Author Topic: PROFESSIONAL SOLDERING  (Read 14707 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Ensil123

  • Newbie
  • Banned!
  • Posts: 1
  • Country: 00
  • Country: 00
    • Circuit Board Repair
PROFESSIONAL SOLDERING
« on: June 05, 2015, 01:47:42 pm »



WHY YOU SHOULD LEAVE SOLDERING TO THE PROFESSIONALS

Soldering is a crucial skill in electronics manufacturing and engineering, and a quick Internet search for those who want to learn the skill makes it seem deceptively simple. Learning new skills is a wonderful thing, especially if it relates to your interests or hobbies. However, sometimes things like soldering and electronics repair are best left to professionals.

PCBs (printed circuit boards) and electronic components can be sensitive, delicate, and expensive—and best left in professional hands if you’re inexperienced.

Getting set up to solder is easy. There are so many tutorials and websites out there to walk you through the process, and it’s quite inexpensive to buy all the necessary supplies. It’s obvious why lots of people learn to solder at home! If you have a PCB that needs repairing, you’re a complete newbie to the process, or if you’re just not confident enough in your soldering abilities, here are a few reasons why you should just relax and send your PCB in for repair.

RISK OF BURNS

First and foremost, soldering irons get hot. And we mean HOT. 600 degree Fahrenheit hot. That kind of temperature will severely burn skin, drip hot melted solder on limbs or personal items if the user is careless, and can start fires if the iron improperly set down. Solder may splatter, so eye protection is also needed.

RISK OF FUMES

Solder comes in both leaded and lead-free varieties. Despite the levels of toxicity, many still prefer lead solder due to its strength and workability. Lead-free solder is a less-toxic alternative (and the only option in regions where lead solder is banned), but both solders still produce harmful fumes that may irritate the eyes or cause health problems if inhaled. Ideal soldering set-ups include proper ventilation, which may not be viable for some. There should be between seven to twelve inches of space between your face and your work at all times.

INEXPERT TECHNIQUE

It can take a lot of practice and frustration to get the “feel” for soldering. Too much solder? A solder bridge can form and unintentionally connect two adjacent joints. Too little solder? You might end up with weak electrical continuity from the board to the component. Pulling or yanking the iron away quickly can also ruin the join. It’s frustratingly easy to create a poor connection.

Knowledge of when to “tin” the tip of the iron is key, and failure to do so may cause solder to ball up on itself and/or create a poor, short-lived connection. Improper heat levels and board cleanliness also contribute to poor connections. It is also recommended to use a wet sponge to keep tip clean, but too much moisture can also temporarily reduce iron temperature.

LACK OF COMPONENT KNOWLEDGE

If you’re not well-versed in printed circuit board repair and are unfamiliar with PCB components, you may accidentally damage something while soldering. The temperatures needed to solder can and will weaken the glues within the boards, making them prone to lifting and separating in unsteady hands (the glue returns to normal strength when cooled). The heat can also damage other, more sensitive, components on the board if heat sinks (clips) are not properly used. It’s also best to install and work on the most static-sensitive components last to best avoid damage during reassembly—requiring component knowledge.

Learning a new skill can be overwhelming, especially in a repair capacity where you’re trying to fix something of value to you. If soldering is too much of challenge for you, that’s just fine! Ensil is here as your trusted partner in electronics repair. We have over 30 years of experience, expert staff, a massive OEM database, in-house electronic components inventory, and we offer free, no-obligation estimates.

