Author Topic: Premium Content  (Read 27471 times)

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Offline Jimmy the Squid

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Re: Premium Content
« Reply #25 on: September 19, 2012, 12:34:39 am »
Speaking as a relative novice, I personally would pay a fee like that for what would be considered more basic tutorial information. But I believe most of you audience is far more sophisticated in their understanding of the electronic arts. It is the EEVBlog after all.
 

Offline robrenz

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Re: Premium Content
« Reply #26 on: September 19, 2012, 01:27:45 am »
Let's say I produced one of these premium videos a month, and maybe a thousand people buy it for say $2, then that's quite a significant regular income stream without a huge time risk/lag and impact on my usual blog video production schedule.

What about only subscribers having access to the premium content?  A subscriber being someone who makes a monthly contribution of $2.00 minumum.








Dave.
[/quote]

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Re: Premium Content
« Reply #27 on: September 19, 2012, 01:42:17 am »
What about only subscribers having access to the premium content?  A subscriber being someone who makes a monthly contribution of $2.00 minumum.

A few problems with that:
1) It forces me to have to produce regular premium content, rather than just "it gets done when it gets done". That could impact time resources to do the regular blog.

2) I think it could lead to an "us and them" mentality between viewers who subscribe and those who don't. Those that don't might think they are missing out, and are being forced into paying to "catch up with the Jones's" so the speak.

3) As someone mentioned, people might start to think that I'm "holding back" on regular blogs to have that regular premium content.

Dave.
 

Offline robrenz

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Re: Premium Content
« Reply #28 on: September 19, 2012, 01:44:19 am »
Ok, bring em on!  I will gladly pay $2.00 a pop.

Offline jaspel

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Re: Premium Content
« Reply #29 on: September 19, 2012, 03:43:55 am »
Dave,
I'd love to see some 2-3hr training style videos.  I am a tech always trying to sit with the EE's and would vastly benefit from them.  $2-6 sounds palatable.
 

Offline Zad

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Re: Premium Content
« Reply #30 on: September 19, 2012, 04:06:01 am »
To echo the comments above; To produce a decent book takes a long time. Consider how many decades it is taking 2 experienced authors just to update The Art of Electronics! Sure, to make a decent video takes a good amount of time and skill, even off-the-cuff ones! But the editing, art work and so on for a few pages can take weeks. Even the far from professional blog items I write from time to time can take 12 hours. When I do "proper" documentation you can double that. That sort of investment in a niche subject like electronics is unlikely to yield a good dividend.

On the matter of people perceiving that you are holding back; Personally, I don't see that as a problem. some of the podcasts I listen to for my other hobbies have a premium subscriber option, whereby you pay a modest fee per month and get the new content a fortnight or so early, plus access to "retired" content. $2 is comfortably in the "hell yeah, why not?" category.

I would love to see someone do a decent version of the MIT lectures. Just to show them how it should be done. The work involved would be huge though!

Offline DrGeoff

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Re: Premium Content
« Reply #31 on: September 19, 2012, 04:30:28 am »
Premium Content is a misnomer. I'd suggest producing items that you can promote through your own channel, since you have a large audience, many of whom would be customers. Product can be manyfold, from books and papers, video, designs, consultancy, projects etc. Of course you will need to do the numbers to see if this is a viable growth option. Whatever happens you can't let the revenue stream stagnate.
Was it really supposed to do that?
 

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Re: Premium Content
« Reply #32 on: September 19, 2012, 06:13:28 am »
Premium Content is a misnomer. I'd suggest producing items that you can promote through your own channel, since you have a large audience, many of whom would be customers. Product can be manyfold, from books and papers, video, designs, consultancy, projects etc.

That's essentially what I had in mind. One-off videos (along with other stuff like projects etc)
Because I'm halfway decent a video stuff these days and have it pretty much down pat. I can produce decent quality content with reasonable efficiency.
I've given up the consultancy gig now.

Dave.
 

Offline DrGeoff

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Re: Premium Content
« Reply #33 on: September 19, 2012, 06:38:29 am »
That's essentially what I had in mind. One-off videos (along with other stuff like projects etc)
Because I'm halfway decent a video stuff these days and have it pretty much down pat. I can produce decent quality content with reasonable efficiency.
I've given up the consultancy gig now.

