Author Topic: EEVblog #1289 - Mystery Huawei Teardown  (Read 2164 times)

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Offline EEVblog

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EEVblog #1289 - Mystery Huawei Teardown
« on: March 05, 2020, 02:59:24 am »
Mystery Mailbag Teardown!
Huawei make WHAT?

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Offline Brumby

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Re: EEVblog #1289 - Mystery Huawei Teardown
« Reply #1 on: March 05, 2020, 03:36:41 am »
Those PSU caps ....  Ranghai  (never heard of them myself)

« Last Edit: March 05, 2020, 03:38:29 am by Brumby »
 

Offline johnlsenchak

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Re: EEVblog #1289 - Mystery Huawei Teardown
« Reply #2 on: March 05, 2020, 05:22:58 am »

Congratulation  for  getting over  ten  thousand   subscribers  on that  website.  I so  happen to be one of them  ! 8)

Huawei    has been  banned in the United  States   something   to do with their   equipment  being  a network  monitor  for the   Chinese  government. So here in the good  old  USA ( Not   Aussie )   we don't  see any of their products, no cell  phones or  networking  equipment 

 All those  PC  boards in that unit  are  "Sex on a  Stick"

A good  video  idea is  trying to de-solder  those  high priced  power supplies  off the main  board
John Senchak "Daytona  Beach  Florida "
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Offline blueskull

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Re: EEVblog #1289 - Mystery Huawei Teardown
« Reply #3 on: March 05, 2020, 05:32:57 am »
Those PSU caps ....  Ranghai  (never heard of them myself)

Jianghai, they used to be a Chinese military factory making capacitors, then went private during China's company reform (state owned companies became private or public).
They had joint venture with Hitachi and Elna, and they used their technology to build equivalent models to Rubycon, Nichicon and Chemicon (they all have cross reference to each other).
 

Offline Brumby

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Re: EEVblog #1289 - Mystery Huawei Teardown
« Reply #4 on: March 05, 2020, 06:31:33 am »
My mistake.

Still haven't heard of it before.
 

Offline blueskull

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Re: EEVblog #1289 - Mystery Huawei Teardown
« Reply #5 on: March 05, 2020, 06:43:20 am »
Still haven't heard of it before.

Right, You don't see them much in the wild. They are not really interested in the cheap Chinese junk market and they are not commonly seen in consumer shit.

Considering not many high end industrial stuff in China get sold to the West, this brand is relatively less know abroad.

They do have cheaper, more general purpose product lines, but cheaper brands like ChengXing (Cheng or ChengX logo) or CapXon took that place.
 

Offline G7PSK

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Re: EEVblog #1289 - Mystery Huawei Teardown
« Reply #6 on: March 05, 2020, 09:08:21 am »
I have found the best way of removing units like those power boards providing you dont want the main board they are on is to use a miniature diamond core drill. These are meant for drilling tiles and glass and are available in sizes down to four millimeter. I cut out the via on each leg then you can either easily de solder or if they are tight on the pins sand the remains down to the pins.
 

Offline blueskull

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Re: EEVblog #1289 - Mystery Huawei Teardown
« Reply #7 on: March 05, 2020, 09:20:03 am »
I have found the best way of removing units like those power boards providing you dont want the main board they are on is to use a miniature diamond core drill. These are meant for drilling tiles and glass and are available in sizes down to four millimeter. I cut out the via on each leg then you can either easily de solder or if they are tight on the pins sand the remains down to the pins.

The last thing I want is to drill or grind FR4, especially considering how hard face masks are to come by. I'd rather pan fry the board with vegetable oil than to drill and cut the board.
 

Offline G7PSK

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Re: EEVblog #1289 - Mystery Huawei Teardown
« Reply #8 on: March 05, 2020, 09:42:49 am »
I have found the best way of removing units like those power boards providing you dont want the main board they are on is to use a miniature diamond core drill. These are meant for drilling tiles and glass and are available in sizes down to four millimeter. I cut out the via on each leg then you can either easily de solder or if they are tight on the pins sand the remains down to the pins.

The last thing I want is to drill or grind FR4, especially considering how hard face masks are to come by. I'd rather pan fry the board with vegetable oil than to drill and cut the board.
Absolutely no problem with dust, just like drilling glass or tiles you use a bit of paraffin or dish washing liquid,keeps the dust down and lubricates the cutter making it last longer.
 

Offline blueskull

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Re: EEVblog #1289 - Mystery Huawei Teardown
« Reply #9 on: March 05, 2020, 09:47:05 am »
Absolutely no problem with dust, just like drilling glass or tiles you use a bit of paraffin or dish washing liquid,keeps the dust down and lubricates the cutter making it last longer.

Maybe that's absolutely true, but as I can see every PCB mill manufacturer recommends not to mill FR4, I wonder why.
 

