Author Topic: Power supply part 4  (Read 44560 times)

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Offline firewalker

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Re: Power supply part 4
« Reply #50 on: December 22, 2011, 02:01:27 pm »
NICE!!!

Alexander.

I am also hoping for a AVR design. Not because I don't like PICs. Because PIC programming under GNU/Linux...

Either way it would be trivial to "cross platform it".

Alexander.

Well, there's good news for you!  :)

Quote
    After a long beta testing period Microchip finally released MPLAB X V1.0.

    MPLAB X is the new  integrated development system for Microchip microcontrollers. It is built on the Java platform so Mac, Linux, and Windows users are supported. Here are some major features of MPLAB X:

        Based on Java / Netbeans.
        Supported under Windows, Linux and Mac OS X 10.5 and Mac OS X 10.6.
        Newer, more functional GUI.
        MPLAB C32 (for PIC32MX), C30 (for PIC24 and dsPIC), C18 compilers are available.
        HI-TECH C Lite Compiler for PIC18s, and HI-TECH C Lite Compiler for PIC10/12/16 are also available.

Become a realist, stay a dreamer.

 

Offline shebu18

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Re: Power supply part 4
« Reply #51 on: December 22, 2011, 03:03:04 pm »
I still hope for a AVR version too. I also think that if it will be PIC someone with experience will write a code for AVR.
 

Offline McMonster

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Re: Power supply part 4
« Reply #52 on: December 22, 2011, 05:03:26 pm »
Or maybe Dave will surprise us and choose less or next to not known MCU or even small ARM, they're dirt cheap nowdays (and a bit overkill for this application). I'd actually be happy if this was the less known micro, AVRs and PICs are used in all kind of hobby projects and it's a bit boring.

As for the code, a block diagram or pseudocode would be nice.
 

Offline firewalker

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Re: Power supply part 4
« Reply #53 on: December 22, 2011, 05:17:16 pm »
Dave said it will be PID-28 packet. This narrows it down...  :P :P :P :P

Alexander.
Become a realist, stay a dreamer.

 

Offline JimmyM

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Re: Power supply part 4
« Reply #54 on: December 22, 2011, 07:26:19 pm »
Dave said it will be PID-28 packet. This narrows it down...  :P :P :P :P

Alexander.
Ummm. What's a PID-28 Packet?
 

Offline caroper

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Re: Power supply part 4
« Reply #55 on: December 22, 2011, 07:37:26 pm »
Well the new low pin count, dip packaged, PIC32MX, MIPS core chips from Microchip were released into production this month. Lots of peripherals, including 16 bit PWM and 10 bit ADC's that can run at 1Meg samples per second, all clocked at 80Mhz, it has a lot of processing power. It could be ideal for this sort of operation.


Offline JimmyM

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Re: Power supply part 4
« Reply #56 on: December 22, 2011, 07:59:21 pm »
Well the new low pin count, dip packaged, PIC32MX, MIPS core chips from Microchip were released into production this month. Lots of peripherals, including 16 bit PWM and 10 bit ADC's that can run at 1Meg samples per second, all clocked at 80Mhz, it has a lot of processing power. It could be ideal for this sort of operation.
Wow. That sounds cool. I may just have to look that thing up. I have no idea what I'm going to do with 80MHz of processor, but I should be able to come up with SOMETHING!
 

Offline firewalker

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Re: Power supply part 4
« Reply #57 on: December 22, 2011, 09:12:41 pm »
Dave said it will be PID-28 packet. This narrows it down...  :P :P :P :P

Alexander.
Ummm. What's a PID-28 Packet?

Yea, I meant DIP.

Alexander.
Become a realist, stay a dreamer.

 

Offline McMonster

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Re: Power supply part 4
« Reply #58 on: December 22, 2011, 11:03:22 pm »
Well the new low pin count, dip packaged, PIC32MX, MIPS core chips from Microchip were released into production this month. Lots of peripherals, including 16 bit PWM and 10 bit ADC's that can run at 1Meg samples per second, all clocked at 80Mhz, it has a lot of processing power. It could be ideal for this sort of operation.

Sounds interesting. I think I'll give them a try before DIP/SO/TSSOP ARMs become available.
 

Offline EEVblog

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Re: Power supply part 4
« Reply #59 on: December 23, 2011, 02:00:29 am »
Nothing exotic, it's a bog standard AVR Atmega48, with separate 12bit Microchip ADC and DAC.
I considered a 12bit ADC PIC in DIP (basically the only brand micro with DIP 12bit ADC).
I decided to Guild the Lilly over the integrated 10bit solution.

Dave.
 

Offline firewalker

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Re: Power supply part 4
« Reply #60 on: December 23, 2011, 10:42:34 am »
When you mentioned DIP-28 I said to my self "If he chooses AVR, I bet it would be ATmega8".

Alexander.

Nothing exotic, it's a bog standard AVR Atmega48, with separate 12bit Microchip ADC and DAC.
I considered a 12bit ADC PIC in DIP (basically the only brand micro with DIP 12bit ADC).
I decided to Guild the Lilly over the integrated 10bit solution.

Dave.
Become a realist, stay a dreamer.

 

Offline jstkatz

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Re: Power supply part 4
« Reply #61 on: December 25, 2011, 07:39:49 am »
Any plans on making this availible as a kit? I'm guessing there would be demand for it and it seems to have much better performance than other electronics power supplies.
 

Offline EEVblog

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Re: Power supply part 4
« Reply #62 on: December 25, 2011, 11:04:08 am »
Any plans on making this availible as a kit? I'm guessing there would be demand for it and it seems to have much better performance than other electronics power supplies.

Yes, that is the plan, hence the through-hole parts.

Dave.
 

