Author Topic: EEVblog #580 - Q&A  (Read 26283 times)

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Offline SeanB

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Re: EEVblog #580 - Q&A
« Reply #50 on: February 17, 2014, 01:36:21 am »
With the ESD damage look up on Google...
https://www.google.com/search?q=esd+damage+photos&safe=off

Two thirds of the way through.......;)
 

Offline SeanB

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Re: EEVblog #580 - Q&A
« Reply #51 on: February 17, 2014, 01:49:42 am »
Again As I go through, simplest way to do PWM is with a unijunction transistor and another transistor as comparator. Going to be hard to get TIS43's though.
 

Offline k2teknik

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Re: EEVblog #580 - Q&A
« Reply #52 on: February 17, 2014, 02:10:27 am »
For graduates, I'll pick the one with extra hobby experience and enthusiasm over the one with better marks and the university medal any day of the week.
Yes you would do so, I would do so, and many other with some sort of knowledge about electronics would do the same, but at the HR department they do not know anything about electronics, they are unable to understand the value of hobby experience and enthusiasm, but the HR department can sort easily and fast between degree/no degree, and marks.
 

Offline Laertes

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Re: EEVblog #580 - Q&A
« Reply #53 on: February 17, 2014, 02:22:48 am »
For graduates, I'll pick the one with extra hobby experience and enthusiasm over the one with better marks and the university medal any day of the week.
Yes you would do so, I would do so, and many other with some sort of knowledge about electronics would do the same, but at the HR department they do not know anything about electronics, they are unable to understand the value of hobby experience and enthusiasm, but the HR department can sort easily and fast between degree/no degree, and marks.
I don't know about that. In many big engineering companies, the HR people will actually have to visit seminars specifically targeted to being able to tell good engineers from bad ones. Now I don't know how much good these do, but it certainly sounds like something where the value of experience will be emphasized even to non-engineering people.
 

Offline hikariuk

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Re: EEVblog #580 - Q&A
« Reply #54 on: February 17, 2014, 02:39:00 am »
I don't know about that. In many big engineering companies, the HR people will actually have to visit seminars specifically targeted to being able to tell good engineers from bad ones. Now I don't know how much good these do, but it certainly sounds like something where the value of experience will be emphasized even to non-engineering people.

I suspect it may vary based on company.  Where I work HR are basically just there to deal with the administrative side of life.  Decisions about who to interview and who to employ fall to the department managers; they basically always involve team members in the process (including the interview process) as far as I know.
I write software.  I'd far rather be doing something else.
 

Offline captainscarlet

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Re: EEVblog #580 - Q&A
« Reply #55 on: February 17, 2014, 03:39:55 am »
I haven't been able to find an answer to this question, but in the 'when I was a boy' vid Dave said that he got into formal EE training at 15 or so, and in the latest ep he got his first job at 17. How did he get into and through college so fast?
 

Offline hikariuk

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Re: EEVblog #580 - Q&A
« Reply #56 on: February 17, 2014, 04:07:09 am »
I haven't been able to find an answer to this question, but in the 'when I was a boy' vid Dave said that he got into formal EE training at 15 or so, and in the latest ep he got his first job at 17. How did he get into and through college so fast?

College in Australia has a meaning closer to what it does in the UK; they're further education establishments specializing in post-secondary education, not universities (which is what I suspected, but I've just double checked).  Two year course, at least in the UK, is quite normal.  The secondary school leaving age in Australia appears to vary by state and is between 15 and 17.  So Dave left secondary school at 15, went to college and did a 2 year EE course, then got a job.
I write software.  I'd far rather be doing something else.
 

Offline nitro2k01

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Re: EEVblog #580 - Q&A
« Reply #57 on: February 17, 2014, 06:25:13 am »
With the ESD damage look up on Google...
https://www.google.com/search?q=esd+damage+photos&safe=off

Two thirds of the way through.......;)
What are we looking for? The picture of a the insides of someone's colon, "endoscopic submucosal dissection" (ESD)?
Whoa! How the hell did Dave know that Bob is my uncle? Amazing!
 

Offline SeanB

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Re: EEVblog #580 - Q&A
« Reply #58 on: February 17, 2014, 06:37:38 am »
Well, it will hurt and has a discharge.........
 

Offline Dave Turner

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Re: EEVblog #580 - Q&A
« Reply #59 on: February 17, 2014, 08:24:30 am »
Reference one of the questions:

In the late 60's fluidics based control systems were available as kits to colleges and universitys. Admittedly the one's I knew about were based on air rather than water but other mediums should work too. The individual logic units were approx 25x12x8  and the connecting 'wires' were plastic tubes approx 6mm dia (from dim memory). The standard logic units nand, nor etc. were available and yes, even power amplification.

The units I saw were controlling 5/6 axis automatic milling machines within a test production line. There was a rumour (unsubstantiated) that the military were trying to develop this for aircraft control systems as they would supposedly be proof against EMP.

