Author Topic: X-Carve LIVE Build -> Daves question about an drillpress  (Read 6946 times)

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Offline Barny

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X-Carve LIVE Build -> Daves question about an drillpress
« on: July 30, 2015, 06:29:27 pm »
At the buit-stream Dave Nr.1 asked about an solide drillpress which is available in Australia.

I sugest an BF16 or BF20 from Optimum or an Camelbus.
Smaller versions from Optimum would be useable too.

This drillpresses are able to be used for small mill-jobs too.

These sort of drillpress are available with manny different name.
These china-cracker are not the best, but they will do the job.

If the BF16 / BF20 should be used in tough mill jobs a "suspender belt" should be used.
Here is an example:
(Sorry, its an german page which is automatical translated.)
http://translate.google.com/translate?hl=en&sl=de&u=http://www.juergenschwelm.de/huefthalter.htm
« Last Edit: July 30, 2015, 06:48:06 pm by Barny »
 

Offline indole

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Re: X-Carve LIVE Build -> Daves question about an drillpress
« Reply #1 on: July 30, 2015, 09:27:46 pm »
I just recently purchased a Proxxon TBM 115 and been using it for a bit and I can recommend it.  Not sure on the availability in Australia, but well worth it over the shitty plastic Dremel "drill press" that I had first purchased.  Got it for around 300$CAD.
 

Offline Barny

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Re: X-Carve LIVE Build -> Daves question about an drillpress
« Reply #2 on: July 30, 2015, 10:40:07 pm »
Proxxon is a nice toy.
This Drillpress is a little better then the Dremel.
(A very little better)
But the drill size is extreme limited.

I knew I'm a little picky.
But as an machine fitter my relation to chipping tools is the same like Dave's to multimeter & oscilloscopes.

 

Offline kizzap

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Re: X-Carve LIVE Build -> Daves question about an drillpress
« Reply #3 on: July 31, 2015, 12:27:39 am »
Bunnings should have something fairly decent for cheap, otherwise totaltools, or literally /any/ tool shop.
<MatCat> The thing with aircraft is murphy loves to hang out with them
<Baljem> hey, you're the one who apparently pronounces FPGA 'fuhpugger'
 

Offline EEVblog

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Re: X-Carve LIVE Build -> Daves question about an drillpress
« Reply #4 on: July 31, 2015, 12:56:07 am »
Bunnings should have something fairly decent for cheap, otherwise totaltools, or literally /any/ tool shop.

Well I know I can just go to bunnings and buy the cheapest big arse press they have, I was really after nicher smaller options if anyone has them.
This is an electronics lab in a commercial office environment, not the kind of thing for a big traditional drill press.
 

Offline Barny

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Re: X-Carve LIVE Build -> Daves question about an drillpress
« Reply #5 on: July 31, 2015, 08:02:28 am »
The drill presses I was mention are all desk top versions.
I knew a few people which use a BF16 / BF20 in their office as an universal drillpress / mill for small jobs.
Some of them have a drillpress / mill like this at home too.
(storeroom or cellar)

For example the drill press vor in the pic is a Camelbus.
It runs at 240VAC, is able to drill ut to 16mm diameter and weightabout 80kg.
If you are keen, you are able to mill with end mill up to 10mm diameter.
 

Offline kizzap

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Re: X-Carve LIVE Build -> Daves question about an drillpress
« Reply #6 on: August 01, 2015, 08:26:27 am »
Bunnings should have something fairly decent for cheap, otherwise totaltools, or literally /any/ tool shop.

Well I know I can just go to bunnings and buy the cheapest big arse press they have, I was really after nicher smaller options if anyone has them.
This is an electronics lab in a commercial office environment, not the kind of thing for a big traditional drill press.

I know the environment you are talking about  :palm:

The problem lies in that people don't manufacture drill-presses to be quiet. IMO, get something you can leave and use down at the bunker.
<MatCat> The thing with aircraft is murphy loves to hang out with them
<Baljem> hey, you're the one who apparently pronounces FPGA 'fuhpugger'
 

Offline Barny

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Re: X-Carve LIVE Build -> Daves question about an drillpress
« Reply #7 on: August 01, 2015, 09:45:29 am »
A drill press with belt transmission is extreme silent.
If the drillpress is boltet to a desk with is decoupled with an rubber sourface, the drillpress is almost not to hear.
 

Offline Tothwolf

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Re: X-Carve LIVE Build -> Daves question about an drillpress
« Reply #8 on: August 02, 2015, 03:06:39 am »
@Dave

In an electronics lab, I would actually suggest having two different drill presses.

For general purpose drilling, go with a 5-speed (usually around 600-3000 rpm) belt driven benchtop type drill press with a 1/2" (13mm) chuck. This will allow for drilling in anything from plastic to wood to steel and would also be very useful for step drilling of project enclosures. [Tip: For budget drill presses, check for play in the spindle. Lower the spindle/chuck down with handle and pull/push the spindle/chuck sideways to see if it has any play. If you want round holes, it needs to be tight.]

