day, and the teardowns on another, and then edit the all thing together).

And please, .... ranting is sometimes needed, indeed.  But, hey: cool down a bit.  There are positive things, too....

Keep up the good job: EEVBlog remains one of the very best technical video blogs ever!

EDIT: And, oh yeah: HAPPY NEW YEAR !!!
« Last Edit: January 01, 2015, 11:44:32 am by PinheadBE »
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Offline classical

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Re: EEVblog #697 - Mailbag
« Reply #53 on: January 01, 2015, 12:36:12 pm »
It is very commendable to ask the audience for its opinion.
But please remain who you are.
Many people send mail. And that is fantastic and should not become a burden.
Take the time you need to treat things in your way .
And if one Mailbag Monday is not enough: What prevents you from establishing an additional Mailbag time?
 

Offline bitwelder

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Re: EEVblog #697 - Mailbag
« Reply #54 on: January 01, 2015, 03:23:35 pm »
I also liked more the usual Mailbags with no rush to open all parcels and with some 2-minutes teardowns, together. If there is too much to do, well, better to have an extra Mailbag mixed segment from time to time.
The mini-teardown should happen right away, not postponed towards the end, and also I think Dave should get himself a good 2-minutes beeper+LED timer so he'll get a reminder if he's starting to blab too much.

I'd like to see the Return of the Swiss Army Knife, a much more appropriate instrument for a EE Pro.

Honestly (as I'm no content producer) I have *no* interest in hearing what kind of video equipment Dave is using, and also the recent upgrade to 50-60 fps left me very much "meh".

As suggestion, the postcards could be collected and shown in a final steady shot of a few seconds at the end of the Mailbag segment
 

Offline Tandy

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Re: EEVblog #697 - Mailbag
« Reply #55 on: January 01, 2015, 06:45:16 pm »
Like you say it is surprising that the mailbag section is so popular, but I have watched a few and for some reason it is interesting to see what gadgets and gizmos you get especially when people try and trip you up with things like UK plugs and sockets.

Perhaps one thing that would help you get through more items per episode would be to rip open the packaging before you start. I mean yes the Dundee knife is fun and all that but the least interesting bit is watching you cut through tape and bubble wrap to get at something. I'd rather see a couple of minutes of tear down than a couple of minutes of bubble wrap tearing.

But hey just my opinion, doesn't really matter what you do we will probably all still watch it.
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Offline vlad777

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Re: EEVblog #697 - Mailbag
« Reply #56 on: January 01, 2015, 07:00:51 pm »
Dave, if you want to teardown or crack open that bubble memory,
you can use "decapping IC" methods.
They use nitric acid to dissolve epoxy of the chip, but what is inside stays intact.
And your new bunker is the right place to do it.

Cheers!
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Offline f4eru

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Re: EEVblog #697 - Mailbag
« Reply #57 on: January 02, 2015, 01:19:49 am »
In France, the shutters are mandatory since ca. 10 years on new buildings (we have a lot of very strict and enforced rules on new buildings, thanks not to security, but basically to a strong lobbyism from the local appliance industry)

It's becoming mandatory in other EU countries ( with different plugs).
The UK plug is quite crazy, 32A for no good reason means a waste of copper in the house wiring (was it historically 110V?), too big a plug, and so on...

Rant : countries should be standardizing plugs. Aspecially in the EU.
Come on, france and german ones can be easily specified as mandatory compatible, BUT THEY ARE NOT! The same goes for swiss/italian, and so on...
Yeah, we don't care about UK, but if, say, half the EU could use the same plug, it would be that much easier on travel, or when shipping things that got mains power !!
Yeah, there would be a slow change period, but today, adapters are cheap.

Offline DanielS

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Re: EEVblog #697 - Mailbag
« Reply #58 on: January 02, 2015, 01:51:55 am »
For the mailbag format, my vote is: focus on opening stuff in the mailbag segment and then do a mailbag follow-up for the mini-teardowns/reviews for the mailbag items that need one yet do not justify a whole video of their own. If the follow-up segment is too short to justify being its own episode, you could append it to the mailbag episode itself.
 