Successful as this was I don't think that the logic gates could be miniaturized to the same degree as semiconductors.

Now if the experiments, to create logic gates with light ever work on a microscopic scale, bear fruition we might all be looking at a different scenario.

 

Offline NiHaoMike

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Re: EEVblog #580 - Q&A
« Reply #60 on: February 17, 2014, 09:14:55 am »
You can make a water analogy for a transistor.

Yep, I stand corrected. I've never heard of anyone teaching it like this though.
You can do it for a FET too, constant pressure instead of flow.
Not water*, but there is a "hydraulic linear transistor" of sorts that's very commonly used. It's a thermostatic expansion valve (TXV) and it's found in a large percentage of larger (2 tons and up) HVAC and commercial refrigeration applications. The diaphragm (the side connected to the sensing bulb) is analogous to the gate of a MOSFET and the inlet and outlet analogous to the drain and source. If there's an external equalizer, it's analogous to the substrate connection. The diaphragm senses the difference in pressure between the bulb and equalizer (outlet for internally equalized valves) and when it overcomes a threshold set by an internal spring, the valve starts opening.

*Brittany Benzaia's hybrid A/C uses water, but it doesn't use a TXV. The very low vapor pressure of water makes it impractical to build a TXV for it. Float valves are the control valve of choice in water cycle applications.
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Offline 99tito99

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Re: EEVblog #580 - Q&A
« Reply #61 on: February 17, 2014, 02:04:11 pm »
Hi Dave:  Enjoyed your Q&A vid, it took me three days.

Late in the video you said something that spawned a tee-shirt idea.

« Last Edit: February 17, 2014, 11:18:19 pm by 99tito99 »
 

Offline steverino

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Re: EEVblog #580 - Q&A
« Reply #62 on: February 17, 2014, 02:44:27 pm »
lilshaun, members on this forum that like daves video can select to allow ads on his site, and apart from the rare times that an ad falls back to google ads due to an error they are well chosen and relevant

The ads I get on the EEVBlog site are good; the ones I get on YouTube are hilariously terrible.  I got one for "Clearblue" recently; I'm even sure where to begin with how badly targeted that was.

I wasn't aware that Adblock allows selective domains to be exempt from blocking.  In the spirit of supporting Dave, I unblocked eevblog.com, and if the ads weren't too obnoxious, I'd leave them unblocked.  Here's the very first add on the page:



Wow!  Thanks Dave!! 
Keep the ads coming

(Ok, She's the same age as my eldest daughter...God I'm old)

-Steve
« Last Edit: February 17, 2014, 02:46:50 pm by steverino »
 

Offline nitro2k01

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Re: EEVblog #580 - Q&A
« Reply #63 on: February 17, 2014, 03:34:59 pm »
I wasn't aware that Adblock allows selective domains to be exempt from blocking.  In the spirit of supporting Dave, I unblocked eevblog.com, and if the ads weren't too obnoxious, I'd leave them unblocked.  Here's the very first add on the page:



Wow!  Thanks Dave!! 
Keep the ads coming

(Ok, She's the same age as my eldest daughter...God I'm old)

-Steve
Pretty unrelated, but that reminds of a topic on scene.org, a site for programmers of so called demos. It was a Chinese girl looking for a date. The first reply was "can you code". The second reply was slightly more indecent.

https://web.archive.org/web/20060205135711/http://scene.org/showforum.php?forum=6&topic=76206
Whoa! How the hell did Dave know that Bob is my uncle? Amazing!
 

Offline hikariuk

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Re: EEVblog #580 - Q&A
« Reply #64 on: February 17, 2014, 03:42:36 pm »
lilshaun, members on this forum that like daves video can select to allow ads on his site, and apart from the rare times that an ad falls back to google ads due to an error they are well chosen and relevant

The ads I get on the EEVBlog site are good; the ones I get on YouTube are hilariously terrible.  I got one for "Clearblue" recently; I'm even sure where to begin with how badly targeted that was.

I wasn't aware that Adblock allows selective domains to be exempt from blocking.  In the spirit of supporting Dave, I unblocked eevblog.com, and if the ads weren't too obnoxious, I'd leave them unblocked.  Here's the very first add on the page:



Wow!  Thanks Dave!! 
Keep the ads coming

(Ok, She's the same age as my eldest daughter...God I'm old)

-Steve

I just seem to get adverts for RS, Mouser, TI, and similar on Dave's site.  I feel slightly robbed.  Obviously I need to improve my Google Analytics profile.
I write software.  I'd far rather be doing something else.
 

Offline blackjudas

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Re: EEVblog #580 - Q&A
« Reply #65 on: March 25, 2014, 02:40:29 am »
The EEVBlog site is the only site I have specifically not blocked the ads on.  Seems a shitload more spammy than I remember.

Also, where's part 2?  =)
 


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