Author Topic: [Once Again]Windows vs Linux for My New Workstation  (Read 10853 times)

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Offline blueskull

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[Once Again]Windows vs Linux for My New Workstation
« on: March 19, 2016, 08:50:44 am »
I know this question has been asked for many times regarding to Windows or Linux, whether it is nobler. But if they all fit perfectly, which one will you choose (anyway, the other one will be running in a VM, so they do coexist all the time anyway).

Here's the situation:
I built a $4k Xeon E5 18 core + AMD R9 nano personal super computer for my research on finite element simulation engine for power electronics. I need an OS for the new beast.
I'm going to run a server on this machine that accepts simulation orders from a web interface, probably driven by WebGL, then meshes the user objects, run multiphysics simulation, down sample the render result using a non linear algorithm, compress rendered picture into JPG, then transfer back to the user.
Meanwhile, this will be my workstation at office (I finally got a cubicle, hooray), so the ability to run Altium Designer and CCES is very important, so whether the physical machine runs Windows or the VM runs Windows, there must be a Windows instance.
I will be using OpenCL as I am refining my simulation engine, so that is also important. From Phoronix, R9 Fury series run OpenCL equally well under Windows or Linux, so I have no bias here.
I may also run a NAS and auto backup system as well as a VPN server, but since most VM supports bridged network, the physical machine does not have to be Linux.

My opinion? Well, Linux on bare metal and Windows inside, to prevent stupid Windows update from rebooting my server, as well as avoiding NTFS performance degrading (this is not a problem for typical client hard drives, but for a $1000 1.2TB DC 750 SSD, I think it will stink). Also, I personally prefer the GNU environment for coding compared to IDEs. Finally, gaming is a requirement, but as I am a hard core Source engine fan, most of my games do have a Linux port, so my last reason for using Windows have just gone. For the games won't run, I have a pretty bad-ass (despite not nearly as powerful as this one) home PC for them.

So, long story short, I have requirements that must use both Windows and Linux, and both of them can be in VM or physical machine. Which one you prefer to be installed in physical machine, and which one in VM, and why?
 

Online Kilrah

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Re: [Once Again]Windows vs Linux for My New Workstation
« Reply #1 on: March 19, 2016, 09:48:43 am »
Seems that all that's left as wiggle room is personal preference, and given it's, well... personal, our opinion won't be worth much.

For me it would be Win native because IMO in terms of usability/comfort it runs in circles around any linux distro I've used, linux as a VM if something really needs it / can't be done on Win, but typically most stuff can, with the advantage of only having one platform to maintain.
 

Offline Forser

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Re: [Once Again]Windows vs Linux for My New Workstation
« Reply #2 on: March 19, 2016, 10:06:17 am »
Maybe run the unRaid solution which allows you to have Linux and Windows as seperate machines on one machine.
Same solution that LinusTechTips did for his 7 gamers on one Rig.

unRaid : http://lime-technology.com/
LinusTechTips YT video where he builds the 7 Gamers, 1 Rig solution :
 

Offline Mechanical Menace

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Re: [Once Again]Windows vs Linux for My New Workstation
« Reply #3 on: March 19, 2016, 10:34:43 am »
Seems that all that's left as wiggle room is personal preference, and given it's, well... personal, our opinion won't be worth much.

+1. For me it would be Linux purely because I find it easier and less hassle than Windows, especially for a development box, especially if you need to build something for multiple platforms. Also the pretty much de facto ext series of filesystems seem to be much faster when dealing with lots of small files than NTFS. This can make building projects a lot more painful than it has to be (no matter if using VC++ or GCC via say mingw) and is also imho Windows major failing. Not that every OS doesn't have its major failings.

Also, I personally prefer the GNU environment for coding compared to IDEs.

Off topic and while I share that preference I'd really suggest looking into CMake if you haven't already. If you ever feel the need to use an IDE, build for Windows using Visual Studio or Mac with XCode, or someone who is more comfortable with them has to play with your code it makes doing that much easier amongst other things. I personally love how easy it can make it to include libraries that aren't installed on the system too.
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Offline SeanB

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Re: [Once Again]Windows vs Linux for My New Workstation
« Reply #4 on: March 19, 2016, 10:55:40 am »
How about a Linux ( or other) hypervisor, with it providing resources to a few VM instances that can run any 'nix you want and Windows in something like a native speed. You might need to actually buy the software, but this will do well as a server with multiple VM instances.

http://www.vmware.com/products/vsphere-hypervisor/

 

Offline amspire

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Re: [Once Again]Windows vs Linux for My New Workstation
« Reply #5 on: March 19, 2016, 12:24:30 pm »
It is hard to recommend a move to Linux for someone else, but I have been looking after PCs for many people. I have used MSDos and then Windows since the early 80's for my desktop.

I will be moving to Linux as my main desktop and running Windows 10 (and earlier versions) as virtual machines.