Dave.
Sounds ideal. You have a video workflow in place that allows you to produce them effectively. You can work out the demographics of your audience to decide which items would be the most popular. I guess if you work on a design you can also make use of it (eg uCurrent etc) in regular blogs as a means of promoting it, and create an in-depth video about it for interested people to buy over the numerous distribution channels.
Was it really supposed to do that?
 

Offline meanpc

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Re: Premium Content
« Reply #34 on: September 19, 2012, 09:46:28 am »
I don't understand how you can say you wouldn't be compensated for the extra material.  Wouldn't you be able to monetize the extra views you would get with additional premium content in the same fashion that you currently monetize your views?  More views = more $$, right?  Or am I missing something?

Yes, but the majority of my income comes from the direct advertising and sponsorship, which is the same regardless of how many views I get or how many videos I produce. That is why I am able to do this full time with only 7,000,000 views and 27,000 youtube subscribers. There are video bloggers with 10 times the audience and views I have that are not able to make it a full time living, because the youtube/adsense revenue is the only income stream they have.
I can't say how much I earn on for the direct videos views, but for example, if a video takes a day to produce, I'd only get paid for maybe an hours work at the view levels I currently have.

Dave.

OK, I didn't realize it was a diminishing returns kind of model.  Unless you were able to have companies directly sponsor individual projects?

I wouldn't have a problem paying, but I think your concern about fragmenting your viewers in a subscription-based model is real.  Whatever you decide to do, I hope you make a killing!

jucole

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Re: Premium Content
« Reply #35 on: September 19, 2012, 11:21:56 am »
What about a PDF  bi-annual EEVBlog magazine?,  any EEVBlog members could contribute articles, and the picked ones get compiled, it would be aimed at all levels, (ie. something for everyone)  You could add sponsor adverts, as well as links to useful stuff.

I'd be more inclined to pay $2 for a good e-zine than a video.
 

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Re: Premium Content
« Reply #36 on: September 19, 2012, 12:58:23 pm »
What about a PDF  bi-annual EEVBlog magazine?,  any EEVBlog members could contribute articles, and the picked ones get compiled, it would be aimed at all levels, (ie. something for everyone)  You could add sponsor adverts, as well as links to useful stuff.

I've had a novel idea in this space for quite some time now, but it would take a lot of work to get off the ground (doesn't everything?).

Dave.
 

Offline KD0CAC John

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Re: Premium Content
« Reply #37 on: September 19, 2012, 01:23:49 pm »
Dave , 1st off you would have to prefect cloning .
I think many would be bummed , if we lost this to that , I would like both and have to get cloned also :)
For me it would depend on the content , as a relatively new HAM RADIO [ about 5-6 yrs ] operator I am starving for sources to learn from a repair / theory / building .
And would gladly pay for some content that would fit my interests , dang that reminds me , to send in another donation .
Hay there we go , enough donations and its all here :)
Thanks again Dave
John
KD0CAC
73   
 

Offline SeanB

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Re: Premium Content
« Reply #38 on: September 19, 2012, 04:02:46 pm »
I will add, as a guy who has to write the odd bit of technical fiction/ manuals and training, as you prefer. A 5 page manual ( that is generally 2 pages of writing and 3 pages of diagrams/picture) can take a week or more to get from the first rough outline to a finished item marked V1, and dome go to a v3 step.
 

Offline Zad

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Re: Premium Content
« Reply #39 on: September 19, 2012, 10:09:07 pm »
A PDF magazine sounds like a lot of admin work. They can look very amateurish unless you get some skilled designers in, which of course cost $$$.Most fanzine kinda things still look like refugees from the 1980 photocopier era.  The Amp Hour is probably the 21st Century equivalent of a magazine now.

One of my other hobbies is model making. This has moved on a long way from the Airfix Spitfire which many of the over-30s from the UK and around the colonies may remember. Modern CAD and casting technologies have meant that individuals and small companies can make custom short runs of specialist models, in a similar way to which Dave makes the uCurrent. The way they are funded is similar to Kickstarter, but without the overheads. Let me give you an example;

Say a model maker of experience and good reputation comes up with an idea and a prototype. He then says "I need money to fund the development of this" and a good number of people show interest. He then invites (say) 100 under-writers to submit $50. Not achieving the 100 doesn't stop it happening, it just means it goes more slowly. Yes, it obligates you to do work, but I'm afraid that is the nature of earning a living. You get money up front (which is always a good motivation for getting the product done!) and you generate a buzz around your product. Not every project warrants something the scale or formality of Kickstarter.