Check out our http://www.ensil.com/electronic-express-repair

We also offer electronic manufacturing, reverse engineering, research and development, and industrial components repair. Follow the links below to learn more.

http://www.ensil.com/electronic-manufacturing
http://www.ensil.com/reverse-engineering
http://www.ensil.com/electronic-repair
http://www.ensil.com/ac-dc-drives-repair
http://www.ensil.com/servo-motor-repair
http://www.ensil.com/servo-valve-repair
 

Online Simon

  • Global Moderator
  • *****
  • Posts: 13496
  • Country: gb
  • Country: gb
  • Did that just blow up? No? might work after all !!
    • Simon's Electronics
Re: PROFESSIONAL SOLDERING
« Reply #1 on: June 05, 2015, 01:51:08 pm »
User banned but i just have to leave this up for comic value, yea right try telling a bunch of ardent hobbyists and professional engineers that they don't know what they are doing, that is a sure way to sell your services...... :popcorn:
https://www.simonselectronics.co.uk/shop
Varied stock of test instruments and components including EEVblog gear and Wurth Elektronik Books.
Also, if you want to get ripped off: https://www.ebay.co.uk/usr/simons_electronics?_trksid=p2047675.l2559
 

Offline nixfu

  • Supporter
  • ****
  • Posts: 342
  • Country: us
  • Country: us
Re: PROFESSIONAL SOLDERING
« Reply #2 on: June 05, 2015, 01:58:08 pm »
^
|
|
<points and laughs>

 :-DD
 

Online Ian.M

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 7932
Re: PROFESSIONAL SOLDERING
« Reply #3 on: June 05, 2015, 02:16:12 pm »
Even funnier: none of the three boards look like they are even worth the postage to send them off for repair.

The veroboard (top left) has to be about the daggiest scratch built project I've seen this decade.  Heck, the track cuts look like they were done in a hurry with Dave's big knife!

The tin plated FR4 single sided board (bottom left) is all through hole discretes with generous layout clearances.  I could fix that with my granpa's fire heated iron as long as I had some decent flux.

The phenolic board on the right with the green soldermask is highly likely to be from a cheap PC PSU.  Not worth even looking at unless its a special form factor - gash it and drop in a branded replacement.
« Last Edit: June 05, 2015, 02:18:23 pm by Ian.M »
 

Online Simon

  • Global Moderator
  • *****
  • Posts: 13496
  • Country: gb
  • Country: gb
  • Did that just blow up? No? might work after all !!
    • Simon's Electronics
Re: PROFESSIONAL SOLDERING
« Reply #4 on: June 05, 2015, 02:45:16 pm »
I'm guessing the photos were just pulled from google images. The poster seems to know more about making stuff up than actual engineering.
https://www.simonselectronics.co.uk/shop
Varied stock of test instruments and components including EEVblog gear and Wurth Elektronik Books.
Also, if you want to get ripped off: https://www.ebay.co.uk/usr/simons_electronics?_trksid=p2047675.l2559
 

Offline Bob F.

  • Regular Contributor
  • *
  • Posts: 96
  • Country: england
  • Country: england
Re: PROFESSIONAL SOLDERING
« Reply #5 on: June 05, 2015, 03:05:15 pm »
I'm guessing the photos were just pulled from google images. The poster seems to know more about making stuff up than actual engineering.
Absolutely spot on:

http://www.instructables.com/id/Cwik-Clock-v10-An-Arduino-Binary-Clock/         
http://www.aaroncake.net/electronics/solder.htm         
http://www.hifisentralen.no/forumet/mitt-anlegg-og-billedtra-der/21099-mesuts-mess-210.html

(scroll down in all cases)


 :clap:

 

Offline ivan747

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 2013
  • Country: us
  • Country: us
Re: PROFESSIONAL SOLDERING
« Reply #6 on: June 05, 2015, 03:16:04 pm »

RISK OF BURNS

First and foremost, soldering irons get hot. And we mean HOT. 600 degree Fahrenheit hot. That kind of temperature will severely burn skin, drip hot melted solder on limbs or personal items if the user is careless, and can start fires if the iron improperly set down. Solder may splatter, so eye protection is also needed.

Of crap  :-\
Do you guys offer the facility to toast bread? I'm getting very hungry  :( Also my clothes are wrinkled and I got salmonella from the raw chicken I couldn't fry.
 

