Author Topic: Amazon Kindle Fire Tablet Teardown - EEVblog #219  (Read 2826 times)

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Offline firewalker

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Amazon Kindle Fire Tablet Teardown - EEVblog #219
« on: November 23, 2011, 08:00:52 pm »
It seems like they wanted a removable sd card first?



Become a realist, stay a dreamer.

 

Offline EEVblog

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Re: Amazon Kindle Fire Tablet Teardown - EEVblog #219
« Reply #1 on: November 23, 2011, 09:31:32 pm »
I thought that for a second, but that's not like any SD card socket I've seen.
3G module perhaps?

Dave.
 

Online timelessbeing

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Re: Amazon Kindle Fire Tablet Teardown - EEVblog #219
« Reply #2 on: November 23, 2011, 10:25:22 pm »
Does the metallic tape simply shield what is directly beneath it, or does create a conductive link from the large shield to something else?  If it's the latter, how did you restore it?
 

Offline amspire

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Re: Amazon Kindle Fire Tablet Teardown - EEVblog #219
« Reply #3 on: November 23, 2011, 11:08:33 pm »
I thought that for a second, but that's not like any SD card socket I've seen.
3G module perhaps?

Dave.
I suspect it is for a connector to an EEPROM emulator. I think the development time for the Fire was very tight, and I suspect the hardware had to be in production before the software was finished.

Flashing the eeprom to test the final unit can be slow, and if there are bugs, unreliable, so  it makes sense they test with a flash memory emulator.

Richard
 

Offline codeboy2k

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Re: Amazon Kindle Fire Tablet Teardown - EEVblog #219
« Reply #4 on: November 25, 2011, 04:29:44 am »
I thought that for a second, but that's not like any SD card socket I've seen.
3G module perhaps?

Dave.
I suspect it is for a connector to an EEPROM emulator. I think the development time for the Fire was very tight, and I suspect the hardware had to be in production before the software was finished.

Flashing the eeprom to test the final unit can be slow, and if there are bugs, unreliable, so  it makes sense they test with a flash memory emulator.

Richard

The flash could be a disk-on-chip device (a flash module with an IDE interface)  and the 40 pin connection
is for an external IDE hard drive only used during development, as Richard noted.

 


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