Offline McMonster

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Re: Power supply part 4
« Reply #63 on: December 25, 2011, 11:56:24 am »
Any plans on making this availible as a kit? I'm guessing there would be demand for it and it seems to have much better performance than other electronics power supplies.

Yes, that is the plan, hence the through-hole parts.

Dave.

Will there be an option for soldering multiple regulators on the PCB for more current?
 

Offline JimmyM

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Re: Power supply part 4
« Reply #64 on: December 25, 2011, 12:04:51 pm »

Yes, that is the plan, hence the through-hole parts.

Dave.
Dave, a kit would we awesome. But I do have a request. Would it be possible to make the uC on a plug in board? To allow us to use a different controller. Your board could just use a DIP-40 foot print for the controller. Then nearly any controller could be used. I'm not saying that you should provide the different daughter boards. Just the one for the chip you choose. But we could build a customer one if we choose. That would ROCK.
 

Offline shebu18

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Re: Power supply part 4
« Reply #65 on: December 25, 2011, 12:06:21 pm »
If we will have the schematics we can implement any uC. There is no need for a plug in board.
 

Offline McMonster

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Re: Power supply part 4
« Reply #66 on: December 25, 2011, 12:14:26 pm »

Yes, that is the plan, hence the through-hole parts.

Dave.
Dave, a kit would we awesome. But I do have a request. Would it be possible to make the uC on a plug in board? To allow us to use a different controller. Your board could just use a DIP-40 foot print for the controller. Then nearly any controller could be used. I'm not saying that you should provide the different daughter boards. Just the one for the chip you choose. But we could build a customer one if we choose. That would ROCK.

Different micros have different pinouts, you can't just stick DIP-40 footprint and hope AVR's supply, ADC etc. pins will match those on different controllers. It won't even work on all AVRs with the same pin count. It would require having some kind of connections like goldpins on development boards to be connected using jumper wires and this would be very ugly for such a device. A pluggable daughter board would make more sense, but is it worth it?
 

Offline shebu18

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Re: Power supply part 4
« Reply #67 on: December 25, 2011, 02:07:13 pm »
What he wanted to say is that wanted to change the dip40, on which not all pins are used with another micro that has the same pinout made by the plug in board. It' kind of like the arduino and its shields.
 

Offline JimmyM

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Re: Power supply part 4
« Reply #68 on: December 25, 2011, 10:29:02 pm »
What I was suggesting was that just about any controller could be mounted to a daughter board that has a 40DIP footprint. Like a mega168 TQFP smd chip on a small pcb with 2 row of 20 pins. See what I'm getting at.
 

Offline EEVblog

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Re: Power supply part 4
« Reply #69 on: December 25, 2011, 10:43:39 pm »
Dave, a kit would we awesome. But I do have a request. Would it be possible to make the uC on a plug in board? To allow us to use a different controller. Your board could just use a DIP-40 foot print for the controller. Then nearly any controller could be used. I'm not saying that you should provide the different daughter boards. Just the one for the chip you choose. But we could build a customer one if we choose. That would ROCK.

Sorry, the board is already done, DIP28 AVR.
This is an open source kit, so the idea is that people can build upon the existing code and share etc. If you have everyone using a different processor then it kinda makes a mess of the whole concept. If you really want to use your own processor, then you can lay out your own board, or hack on an adapter board.
IMO it's better to pick a processor and lock it in, than try and provide such a flexibility that few people will actually take advantage of.

Dave.
 

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Re: Power supply part 4
« Reply #70 on: December 25, 2011, 10:54:34 pm »
Designing a daughter board with a DIP-28 connector shouldn't be much harder than DIP-40. The majority of the customers will probably use the MCU firmware as-is, and many of the people that will hack it will probably use the standard AVR, so the daughter board would unnecessarily increase the price for many people.
 

Offline JimmyM

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Re: Power supply part 4
« Reply #71 on: December 26, 2011, 12:07:18 am »
Ok then. Just a thought. Still very much looking forward to the rest of this project.
 

Offline Greg J

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Re: Power supply part 4
« Reply #72 on: December 29, 2011, 01:59:57 am »
Software is software :) The only options with uC there is things like resolution of D/A , unless you still want to carry on with PWM.
It would be nice to have usb or serial port on it tho, and uC that has as many as possible pin driven interrupts. Otherwise you have to write
the pathetic sort of code with while loops and sleeps. The worse kind ever, but it is pretty much a norm in open source/open hardware world. (see arduino modules).

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don't turn it on, take it apart !
 

Offline Nick Gammon

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Re: Power supply part 4
« Reply #73 on: December 31, 2011, 04:20:21 am »
I've been experimenting with doing PWM from an Arduino to the power supply breadboard.

I connected pin D3 (a PWM pin) of the Arduino Uno to the pin 3 of the voltage-sensing op-amp (+) via a 10K resistor, and with a 10 uF capacitor for filtering (between pin 3 of the op-amp and Gnd).

By experimentation, it turned out that multiplying the required voltage by 23 gave the correct output from the power supply.

Code: [Select]
const byte voltagePin = 3;
const float adjust = 23.0;

void setup () { }

void loop ()
  {
  for (float voltage = 0; voltage <= 5.5; voltage += 0.5)
    {
    analogWrite (voltagePin, voltage * adjust);
    delay (3000);
    }   
  }  // end of loop

Judging by my meter, the output is accurate to about 1 percent. Measured readings (volts):

Code: [Select]
0.031
0.492
1.014
1.494
2.017
2.496
3.019
3.499
4.022
4.500
5.021
5.498
 

Offline JimmyM

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Re: Power supply part 4
« Reply #74 on: December 31, 2011, 04:28:17 am »
An Arduino might be good for experimentation. But you wouldn't use one in a finished unit. Would you? I mean why use a $30 Arduino in place of a $2 uC.
 


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