Offline John Coloccia

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 1199
  • Country: us
  • Country: us
Re: PROFESSIONAL SOLDERING
« Reply #7 on: June 06, 2015, 01:18:28 pm »
Thanks, I needed a good laugh this morning.  :-DD
 

Offline Muttley Snickers

  • Supporter
  • ****
  • Posts: 1966
  • Country: au
  • Country: au
Re: PROFESSIONAL SOLDERING
« Reply #8 on: June 06, 2015, 01:33:36 pm »
My recommendation for 5 posts before creating a new thread by new members would have meant that we might have missed out on this had the rule been implemented, and that would have been a bloody shame.

I hereby formally retract the recommendation as most of us need the laughs.

Muttley
« Last Edit: February 13, 2016, 02:05:09 am by Muttley Snickers »
 

Offline Fungus

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 9869
  • Country: 00
  • Country: 00
Re: PROFESSIONAL SOLDERING
« Reply #9 on: June 06, 2015, 04:36:34 pm »
The veroboard (top left) has to be about the daggiest scratch built project I've seen this decade.

Oh, come on, we've all done stuff like that...  :-DD

(And still do)
 

Online Ian.M

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 7932
Re: PROFESSIONAL SOLDERING
« Reply #10 on: June 06, 2015, 05:05:17 pm »
The veroboard (top left) has to be about the daggiest scratch built project I've seen this decade.

Oh, come on, we've all done stuff like that...  :-DD

(And still do)

I was too cheap to buy the Vero track cutter, so I mounted a new drill bit in a dowel and heatshrinked over all except the tip.  Still got it something like 30 years later, and it still cuts tracks.  If there is space I stagger the cuts so it doesn't weaken the board as much.  I'm normally too lazy to cut veroboard tracks with a knife, but when I have had to do so, I at least used a scalpel and a steel rule.
 

Offline Pillager

  • Supporter
  • ****
  • Posts: 65
  • Country: at
  • Country: at
Re: PROFESSIONAL SOLDERING
« Reply #11 on: June 06, 2015, 05:07:16 pm »
RISK OF BURNS

First and foremost, soldering irons get hot.

I just KNEW I was doing something wrong, soldering unplugged.

Quote
...will severely burn skin, drip hot melted solder on limbs or personal items if the user is careless, and can start fires if the iron improperly set down.

Yes, I always solder naked, lying underneath the board on a pile of my clothes  :-DD

But seriously, unless you burn yourself at least once, you don't learn.

Quote
...and we offer free, no-obligation estimates.

So, he's saying he's not obligated to follow through on his quotes?  :palm:

But thanks for leaving it up, Simon, it was good for a chuckle or two  :-+
Greets

Tom
 

Online Simon

  • Global Moderator
  • *****
  • Posts: 13496
  • Country: gb
  • Country: gb
  • Did that just blow up? No? might work after all !!
    • Simon's Electronics
Re: PROFESSIONAL SOLDERING
« Reply #12 on: June 06, 2015, 05:09:27 pm »

But thanks for leaving it up, Simon, it was good for a chuckle or two  :-+

I just could not pass up on such a bundle of laughs  :-DD
https://www.simonselectronics.co.uk/shop
Varied stock of test instruments and components including EEVblog gear and Wurth Elektronik Books.
Also, if you want to get ripped off: https://www.ebay.co.uk/usr/simons_electronics?_trksid=p2047675.l2559
 

Offline mikeselectricstuff

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 11967
  • Country: gb
  • Country: gb
    • Mike's Electric Stuff
Re: PROFESSIONAL SOLDERING
« Reply #13 on: June 07, 2015, 07:22:28 am »

RISK OF FUMES

Solder comes in both leaded and lead-free varieties. Despite the levels of toxicity, many still prefer lead solder due to its strength and workability. Lead-free solder is a less-toxic alternative (and the only option in regions where lead solder is banned),
There is nowhere that lead solder is 'banned', only the use of it in (most but not all) new products.
Lead-free solder typically contains more aggressive flux, and the fumes are often nastier than leaded.