Offline ShawnD

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Re: EEVblog #697 - Mailbag
« Reply #59 on: January 02, 2015, 02:32:31 am »
Mine came with a hinged hard plastic cover attached, which flips around to the back for use, as the original Casio fx-82LB had. I suspect the one Dave received also originally had the same cover (They tend to break off easily).

I am the one who sent it in.  It did have a flip open cover, but as you suspected it broke off a long time ago due to the low quality plastic. 

 

Offline Stonent

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Re: EEVblog #697 - Mailbag
« Reply #60 on: January 02, 2015, 04:36:36 am »
An interesting note about the crappy calculator is that its case design is that of an old Casio fx-82LB calculator.
http://www.casio-calculator.com/Museum/Pages/FFF/FX-82LB/Casio%20FX-82LB.html
http://www.calculator.org/pages/calculator.aspx?model=fx-82LB&make=Casio

I guess they either re-purposed the original molds or used a Casio fx-82LB calculator as a model for them. They removed the two centre keys on the top row, and the key layout and actual operation is different than the original, so the electronics are different. Also, I think they improved it by adding a removable cover for the batteries (2 x AA as with the original). With the original you had to remove screws and the entire back to change the batteries.

The reason I know about the case is because I bought one, also from a dollar store in Ontario, Canada. However, the label above the display, that reads "Scientific Calculator" on Dave's, on mine reads "fx-82LB FRACTION", in the same fonts as the original, but with the word "CASIO" removed and the word "FRACTION" in white instead of blue. Mine came with a hinged hard plastic cover attached, which flips around to the back for use, as the original Casio fx-82LB had. I suspect the one Dave received also originally had the same cover (They tend to break off easily).

What I found funny about mine is that it doesn't actually have the capability to work with fractions. ::)

P.S. The Ontario city Mississauga is generally pronounced miss iss saw guh.

I'm not sure if it is the same one, but I've definitely seen a Casio fx series knock off at a dollar store in my town.  I thought about buying it and sending it in since he was a Casio guy.  :-DD
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Offline Stonent

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Re: EEVblog #697 - Mailbag
« Reply #61 on: January 02, 2015, 04:42:47 am »
The problem with things that don't get mini tore-down is I often wait for the tear down.

I think the best part about mailbag is when he takes something he receives and assembles/tears it down/plays with it.

*Still waiting for the magazine video insert teardown from a few years back.
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Offline Tandy

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Re: EEVblog #697 - Mailbag
« Reply #62 on: January 02, 2015, 03:55:09 pm »
The UK plug is quite crazy, 32A for no good reason means a waste of copper in the house wiring (was it historically 110V?), too big a plug, and so on...

The current British mains wiring and plug arrangement were developed after the second world war to create a standardised installation throughout the country. Before the war electricity did not have any standards, sockets were often not fitted at all so it was common to see people plug things into the light fitting on the celling. Where sockets were fitted they were typically odd sized 2, 5 and 15A BS 546 socket-outlets.

While each type of plug has its merits the UK system was not developed without good reason. In fact it had a great deal of thought put into it. The IEE committee held 22 meetings between 1942 and 1944 which resulted in the publication of ‘Post War Building Study No. 11 – Electrical Installations’ in January 1944 which led to the UK ring circuit and the development of the BS 1363 13 amp fused, flat-pin plug and socket. It makes very clear the reasoning process at the time which led to our system of plugs and sockets. The study is also remarkable in terms of its foresight changing from a system of different sized sockets for different current ratings to a single plug with an internal fuse allowing for easy interchangeability.

It was realised that Britain would continue to suffer from a massive shortage of raw materials such as copper after the war and using the ring-circuit would result in a saving of approximately 25% compared with pre-war radial circuits. The committee also had the foresight to recognise that the huge increase in demand for electrical appliances meant that there would be a need for more than a single socket outlet in each room in the future. The ring circuit made it possible to easily and cost effectively add additional outlets with minimal additional wiring costs.
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Offline SeanB

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Re: EEVblog #697 - Mailbag
« Reply #63 on: January 02, 2015, 05:28:31 pm »
Thought I would take one apart and put the internals up here.

https://www.eevblog.com/forum/reviews/sa-standard-socket-outlet-internals
 

Offline robrenz

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Re: EEVblog #697 - Mailbag
« Reply #64 on: January 02, 2015, 06:27:42 pm »
How about doing the quick overview style mailbag like this one and you (Dave) include a vote/poll on the thread for which items people would like to see a teardown/deeper look and Then do follow up video of the most popular items from the poll?