Offline bsdphk

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Re: EEVblog #1289 - Mystery Huawei Teardown
« Reply #10 on: March 05, 2020, 11:54:01 am »
The reason milling FR4 is not recommended is that it dulls the routing bits in no time.
 

Offline G7PSK

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Re: EEVblog #1289 - Mystery Huawei Teardown
« Reply #11 on: March 05, 2020, 11:58:31 am »
The reason milling FR4 is not recommended is that it dulls the routing bits in no time.
Not a problem with diamond cutters.
 

Offline briangordon

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Re: EEVblog #1289 - Mystery Huawei Teardown
« Reply #12 on: March 05, 2020, 12:34:01 pm »

Huawei    has been  banned in the United  States   something   to do with their   equipment  being  a network  monitor  for the   Chinese  government. So here in the good  old  USA ( Not   Aussie )   we don't  see any of their products, no cell  phones or  networking  equipment 

You can get a Huawei phone if you want one, but telecoms can't use their equipment and Google can't license the Play Store or Maps, Gmail, etc to them so it will have weird Chinese knockoff versions of the apps.
 

Offline Monkeh

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Re: EEVblog #1289 - Mystery Huawei Teardown
« Reply #13 on: March 05, 2020, 03:00:39 pm »
The connectors aren't custom - they're standard backplane connectors. https://www.digikey.com/product-detail/en/amphenol-icc-fci/51722-10201200ABLF/609-5060-ND/5802588 on the fan module, for example. Absolutely every day normal part on this sort of equipment.


Huawei    has been  banned in the United  States   something   to do with their   equipment  being  a network  monitor  for the   Chinese  government. So here in the good  old  USA ( Not   Aussie )   we don't  see any of their products, no cell  phones or  networking  equipment 

You can get a Huawei phone if you want one, but telecoms can't use their equipment and Google can't license the Play Store or Maps, Gmail, etc to them so it will have weird Chinese knockoff versions of the apps.

Yes, thank you so much for that.
 

Offline Fryguy

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Re: EEVblog #1289 - Mystery Huawei Teardown
« Reply #14 on: March 05, 2020, 07:51:32 pm »
Hi Dave , i noticed on the board with the 9 big chips that only 8 of them are sitting right next to a pair of memory chips ! The one in the middle has no memory and a different set of peripheral parts underneath it - so this must be something else . There you have your 8 channels and one other chip probably doing some interfacing .  :-/O
« Last Edit: March 05, 2020, 08:01:41 pm by Fryguy »
May the forces of evil get confused on their way to your home !
 

Offline ckambiselis

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Re: EEVblog #1289 - Mystery Huawei Teardown
« Reply #15 on: March 06, 2020, 04:55:55 pm »
About the press fit power connectors, I work in custom made vehicle manufacturing, the bus size type, and the main power distribution boards we currently use, have the same type, first time I saw them I thought the maker was cutting on cost by not soldering them, since the boards are all connectors and huge traces to distribute the signals, but I guess they are normal, haven't heard from the older folks that they have had any vehicle come for repairs because of them, even though all the cabling connections we make must be shakeproof.

Oscar
 

Offline chris_leyson

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Re: EEVblog #1289 - Mystery Huawei Teardown
« Reply #16 on: March 06, 2020, 06:16:41 pm »
Thanks for the teardown Dave, nice to see a very well designed piece of equipment with no expense spared.
 

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Offline gamalot

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Re: EEVblog #1289 - Mystery Huawei Teardown
« Reply #18 on: March 06, 2020, 07:28:04 pm »
Those PSU caps ....  Ranghai  (never heard of them myself)

Jianghai, they used to be a Chinese military factory making capacitors, then went private during China's company reform (state owned companies became private or public).
They had joint venture with Hitachi and Elna, and they used their technology to build equivalent models to Rubycon, Nichicon and Chemicon (they all have cross reference to each other).

You missed an American company.  :)

http://newsroom.kemet.com/news-releases/news-release-details/kemet-announces-chinese-manufacturing-joint-venture
 

Offline thm_w

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Re: EEVblog #1289 - Mystery Huawei Teardown
« Reply #19 on: March 09, 2020, 09:43:55 pm »
About the press fit power connectors, I work in custom made vehicle manufacturing, the bus size type, and the main power distribution boards we currently use, have the same type, first time I saw them I thought the maker was cutting on cost by not soldering them, since the boards are all connectors and huge traces to distribute the signals, but I guess they are normal, haven't heard from the older folks that they have had any vehicle come for repairs because of them, even though all the cabling connections we make must be shakeproof.

Oscar

Think about all the garbage lead-free solder joints we've seen that have cracked, due to thermal cycling or vibration. A properly made press-fit connection is probably far more reliable.

https://www.connectorsupplier.com/press-fit-connectors-in-harsh-automotive-applications/
 


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