Youtube channel:Taking wierd stuff apart. Very apart.
Mike's Electric Stuff: High voltage, vintage electronics etc.
Day Job: Mostly LEDs
 

Offline mikeselectricstuff

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 11967
  • Country: gb
  • Country: gb
    • Mike's Electric Stuff
Re: PROFESSIONAL SOLDERING
« Reply #14 on: June 07, 2015, 07:26:48 am »
Quote
WHY YOU SHOULD LEAVE SOLDERING TO THE PROFESSIONALS
Soldering is easy. Anyone can do it. Most people can do it well if taught correctly and using the right tools.
Your attempt to suggest otherwise in order to promote your business is just pathetic.
Quote
and can start fires if the iron improperly set down
I challenge you to start a fire using a soldering iron at a normal temperature and no unusually flammable materials.
« Last Edit: June 07, 2015, 07:28:56 am by mikeselectricstuff »
Youtube channel:Taking wierd stuff apart. Very apart.
Mike's Electric Stuff: High voltage, vintage electronics etc.
Day Job: Mostly LEDs
 

Online Simon

  • Global Moderator
  • *****
  • Posts: 13496
  • Country: gb
  • Country: gb
  • Did that just blow up? No? might work after all !!
    • Simon's Electronics
Re: PROFESSIONAL SOLDERING
« Reply #15 on: June 07, 2015, 07:27:49 am »
Which is what made the post so laughable and inspired me to leave it up for a giggle rather than delete it.
https://www.simonselectronics.co.uk/shop
Varied stock of test instruments and components including EEVblog gear and Wurth Elektronik Books.
Also, if you want to get ripped off: https://www.ebay.co.uk/usr/simons_electronics?_trksid=p2047675.l2559
 

Offline Bob F.

  • Regular Contributor
  • *
  • Posts: 96
  • Country: england
  • Country: england
Re: PROFESSIONAL SOLDERING
« Reply #16 on: June 07, 2015, 12:37:48 pm »
I was thinking of putting an advert on their site: "Why you should leave marketing to the professionals"...
 

Offline wagon

  • Frequent Contributor
  • **
  • Posts: 290
  • Country: au
  • Country: au
Re: PROFESSIONAL SOLDERING
« Reply #17 on: June 07, 2015, 11:56:46 pm »
It looks like he's used legit website links.  Strange.
Hiding from the missus, she doesn't understand.
 

Offline Smokey

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 1575
  • Country: us
  • Country: us
Re: PROFESSIONAL SOLDERING
« Reply #18 on: June 08, 2015, 05:21:50 am »
Um... Can I get a private soldering lesson from this chick?  Beanie guy isn't invited.

 

Online Simon

  • Global Moderator
  • *****
  • Posts: 13496
  • Country: gb
  • Country: gb
  • Did that just blow up? No? might work after all !!
    • Simon's Electronics
Re: PROFESSIONAL SOLDERING
« Reply #19 on: June 08, 2015, 06:11:16 am »
Um... Can I get a private soldering lesson from this chick?  Beanie guy isn't invited.



Sod the soldering  ;)
https://www.simonselectronics.co.uk/shop
Varied stock of test instruments and components including EEVblog gear and Wurth Elektronik Books.
Also, if you want to get ripped off: https://www.ebay.co.uk/usr/simons_electronics?_trksid=p2047675.l2559
 

Offline German_EE

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 2211
  • Country: de
  • Country: de
Re: PROFESSIONAL SOLDERING
« Reply #20 on: June 08, 2015, 08:10:05 pm »
"I challenge you to start a fire using a soldering iron at a normal temperature and no unusually flammable materials."

Mike, I take you up on your challenge. I normally run my soldering station at 300C and at this temperature paper, leather, peat or wood will catch fire:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Autoignition_temperature

http://www.engineeringtoolbox.com/fuels-ignition-temperatures-d_171.html

In addition to this I have a heavy duty 120W iron (temperature unknown) which has set various plastics alight on a number of times, great care needs to be taken when it is in use.