Minor constructive criticism. Your current camera is very slow to focus when you hold things up to it for a close up. Often we get teased by it just barely getting focused when you pull away. Suggest waiting a few seconds after it focuses or don't do the close ups.

Offline 3roomlab

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Re: EEVblog #697 - Mailbag
« Reply #65 on: January 03, 2015, 03:21:20 am »
How about doing the quick overview style mailbag like this one and you (Dave) include a vote/poll on the thread for which items people would like to see a teardown/deeper look and Then do follow up video of the most popular items from the poll?

Minor constructive criticism. Your current camera is very slow to focus when you hold things up to it for a close up. Often we get teased by it just barely getting focused when you pull away. Suggest waiting a few seconds after it focuses or don't do the close ups.

yea slow focus is quite ...  |O gah ! some cameras focus faster due to more light, limitation of the focusing sensor ... just like all SLR cameras, going bonkers on focus as light decreases ... hehe time to get a more responsive vid-camera?  :-+ .... i highly encourage ! ... new gear ! new gear ! new gear !
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Offline Stonent

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Re: EEVblog #697 - Mailbag
« Reply #66 on: January 03, 2015, 03:35:01 am »
I was fine with the old mailbag style :)
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Offline Fungus

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Re: EEVblog #697 - Mailbag
« Reply #67 on: January 03, 2015, 09:06:45 am »
(Yeah, somebody probably already posted this, but...)

How to open a British Plug: Insert flatblade screwdriver in earth slot in vertical orientation. Push downwards.




The other reasons that British plugs are the best are:

a) Every single wall socket has an on/off switch (if it's a double socket you get two switches). It's unbelievably handy, I don't know why other countries don't have this.




b) The fuse goes inside the plug. This means that every device has a fuse which is the appropriate rating, you're not dependent on a single massive fuse in the fuse box. Lamps can have a 1A fuse, heaters have a 13A fuse, 3A and 5A fuses are also common.

It also means that when a device fails it doesn't take out everything else in the house (including the lights) leaving you fumbling around the fuse box in the dark.

Fuses are really easy to buy in the UK. Anywhere that sells electrical goods will have some on the sales counter. Most plugs these days have a pop-out fuse holder in the back, like this:



 

Offline vk3yedotcom

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Re: EEVblog #697 - Mailbag
« Reply #68 on: January 03, 2015, 09:28:10 am »

The other reasons that British plugs are the best are:

a) Every single wall socket has an on/off switch (if it's a double socket you get two switches). It's unbelievably handy, I don't know why other countries don't have this.

Our sockets in Australia also have switches.

Quote
b) The fuse goes inside the plug. This means that every device has a fuse which is the appropriate rating, you're not dependent on a single massive fuse in the fuse box. Lamps can have a 1A fuse, heaters have a 13A fuse, 3A and 5A fuses are also common.

It also means that when a device fails it doesn't take out everything else in the house (including the lights) leaving you fumbling around the fuse box in the dark.

It's not foolproof though - can one trust average consumers to replace blown fuses with the correct rating? Or would fuses of different ratings have to be made incompatible sizes?  Though to be fair this is also an issue with the old fusewire/meter box system.
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Offline classical

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Re: EEVblog #697 - Mailbag
« Reply #69 on: January 03, 2015, 12:21:42 pm »
I don't know why other countries don't have this.
Maybe because they have been much earlier with their own standards, eg. the US-Sytem or the german Schuko. Most of the different plugs have their specific disadvantages but apparently they are working. It would be interesting to compare the numbers of accidents or fires per GWh or so to see if there are clear winners in terms of safety.
The british type G seems to be very bulky. In my opinion the fuse in the connector makes not so much sense. The circuit breakers has to protect the lines and not the equipment. The eqipment has to be protected by inernal means. And if an internal fuse is blown the unit has to be inspected and repaired. Changing an external fuse does not repair the system but it gives the possibility to overrate the replacments.