For pc board drilling with tiny carbide drills, I would recommend picking up a Dremel press and shim it square/tight. PC board drills need around 20,000 rpm minimum and work best at 30,000 or more. Running them at slower speeds dulls them much faster and increases the chance of breakage.

It might also be a good idea to keep a spot in mind for a small belt/disc sander. They come in really handy for final fit and finish of project enclosures and pc board edges. A small shop vac will keep any dust to a minimum.

Drill Press Speed Chart
Jeff Duntemann's Shop Tips


@David

The reason you don't want to tin wires used in terminal blocks is that it decreases the contact area between the wire and clamp inside the terminal block. It causes the wire to remain more round, and tinned wire with a round/curved surface will have less contact area against a flat surface than if the strands flatten out. The best way to terminate stranded wire in those type of terminal blocks is to crimp on wire ferrules. Wire ferrules require the correct crimp tool though (there are a number of different crimp profiles available, too), so wire ferrules aren't going to be something commonly found in hobbyist level equipment. Wire ferrules are extremely common in industrial process and controls equipment though.
 

Offline Barny

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Re: X-Carve LIVE Build -> Daves question about an drillpress
« Reply #9 on: August 02, 2015, 10:05:10 am »
I have seen that Dave habe bought a Aldi-drill press.

I hope these are not that bad like the drill presses form the Austrian Aldi (Hofer).
I had some of these to repair.

Default failure modes:
* Loose spindle sleeve (extreme slackness). The result is crap precision & broken drill bits
* The belt tension mechanismus have an constructional flaw which make it realy difficult to loosen the belt to switch the revolution speed.
* The head of the drillpress is fastened with the tip if an small grub screw.
  This is realy dangerous because the head could get loose during the drill process.
* The fastenig screws of the stand sems to be made of butter. -> use propper 8.8 screws or better.
* The stand is extreme thin. This leeds to unwanted vibrations & bendings.
* The belt housing is closed with an normal screw. -> replace it with an thumb screw to be able to change the revolution speed without tools
* The buit in motor is only allowed to run 6 to 10 minutes in an hour. This is an joke for an tool like this.

The concentric run out isn't that good.

The default changings to make this kind of drillpresses useable are:
* Change the motor mount to make the belt tension mechanismus useable.
* Change the motor fan & apply heat sink to get longer worktime (sometime I change the whole motor)
* Change the stand to an massive round material
* Saw an slot in the drill press head to be able to reduce the slackness of the spindle sleeve. (Sometimes i have to make an aditional brass bearing shell because the slacknes is to bad)
* Mount the drill press head with propper screws
* Balancing the pulleys
* Replace the belt housing screw with an thumb screw to be able to change the revolution speed without tools

@Dave: Have much fun with your drill press.
But keep in mind: This kind of tools are as dangerous as the 5dollar multimeter out of the rummage table.

Remember the old country sayings:
If you buy cheap, you'll end up expensive.
Those who buy cheap, buy twice.
« Last Edit: August 02, 2015, 10:11:25 am by Barny »
 

Offline EEVblog

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Re: X-Carve LIVE Build -> Daves question about an drillpress
« Reply #10 on: August 02, 2015, 10:16:28 am »
I have seen that Dave habe bought a Aldi-drill press.
I hope these are not that bad like the drill presses form the Austrian Aldi (Hofer).

It seems pretty decent, especially for the price. I got two of them, one for the lab one for the bunker.
Yes about the grub screw to hold the head.
The amount of use this thing will get it's crazy to pay 3-4 times the price for a top quality one.
Most times I just want to drill a couple of holes.
 

Offline Barny

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Re: X-Carve LIVE Build -> Daves question about an drillpress
« Reply #11 on: August 02, 2015, 10:22:06 am »
I wish you good luck.
Be careful & dont get hurt.
I want to see your videos in the future too.
 

Offline Tothwolf

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Re: X-Carve LIVE Build -> Daves question about an drillpress
« Reply #12 on: August 02, 2015, 04:26:50 pm »
I wish you good luck.
Be careful & dont get hurt.
I want to see your videos in the future too.

Seconded. My experience with cheap drill presses is that they also create frustration to the point where you try to avoid using them and then eventually have to replace them with something with a reasonable tolerance. "I'm too poor to buy cheap stuff."

Another use for a good drill press is to hold a tapping handle square to the workpiece for tapping holes (turned by hand, not with the drill press turned on).
 

Offline open loop

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Re: X-Carve LIVE Build -> Daves question about an drillpress
« Reply #13 on: August 02, 2015, 10:13:13 pm »
Would be worth contacting the local model engineering fraternity, they would recommend something decent. You can get the proxxon TBM 220 from here: http://www.proxxon.com/au/

 


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