Should you find yourself in a chronically leaking boat, energy devoted to changing vessels is likely to be more productive than energy devoted to patching leaks.

Warren Buffett
 

Online Simon

  • Global Moderator
  • *****
  • Posts: 13496
  • Country: gb
  • Country: gb
  • Did that just blow up? No? might work after all !!
    • Simon's Electronics
Re: PROFESSIONAL SOLDERING
« Reply #21 on: June 08, 2015, 08:23:45 pm »
It looks like he's used legit website links.  Strange.

His email is @ensil.com very odd. Either that's one fake site or I don't know.
https://www.simonselectronics.co.uk/shop
Varied stock of test instruments and components including EEVblog gear and Wurth Elektronik Books.
Also, if you want to get ripped off: https://www.ebay.co.uk/usr/simons_electronics?_trksid=p2047675.l2559
 

Offline mikeselectricstuff

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 11967
  • Country: gb
  • Country: gb
    • Mike's Electric Stuff
Re: PROFESSIONAL SOLDERING
« Reply #22 on: June 08, 2015, 08:58:52 pm »
"I challenge you to start a fire using a soldering iron at a normal temperature and no unusually flammable materials."

Mike, I take you up on your challenge. I normally run my soldering station at 300C and at this temperature paper, leather, peat or wood will catch fire:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Autoignition_temperature

http://www.engineeringtoolbox.com/fuels-ignition-temperatures-d_171.html

In addition to this I have a heavy duty 120W iron (temperature unknown) which has set various plastics alight on a number of times, great care needs to be taken when it is in use.
It may be possible if you try hard enough, but hardly likely to happen by accident unless you're the sort of person that shouldn't be let near any kind of tool
Youtube channel:Taking wierd stuff apart. Very apart.
Mike's Electric Stuff: High voltage, vintage electronics etc.
Day Job: Mostly LEDs
 

Online Ian.M

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 7932
Re: PROFESSIONAL SOLDERING
« Reply #23 on: June 08, 2015, 09:18:56 pm »
Yep. if some klutz drops their soldering iron on a shag pile carpet then drops a cloth or cushion on top of it, a fire is a very likely outcome, but any kid old enough to take a general science class can be taught not to do that nor to pick it up by the hot end!
 

Online CatalinaWOW

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 3154
  • Country: us
  • Country: us
Re: PROFESSIONAL SOLDERING
« Reply #24 on: June 08, 2015, 09:32:19 pm »
You know, what I think makes it funniest is nothing he says is outright wrong.  Just way overemphasized.  I do know people who have never developed the knack for soldering.  We have all seen commercial boards that indicate that whether it is hard or not, it isn't always done right.  When I had a supervisory position in manufacturing for a while, the most common fire drill was some sort of soldering problem.  Even the pros have trouble at times.  While it was always some unusual situation, it wasn't just tight pitches and tiny components.  The whole litany of things - wrong surface finishes, enormous heat capacity, or enormous differences in heat capacity, loss of control of the wave tank chemistry and on and on and on.
 

Online xrunner

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 3974
  • Country: us
  • Country: us
  • hp>Agilent>Keysight>?
Re: PROFESSIONAL SOLDERING
« Reply #25 on: June 08, 2015, 09:32:37 pm »
LOL - I took a little poetic license with that post -

WHY YOU SHOULD LEAVE COOKING TO THE PROFESSIONALS

Cooking is a crucial skill in life, and a quick Internet search for those who want to learn the skill makes it seem deceptively simple. Learning new skills is a wonderful thing, especially if it relates to your interests or hobbies. However, sometimes things like cooking are best left to professionals.

Food ingredients can be sensitive, delicate, and expensive—and best left in professional hands if you’re inexperienced.

Getting set up to cook is easy. There are so many tutorials and websites out there to walk you through the process, and it’s quite inexpensive to buy all the necessary supplies. It’s obvious why lots of people learn to cook at home! If you have a meal that needs cooking, you’re a complete newbie to the process, or if you’re just not confident enough in your cooking abilities, here are a few reasons why you should just relax and call a professional cook.

