Author Topic: EEVblog #997 - How To Solder Surface Mount Components  (Read 13722 times)

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Offline julian1

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Re: EEVblog #997 - How To Solder Surface Mount Components
« Reply #25 on: June 02, 2017, 10:48:13 pm »
Good video. Gets the point across that smt is easy, with even the most basic equipment, once you know the technique/s.
 

Offline alank2

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Re: EEVblog #997 - How To Solder Surface Mount Components
« Reply #26 on: June 02, 2017, 10:52:17 pm »
I always see the flat/blunt/hoof method of soldering SMD, but I do almost all of it one pin at a time if it is 0.8mm or bigger.  Smaller than that it does get a little tougher, but it can still be done.  I use water soluble flux which helps tremendously.
 

Offline Halcyon

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Re: EEVblog #997 - How To Solder Surface Mount Components
« Reply #27 on: June 03, 2017, 01:42:47 am »
Dave, are you doing anything different with the encoding/format on this video? It's the only one I can't view using my regular browser (Opera version 36.0.2130.80). Every other video on your channel loads fine.

I get the error "Your browser does not currently recognise any of the video formats available".

It's the first time I've ever seen this error on any Youtube video.

Disregard -- It's working now. Maybe Youtube was taking longer than usual to encode.
 

Offline Tac Eht Xilef

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Re: EEVblog #997 - How To Solder Surface Mount Components
« Reply #28 on: June 03, 2017, 03:03:38 am »
I always see the flat/blunt/hoof method of soldering SMD, but I do almost all of it one pin at a time if it is 0.8mm or bigger.  Smaller than that it does get a little tougher, but it can still be done.  I use water soluble flux which helps tremendously.

Same for me. Tried drag soldering with several different irons, hoof/well tips, fluxes, solders, etc, but never could get the knack of it. One pin at a time for anything >=0.45mm pitch (under a microscope - my eyes are getting old ;D). I'm only a hobbyist & find soldering relaxing, so also rarely use reflow/paste except for *FN parts.
 

Offline German_EE

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Re: EEVblog #997 - How To Solder Surface Mount Components
« Reply #29 on: June 03, 2017, 07:21:20 am »
I solder the standard passives first, then the semiconductors. Finally I solder the devices that are heat sensitive such as polystyrene capacitors and inductors in plastic formers.

Don't forget to wear your anti-static wrist strap whilst working. http://www.cvel.clemson.edu/Reports/CVEL-14-065.pdf
Should you find yourself in a chronically leaking boat, energy devoted to changing vessels is likely to be more productive than energy devoted to patching leaks.

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Online EEngo

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Re: EEVblog #997 - How To Solder Surface Mount Components
« Reply #30 on: June 03, 2017, 05:25:44 pm »
can someone perhaps help me with a good idea for washing the boards
For me, it was always very difficult to clean the boards from flux residues.

What is the communities' favorite method for cleaning the boards after soldering?

thanks :)
 

Online Monkeh

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Re: EEVblog #997 - How To Solder Surface Mount Components
« Reply #31 on: June 03, 2017, 05:28:06 pm »
I have good success with a rather aggressive suger soap (sodium carbonate + a few extras) and IPA mix in an ultrasonic cleaner. It's cheap, but it can damage stuff (any sort of switch or non-wash-sealed relay is a no-no).
 

Offline mdszy

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Re: EEVblog #997 - How To Solder Surface Mount Components
« Reply #32 on: June 03, 2017, 05:28:45 pm »
can someone perhaps help me with a good idea for washing the boards
For me, it was always very difficult to clean the boards from flux residues.

What is the communities' favorite method for cleaning the boards after soldering?

thanks :)

We use isopropyl alcohol at work and a scrub brush. Works well enough for us.
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Offline piranha32

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Re: EEVblog #997 - How To Solder Surface Mount Components
« Reply #33 on: June 03, 2017, 05:31:10 pm »
can someone perhaps help me with a good idea for washing the boards
For me, it was always very difficult to clean the boards from flux residues.

What is the communities' favorite method for cleaning the boards after soldering?

No idea if this is "communities' favorite", but I wash first well in isopropyl alcohol (brushing with a stiff brush), then rinse with water, remove excess of water, and rinse with alcohol again to remove remaining water. Repeat the cycle if necessary.
 