With the uSupply, I think a lot of backers would be happy with a couple of unpopulated early Rev PCBs for their $50. With the understanding that they have no formal support other than other forum users. Once phase 1 is completed, there is the option of phase 2 which might perhaps be $100 and be a populated but un-housed board with simple functional software. This gets boards out there and tested, with software being developed and debugged. It also generates cash flow.

(Figures are of course ball-park)


Offline DrGeoff

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Re: Premium Content
« Reply #40 on: September 19, 2012, 10:25:53 pm »
There's a good reason why magazine publishing companies are going out of business.
I'd advise against joining that bandwagon.
Was it really supposed to do that?
 

Offline ondreji

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Re: Premium Content
« Reply #41 on: September 20, 2012, 12:21:42 am »
So by my having taken this "free information" route, you are saying that I am now forever locked in to having to give away every piece of video content I ever create? And am doomed to having to make a living from other spin-off aspects?

No, you are not locked in -- you can always do what you described bellow:

BTW, I'm not really talking about a "premium content" or "two tier" subscription only channel etc. I'm talking about occasional one-off extra in-depth videos that I would never do otherwise on the blog. I'd be spending extra time and effort on this over and above my usual blog content, something I would not normally do unless there was a financial return in it for me.

I think this might be a good way to go. Several bloggers do the same thing:
- occasional in-depth member only  posts / videos
- early access (or discounts) to books, seminars, and products
 

Online EEVblog

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Re: Premium Content
« Reply #42 on: September 20, 2012, 12:53:45 am »
Say a model maker of experience and good reputation comes up with an idea and a prototype. He then says "I need money to fund the development of this" and a good number of people show interest. He then invites (say) 100 under-writers to submit $50. Not achieving the 100 doesn't stop it happening, it just means it goes more slowly. Yes, it obligates you to do work, but I'm afraid that is the nature of earning a living. You get money up front (which is always a good motivation for getting the product done!) and you generate a buzz around your product. Not every project warrants something the scale or formality of Kickstarter.

With the uSupply, I think a lot of backers would be happy with a couple of unpopulated early Rev PCBs for their $50. With the understanding that they have no formal support other than other forum users. Once phase 1 is completed, there is the option of phase 2 which might perhaps be $100 and be a populated but un-housed board with simple functional software. This gets boards out there and tested, with software being developed and debugged. It also generates cash flow.

Although I plan on giving Pozzible a try for the uSupply, it's certainly not something I need to do, I'm taking the crown funding route for curiosity sake.
I could easily simply put it on my store, advertise it, and take pre-orders. Or even do what I've always done with my kits, simply use my own money up-front and make an affordable (say <$5K) small-ish first run like 100 or so, and then boot-strap from there. I've always been ok with that sort of risk because I've always had an avenue to advertise my kits through a hobby magazine, my website, and various forums etc. It's even less risk now that I have a sizeable established audience
I plan on maybe doing a panels worth first, to know I have everything down pat before putting it up for crowd funding though. I don't like the idea of getting the money and then figuring out how to manufacture the thing. The plan would be, get it right up front, get the crowd fund money, and then push the production button.

Dave.
 

Offline Pat Pending

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Re: Premium Content
« Reply #43 on: September 20, 2012, 09:18:24 pm »
Kickstarter isn't always about hardware, sometimes it's about funding comics, films, podcasts and maybe even the EEVblog, anyway, in the end they make off
with 9% of the cash and it's just a one time lump sum - not good.

As a alternative, PBS (public broadcasting station) supplements funding with donation drives every few months. It might be as simple as
reminding (harassing  >:() folks at the start and end of each video that their weekly fix is predominately at the benevolence of a lone Aussie bloke.

I'm all for Open Source Hardware/Software/Content but still struggle with how always giving stuff away helps puts food on the table
and pays the monthly bills, IMO sometimes it still requires a day job to fund the community projects.
« Last Edit: September 20, 2012, 09:22:24 pm by Pat Pending »
 

Offline dcel

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Re: Premium Content
« Reply #44 on: September 21, 2012, 09:11:10 pm »
Hardware is where it at! I am still waiting for the uSupply. I really want one and want to buy it now in support of you and the EEVBlog. Build it, video it , plug the hell out of it every video. Crowdfunding will work for you, I'll prepay now if nessesary.

