Author Topic: EEVblog #938 - Tesla Solar Roofs - Are They Viable?  (Read 36990 times)

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Online coppice

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Re: EEVblog #938 - Tesla Solar Roofs - Are They Viable?
« Reply #125 on: August 16, 2018, 02:03:45 am »
15th century homes are a bit over the top but there are many older building with ceramic roof tiles which are over a century old. Over here concrete roof tiles came into use since around 1910 and these don't need mass replacement even after 50 years.
A good slate roof can last a lot longer than that.
A good slate roof can last a long time, but most sources of good slate have been exhausted. Much of what is available now starts to delaminate after 20 or 30 years as a roof tile.
 

Online EEVblog

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Re: EEVblog #938 - Tesla Solar Roofs - Are They Viable?
« Reply #126 on: August 16, 2018, 04:57:25 am »
15th century homes are a bit over the top but there are many older building with ceramic roof tiles which are over a century old. Over here concrete roof tiles came into use since around 1910 and these don't need mass replacement even after 50 years.
A good slate roof can last a lot longer than that.
A good slate roof can last a long time, but most sources of good slate have been exhausted. Much of what is available now starts to delaminate after 20 or 30 years as a roof tile.

My terracotta roof tiles have lasted 30 years and are still fantastic. And I'm still able to buy the same original matching tiles now.
If you can buy those Tesla tiles in 30 years time I'll eat my hat.
 

Offline CatalinaWOW

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Re: EEVblog #938 - Tesla Solar Roofs - Are They Viable?
« Reply #127 on: August 16, 2018, 03:46:18 pm »
Terra Cotta tiles are virtually permanent in the southern tier of the US.  In my current location they last less than five years.  A wet climate with regular freeze/thaw cycles turns the to powder rapidly.  In Colorado, where I grew up the drier climate allows them to last until the next hail storm with golf ball or larger size hail.  Mean is about thirty years, but it is just three luck of the draw.  The lifetime of all roofing materials is heavily dependent on the match to local conditions.
 

Offline rrinker

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Re: EEVblog #938 - Tesla Solar Roofs - Are They Viable?
« Reply #128 on: August 16, 2018, 06:27:40 pm »
 Interesting, my Uncle had terracotta tiles on his house in New Jersey, which would definitely subject them to frequent freeze/thaw cycles - North Jersey, not near the ocean or down in South Jersey. No idea how long they were on the house before he bought it in the 70's, but he never had his roof replaces and they sold the house int he late 90's. House was built in the 1920's.
 
 

Offline SeanB

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Re: EEVblog #938 - Tesla Solar Roofs - Are They Viable?
« Reply #129 on: August 16, 2018, 07:10:55 pm »
Yes, depends on the tile and how it is fired, and the clay base used for it. Fire for a long time, and then glaze it, and it will last virtually forever, or till it is hit by large hail. Make it cheap and cut the firing time down and it will be softer, slightly more hail resistant but will turn back to clay with time and rain. However here there is almost universal tile roofs along with having some of the heaviest hail around in the high country, and there you might have a tile every few years to change, at $1 per tile if you are unlucky, and have the discontinued types that are sold as demolition recoveries. Otherwise you have a choice of ceramic, brick, concrete and even composite.

There are also a lot of houses with steel corrugated roofs, and they vary in age from brand new, made from the thinnest steel you can think of ( thinner than a regular spray can for the cheapest ones) to 3 century old ones, made from 1/16inch hot zinc dipped corrugated steel, still in service on listed monuments. Slate is rare, and wooden shingles even more so, as the insurers like them even less than they do thatch, which is common enough, though most of them are getting corrugated outer layers, to reduce insurance rates from stray embers.

Common to have a thatch roof in rural areas, as it is both low cost, as literally you get the entire roof structure locally grown, aside from steel strapping, steel wire for binding and nails, and the number of people who can lay them, and maintain them, is quite large.
 

Offline james_s

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Re: EEVblog #938 - Tesla Solar Roofs - Are They Viable?
« Reply #130 on: August 16, 2018, 07:27:19 pm »
Wow, thatch, that certainly isn't something you see in these parts. Maybe 150 years ago.
 
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Offline SeanB

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Re: EEVblog #938 - Tesla Solar Roofs - Are They Viable?
« Reply #131 on: August 16, 2018, 07:42:53 pm »
Wow, thatch, that certainly isn't something you see in these parts. Maybe 150 years ago.

Pretty good material though, just have to do the modification that Benjamin Franklin discovered, and put in a good lightning earth on it.

but then i still remember watching CNN during Gulf War 1, and them popping to a US segment of a California wildfire, with the usual vista of lots of empty burnt out lots, sporting burnt out cars, piles of bricks that were chimneys, and in the middle of it a single house standing proud and white walled. Cut to the talking head speaking to the owner, an immigrant to the US of A from Korea, and an engineer. They ask him why his house is still there, when all around are mere heaps, and he explained " I though everbody know wood BURN", as his house was built from brick, had a tile roof and protected eaves, so the fire risk to it was minimal. He also had trimmed his yard, to keep flammable brush clear of the house.
 

Online coppice

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Re: EEVblog #938 - Tesla Solar Roofs - Are They Viable?
« Reply #132 on: August 16, 2018, 08:36:55 pm »
Wow, thatch, that certainly isn't something you see in these parts. Maybe 150 years ago.
Thatch is such a big deal in the British countryside that we elevated a Thatcher to run the country in the 80s.
 

Offline james_s

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Re: EEVblog #938 - Tesla Solar Roofs - Are They Viable?
« Reply #133 on: August 16, 2018, 09:21:05 pm »
Wood does certainly have disadvantages, but when you live in an earthquake zone like the west coast of the US, the flexibility of wood structures is an advantage. Brick buildings collapse, wood buildings sway. Also wood is abundant in this region so it's a lot less expensive than building out of brick or concrete.

Everything is a compromise though.
 


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