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Offline jonovid

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Re: EEVblog #997 - How To Solder Surface Mount Components
« Reply #34 on: June 04, 2017, 04:27:17 am »

I see Dave likes orange,  I have tried soldering surface mount components, yes the smaller components must go first.
the big issue I had soldering surface mount is avoiding cooking the board and lifting the mask. if you are re-soldering mishaps.
on a multilayer pcb project.  the need for good 3D magnification.  ;D

here is an idea for hobby electronics kit design.
is to fabricate a proven, reliable design to pcb, then keep some, and sell off the surplus pcb's online.
looks like the key is a good hobby kit design is the component symbols on the board mask and easy-to-get reliable components.
maybe an idea in a hobby kit is to have some of the smaller surface mount components in part pe-assemled.
letting the kit builder add some thru-hole components for the project completion. less soldering mishaps
and allowing for customization. like the type of power supply or the angle orientation of a display.
Hobbyist with a basic knowledge of electronics
 

Online tautech

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Re: EEVblog #997 - How To Solder Surface Mount Components
« Reply #35 on: June 04, 2017, 04:56:12 am »

I see Dave likes orange,  I have tried soldering surface mount components, yes the smaller components must go first.
the big issue I had soldering surface mount is avoiding cooking the board and lifting the mask. if you are re-soldering mishaps on a multilayer pcb project.  the need for good 3D magnification.  ;D
A temp controlled station, quality solder and some practice fixes most of that.  ;)
Magnifying headset will allow you to work down to 0603 and that's plenty small enough for the hobbyist.

Daves copious use of flux was the most interesting thing that turned my head and that'll definitely reduce dwell time on the joint and hence lower the risk of lifted pads.
Avid Rabid Hobbyist
 
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Offline P90

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Re: EEVblog #997 - How To Solder Surface Mount Components
« Reply #36 on: June 04, 2017, 05:07:11 am »

I see Dave likes orange,  I have tried soldering surface mount components, yes the smaller components must go first.
the big issue I had soldering surface mount is avoiding cooking the board and lifting the mask. if you are re-soldering mishaps.
on a multilayer pcb project.  the need for good 3D magnification.  ;D

here is an idea for hobby electronics kit design.
is to fabricate a proven, reliable design to pcb, then keep some, and sell off the surplus pcb's online.
looks like the key is a good hobby kit design is the component symbols on the board mask and easy-to-get reliable components.
maybe an idea in a hobby kit is to have some of the smaller surface mount components in part pe-assemled.
letting the kit builder add some thru-hole components for the project completion. less soldering mishaps
and allowing for customization. like the type of power supply or the angle orientation of a display.

Some of the kits I've purchased off ebay came with SMDs already soldered, leaving everything else to solder.
 
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Offline nctnico

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Re: EEVblog #997 - How To Solder Surface Mount Components
« Reply #37 on: June 04, 2017, 09:18:32 am »
What is the communities' favorite method for cleaning the boards after soldering?
Flux remover. (I think) I'm using Chemtronix 'No Clean plus'.
« Last Edit: June 04, 2017, 09:20:05 am by nctnico »
There are small lies, big lies and then there is what is on the screen of your oscilloscope.
 
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Offline EPTech

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Re: EEVblog #997 - How To Solder Surface Mount Components
« Reply #38 on: June 06, 2017, 09:04:11 am »
can someone perhaps help me with a good idea for washing the boards
For me, it was always very difficult to clean the boards from flux residues.

What is the communities' favorite method for cleaning the boards after soldering?

thanks :)

Hi there,

If it is just a rework or small PCB I use a spray can, like Flux-Of by Chemtronics and nothing further. To clean entire boards, like after manual assembly or highly polluted boards, I use SWAS05L from Electrolube in a recirculating wash table with a brush.
When using aqueous solutions you have to rinse with tap water first to get the bulk of the wash solution of and more important, rinse with de-ionized water thoroughly to get rid of salt ions. The salts will corrode the board afterwards, with delay and for a prolonged time, so you will not notice it immediately. The last step is to blow as much of the moisture of as possible and leave the board to dry in an oven or free air.
You can also clean/rinse with IPA. That required less steps. The key is: get rid of the ions after cleaning.
Not all components are suited for cleaning. The first things that come to mind are relays and piezo buzzers.

Most of this has already been mentioned by my colleagues on this forum. I just wanted to stress the fact that rinsing to get any ions of the board is VERY IMPORTANT!!! There I said it. Hate people who write in all capitals though.  :P

Kind greetings,

Pascal.
 

Offline jklasdf

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Re: EEVblog #997 - How To Solder Surface Mount Components
« Reply #39 on: July 12, 2017, 09:45:55 pm »
Nobody's brought out the pitchforks yet for the lead-free part yet? It's surprising how common lead-free has become because of RoHS (would anyone willingly be using lead-free otherwise?). I vaguely seem to remember Dave going on rants about RoHS before, but I might just be mis-remembering stuff.
 


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