Quote
What if I decided to spend 6 months compiling a 20 part in-depth PCB design or some other video tutorial, over and above my regular blog content. I'm expected to just give that away?

Dave.

No! Sell that on DVD! I'd buy that for $20. That is a great idea, but finish the hardware first! 8)

Chris
 

Offline hobbs

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Re: Premium Content
« Reply #45 on: September 21, 2012, 11:49:13 pm »
You don't get rich by publishing a technical book.  The only reason I was able to do mine was that I had a very sympathetic manager at IBM.

There are a lot of technical topics where a well-thought-out tutorial is well worth the time it takes, as well as the money.

John Cleese made a mint doing corporate training videos, because he could make them fun.  (Quite an accomplishment, that!)

You might want to think about that sort of stuff--a lot of the grass-roots folks are fans of yours, so a series of training videos (even on Altium if you can keep from bursting out laughing) might be the ticket.   Engineering managers who have a bunch of folks to bring up to speed on some new thing ought to be willing to pay a fair amount for decent material.

Cheers

Phil Hobbs

 

Offline VonKlitzing

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Re: Premium Content
« Reply #46 on: September 22, 2012, 12:20:46 am »
I'm not against premium content at all but there is an inherent risk, if people pay then they expect far too much. You spoke before on your blog about people expecting certain things from your videos and moaning about the fact that you were not covering the exact topics they had an interest in, introducing a pay model will unfortunately increase this (wrong) sense of entitlement a hundred fold.

Have you thought about trying to herd your "average" youtube viewer here to this site where you get a bigger cut of the advertising revenue? You could put up a teaser video out on your youtube channel but cut some segments so that if they want to view the whole thing they have to come here. I've seen others do it but saying that they were not YT partners and there maybe a clause in your partnership agreement forbidding this (also video hosting might be an issue).

   
 

Online EEVblog

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Re: Premium Content
« Reply #47 on: September 22, 2012, 12:46:35 am »
I'm not against premium content at all but there is an inherent risk, if people pay then they expect far too much. You spoke before on your blog about people expecting certain things from your videos and moaning about the fact that you were not covering the exact topics they had an interest in, introducing a pay model will unfortunately increase this (wrong) sense of entitlement a hundred fold.

That is why I wouldn't do a subscription based model, people would expect too much, and expect it consistently.
I much prefer the one-off type thing.
e.g.
"Here is a one-off video or series on X. Here is a sample so you know what you are getting. I you don't like the whole thing you paid a few bucks for, simply chose not to buy my content again."

Quote
Have you thought about trying to herd your "average" youtube viewer here to this site where you get a bigger cut of the advertising revenue? You could put up a teaser video out on your youtube channel but cut some segments so that if they want to view the whole thing they have to come here. I've seen others do it but saying that they were not YT partners and there maybe a clause in your partnership agreement forbidding this (also video hosting might be an issue).

More views on eevblog.com does not translate directly into more advertising $. The advertisers pay a fixed amount per month.
There is nothing in the Youtube clause that stops me doing that.
I like to keep all my content on Youtube because:
a) It helps consolidate the stats, and makes me, the channel and the "brand" look more impressive in terms of views.
b) Youtube is the worlds 2nd biggest search engine, and the more I upload the better my channel gets ranked. The snowball effect.
c) video hosting is a PITA, and is actually very expensive if you want to do it right. People keep saying "just throw it on amazon S3 or whatever". They just don't understand the bandwidths involved.

There are a few companies that will host subscription and/or pay-per-view video, but I'm simply unsure which model I would chose if I were to go that route.

Dave.
 

Offline ftransform

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Re: Premium Content
« Reply #48 on: September 22, 2012, 05:28:11 am »

« Last Edit: September 22, 2012, 05:30:55 am by ftransform »
 

Offline ondreji

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Re: Premium Content
« Reply #49 on: September 22, 2012, 09:43:20 am »
I can't say how much I earn on for the direct videos views, but for example, if a video takes a day to produce, I'd only get paid for maybe an hours work at the view levels I currently have.

some estimates: http://socialblade.com/youtube/user/EEVblog/
 


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