RISK OF BURNS

First and foremost, cooking stoves get hot. And we mean HOT. 600 degree Fahrenheit hot. That kind of temperature will severely burn skin, drip hot melted food on limbs or personal items if the user is careless, and can start fires. Hot water may splatter, so eye protection is also needed.

RISK OF FUMES

Food comes in both raw and pre-cooked varieties. Despite the levels of toxicity, many still prefer raw food due to its strength and workability. Pre-cooked food is a less-toxic alternative (and the only option in regions where raw food is banned), but both foods still produce harmful fumes that may irritate the eyes or cause health problems if inhaled. Ideal cooking set-ups include proper ventilation, which may not be viable for some. There should be between seven to twelve inches of space between your face and your work at all times.

INEXPERT TECHNIQUE

It can take a lot of practice and frustration to get the “feel” for cooking. Too much food? A food bridge can form and unintentionally connect two adjacent plates. Too little food? You might end up with a weak immune system.

LACK OF COMPONENT KNOWLEDGE

If you’re not well-versed in cooking and are unfamiliar with stove components, you may accidentally damage something while cooking. The temperatures needed to cook food can and will weaken the vitamins within the vegetables, making them prone to lifting and separating in unsteady hands. The heat can also damage other, more sensitive, foods on the stove.

Learning a new skill can be overwhelming, especially in a party capacity where you’re trying to entertain people of value to you. If cooking is too much of challenge for you, that’s just fine! Ensil is here as your trusted partner in cooking. We have over 30 years of experience, expert staff, a massive OEM database, in-house ingredient inventory, and we offer free, no-obligation estimates.

We also offer gardening, reverse engineering, research and development, and industrial cooking. Follow the links below to learn more.
I am a Test Equipment Addict (TEA) - by virtue of this forum signature, I have now faced my addiction
 

Offline ivan747

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 2013
  • Country: us
  • Country: us
Re: PROFESSIONAL SOLDERING
« Reply #26 on: June 09, 2015, 02:21:09 am »
Um... Can I get a private soldering lesson from this chick?  Beanie guy isn't invited.



"Soldering"
You're gonna end up using a different kind of soldering iron, of you know what I mean.
 

Offline DanielS

  • Frequent Contributor
  • **
  • Posts: 798
Re: PROFESSIONAL SOLDERING
« Reply #27 on: June 09, 2015, 03:30:35 pm »
I have seen "professionally soldered" boards that looked worse than these.

I'm not a professional plumber but my copper pipe joints and ABS welds often come out better than professional jobs simply because I do not mind spending a few extra minutes to do a neat-looking job instead of rushing things to cover more jobs per day.
 

Offline hikariuk

  • Supporter
  • ****
  • Posts: 206
  • Country: gb
  • Country: gb
Re: PROFESSIONAL SOLDERING
« Reply #28 on: June 10, 2015, 04:11:33 am »
User banned but i just have to leave this up for comic value, yea right try telling a bunch of ardent hobbyists and professional engineers that they don't know what they are doing, that is a sure way to sell your services...... :popcorn:

You know you've been using Facebook too much when you find yourself wishing there was a like button.
I write software.  I'd far rather be doing something else.
 

Offline GoneTomorrow

  • Regular Contributor
  • *
  • Posts: 105
  • Country: nz
  • Country: nz
Re: PROFESSIONAL SOLDERING
« Reply #29 on: June 12, 2015, 01:43:53 am »
any kid old enough to take a general science class can be taught not to do that nor to pick it up by the hot end!

Been soldering for years, but just the other week I decided I couldn't look away to grab my iron from it's stand because I was holding something critically aligned, and of course Murphy dictated I was to overshoot and grasp the hot end  :palm:
 

Online Simon

  • Global Moderator
  • *****
  • Posts: 13496
  • Country: gb
  • Country: gb
  • Did that just blow up? No? might work after all !!
    • Simon's Electronics
Re: PROFESSIONAL SOLDERING
« Reply #30 on: June 12, 2015, 05:49:07 am »
any kid old enough to take a general science class can be taught not to do that nor to pick it up by the hot end!