...that British plugs are the best...
Probably not. Otherwise the IEC 60906-1 would not have been created (which is very close to the swiss system btw).

I learned a lot from these posts about the history and the pres and cons of the different systems. Would it make sense to create a special thread?
 

Offline jay

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Re: EEVblog #697 - Mailbag
« Reply #70 on: January 03, 2015, 03:36:45 pm »
I realized only afterwards why I didn't like this episode.. Usually Dave behaves on the mailbag videos as if he isn't busy and allows himself to just go with the flow. Now it was too much like real life: always in a hurry trying to be efficient.

Dave, you really need a system for organizing the mail based on urgency, arrival date etc. Instead of hiring the technically most competent assistant it could be useful to hire someone who likes to organize things :) I bet you don't even remember every single test & measurement gear you have in the lab :-DD

I don't get why someone didn't like the part with the EMC probes in the previous mailbag. I found it most interesting because I had never seen such probes.. Probably familiar for the pros but I think there are lot of hobbyists watching.
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Offline SNGLinks

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Re: EEVblog #697 - Mailbag
« Reply #71 on: January 03, 2015, 03:51:11 pm »

The british type G seems to be very bulky. In my opinion the fuse in the connector makes not so much sense. The circuit breakers has to protect the lines and not the equipment. The eqipment has to be protected by inernal means. And if an internal fuse is blown the unit has to be inspected and repaired. Changing an external fuse does not repair the system but it gives the possibility to overrate the replacments.


The plug fuse is to protect the lead, if there was no fuse then the lead under fault conditions would only be protected by the 32A ring main breaker.
I've had an HP sig gen with a shorted IEC mains filter. If it wasn't for the plug fuse then the lead and the IEC filter could be taking 32A!
 

Offline classical

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Re: EEVblog #697 - Mailbag
« Reply #72 on: January 03, 2015, 05:02:48 pm »
The plug fuse is to protect the lead, if there was no fuse then the lead under fault conditions would only be protected by the 32A ring main breaker.
Ok, the 32 ring concept seems to have its own properties.
Do I understand correctly: The British system protects with 32A up to the plug. Starting with the plug it begins another world which has to protect itself by using the fuse in the plug? This would makes sense to me.
 

Offline Tandy

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Re: EEVblog #697 - Mailbag
« Reply #73 on: January 03, 2015, 07:02:46 pm »
Yes this is how it works.

The 32A protects the entire ring circuit to prevent the house wiring from being overloaded.

This means in theory you could draw 32A from any outlet before tripping the circuit protector. You would therefore need a flex capable of carrying 32A to your equipment. Fitting a 13A fuse (the largest available) in the plug means that the cable must be capable of carrying only 13A. Now I believe in most European countries it is common to use unfused plugs and a 15A radial circuit so all your cables must be capable of carrying 15A up to the point of the internal fuse in a device.

The UK system allows for example a lamp to have a thin and therefore more flexible and less obtrusive 3A rated cable if the plug is fitted with a 3A fuse. This is a good system most of the time however there is one flaw in it, that is the fuses are all the same physical size, so an uniformed consumer could replace the fuse with a higher rating putting the supply cable at risk of causing fire. It just needed one little revision making fuses different shapes/sizes to prevent incorrect fuse fitment to have made it complete.

As a result most products manufactured by safety conscious manufacturers fit a 13A capable cable to all appliances anyway to remove this risk.
« Last Edit: January 03, 2015, 07:06:36 pm by Tandy »
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Offline nitro2k01

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Re: EEVblog #697 - Mailbag
« Reply #74 on: January 04, 2015, 10:10:25 am »
This is a good system most of the time however there is one flaw in it, that is the fuses are all the same physical size, so an uniformed consumer could replace the fuse with a higher rating putting the supply cable at risk of causing fire. It just needed one little revision making fuses different shapes/sizes to prevent incorrect fuse fitment to have made it complete.
Would it be against code to make a plug with a smaller physical fuse size, or is the requirement simply that the plug needs to be fused? (Ie, is the equal fuse size a rule or just a recommendation?)
« Last Edit: January 04, 2015, 10:12:57 am by nitro2k01 »
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