Been soldering for years, but just the other week I decided I couldn't look away to grab my iron from it's stand because I was holding something critically aligned, and of course Murphy dictated I was to overshoot and grasp the hot end  :palm:

ok so you MUST use ensil from now on right ?  |O
https://www.simonselectronics.co.uk/shop
Varied stock of test instruments and components including EEVblog gear and Wurth Elektronik Books.
Also, if you want to get ripped off: https://www.ebay.co.uk/usr/simons_electronics?_trksid=p2047675.l2559
 

Offline LordNobady

  • Contributor
  • Posts: 39
Re: PROFESSIONAL SOLDERING
« Reply #31 on: June 12, 2015, 10:52:36 am »
any kid old enough to take a general science class can be taught not to do that nor to pick it up by the hot end!

Been soldering for years, but just the other week I decided I couldn't look away to grab my iron from it's stand because I was holding something critically aligned, and of course Murphy dictated I was to overshoot and grasp the hot end  :palm:

ok so you MUST use ensil from now on right ?  |O

no caution. works better and is cheaper.
 

Online Simon

  • Global Moderator
  • *****
  • Posts: 13496
  • Country: gb
  • Country: gb
  • Did that just blow up? No? might work after all !!
    • Simon's Electronics
Re: PROFESSIONAL SOLDERING
« Reply #32 on: June 12, 2015, 10:59:48 am »
oH YOUR GOING TO UPSET THE PROFFESSIONALS THAT CARE FOR YOUR SAFETY  :-DD
https://www.simonselectronics.co.uk/shop
Varied stock of test instruments and components including EEVblog gear and Wurth Elektronik Books.
Also, if you want to get ripped off: https://www.ebay.co.uk/usr/simons_electronics?_trksid=p2047675.l2559
 

Offline deephaven

  • Frequent Contributor
  • **
  • Posts: 783
  • Country: gb
  • Country: gb
  • Civilization is just one big bootstrap
    • Deephaven Ltd
Re: PROFESSIONAL SOLDERING
« Reply #33 on: June 12, 2015, 11:28:43 am »
oH YOUR GOING TO UPSET THE PROFFESSIONALS THAT CARE FOR YOUR SAFETY  :-DD

Caps Lock
YOUR should be YOU'RE
PROFFESSIONALS should be PROFESSIONALS (you can get the correct spelling from the thread title!)

Sorry, don't ban me - I could resist  >:D
 

Offline ivan747

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 2013
  • Country: us
  • Country: us
Re: PROFESSIONAL SOLDERING
« Reply #34 on: June 12, 2015, 11:38:32 am »
Lol, mods are not assholes in this forum haha!
 

Online Simon

  • Global Moderator
  • *****
  • Posts: 13496
  • Country: gb
  • Country: gb
  • Did that just blow up? No? might work after all !!
    • Simon's Electronics
Re: PROFESSIONAL SOLDERING
« Reply #35 on: June 12, 2015, 06:12:10 pm »
oH YOUR GOING TO UPSET THE PROFFESSIONALS THAT CARE FOR YOUR SAFETY  :-DD

Caps Lock
YOUR should be YOU'RE
PROFFESSIONALS should be PROFESSIONALS (you can get the correct spelling from the thread title!)

Sorry, don't ban me - I could resist  >:D

Sorry was just leaving work and forgot I had caps lock on as I'd been putting text on some technical drawings.
https://www.simonselectronics.co.uk/shop
Varied stock of test instruments and components including EEVblog gear and Wurth Elektronik Books.
Also, if you want to get ripped off: https://www.ebay.co.uk/usr/simons_electronics?_trksid=p2047675.l2559
 


Share me

Digg  Facebook  SlashDot  Delicious  Technorati  Twitter  Google  Yahoo
Smf