There is a big problem with Windows into the future. The thing people need is an operating system to run applications and that is about it. You have your bunch of applications you use everyday and as long as they run, you are happy.

Microsoft has realised this doesn't make enough money, so they need to make Windows into something else. Windows is not even Microsoft's first or second ranked moneymaker any more. They need to make us dependant on Windows. They want to know much more about me and what I do then they ever did in the past. They want to monitor what I am doing, and so I will have no control over the conversations between my computer and Microsoft.  They want to get me addicted to things like voice recognition that I never knew I needed. They want to get me to subscribe to services instead of using my own resources for free. They will give me a free upgrade to Windows 10, as long as I agree to have Windows upgraded at any time to add any new program, feature or data collecting program that they want us to use. They will at any time discard old system calls and so if I am running an old program, it will be working one day and not the next. They will want me to give them all my data eventually because they start offering a cloud package they think is so convenient and so economical that I couldn't say no. How could I not want to give all my data to total strangers in a different country? They may claim it is secure, but it isn't. Any service that has password recovery is absolutely not secure.

That is the future of Windows.

By going with Linux and running Windows as a virtual PC, I can get a lot in return. I can instantly snapshot my Windows regularly at very little extra disk space cost. I can move Windows from one PC to any other PC without reinstalling Windows or using some special mysterious utility. If a Windows update breaks something, I can revert to a non-broken version of Windows in less then a minute. I can use the incredible new disks systems like BTRFS that give me disk system snapshots that will make me pretty immune to cryptoviruses and that can provide better data integrity. I can use the amazing Docker far better then Windows will ever be able to do. Docker is hard to understand if you haven't used it, but when you see what it can really do, it almost seems unbelievable. I no longer have to gradually clog up my operating system as I accumulate installs.

There are things I will lose - there will be a small number of Windows programs that will never run well in a virtual environment - probably because they have some wacky license authentication scheme that it designed to break if not running on bare metal. All choices have pros and cons, and you have to live with them.

I am undecided which Linux to use. I absolutely love Archlinux-based distros. I am using Archlinux for my NAS box. Always up to date, always with the most recent versions of programs, Linux kernels. But it is really advisable to update very regularly, and every now and then, an update will break something and you have to debug the problem. As an example, a while back, there was a change to Samba/SMB (Windows network file sharing in Linux) that killed certain configurations of file sharing that worked the day before. I did an update and had no file sharing. The cure was to set up my file sharing again using the new official method and it all worked again. The problem is that there is nothing in Archlinux that warns you or helps you - it is up to you to solve the problems.

Ubuntu, and its derivatives like Mint are solid and don't tend to break with updates. The Ubuntu Unity desktop is actually very impressive if you learn it. However, they freeze program versions if you stay on a particular Ubuntu version, so you will end up running out-of-date BTRFS, LibreOffice, OpenVPN, Subversion, Git, etc. In theory, you can upgrade Ubuntu from an old release to a new release, but I have never seen it work properly. Much better to start again with a clean install.

It all comes down to a personal choice.

Richard
 

Online BravoV

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Re: [Once Again]Windows vs Linux for My New Workstation
« Reply #6 on: March 19, 2016, 12:49:22 pm »
Same situation here, used DOS until now at Win 7 x64, will not risk or move to next version, just worry my "convenience" nerves will be spoiled again.

Seriously looking to abandon Windows. More or less same situations like Amspire does when it comes to utilizing VMs for old legacy apps.

Believe you guys are not OS newb, please, should you jumped ship, share your experiences, especially within 3 or 6 months after the migration.

Offline blueskull

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Re: [Once Again]Windows vs Linux for My New Workstation
« Reply #7 on: March 19, 2016, 03:41:27 pm »
Thanks for the replies. Unraid was my first choice, until I realized it won't work -- my mobo does not have integrated graphics, so if I assigne gpu to client os, I will not be able to manage unraid.
 

Online ChunkyPastaSauce

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Re: [Once Again]Windows vs Linux for My New Workstation
« Reply #8 on: March 19, 2016, 03:52:37 pm »
performance degrading (this is not a problem for typical client hard drives, but for a $1000 1.2TB DC 750 SSD, I think it will stink).

Are you solving everything "in-core" and not writing out huge result files?

I looked at the DC750 while for my machine and determined it wasn't going to workout for FEA work and instead dumped the money into RAM. Problem, the write limit of the 750, which is 123 TB.... sounds like a lot but isn't.  Suppose the machine is running an iterative solver where each step writes out 3gb, takes 10 minutes per step, for 12 hours a day.... that's 1080gb a day.... the drive is dead in 3.5 months. Some solvers write out much more than this.... The enterprise nvme ssds are much better, P3700 will give a minimum of 62 PB, so basically doesn't have the problem.... but also more $$$

I instead just put in lot more ram in than I needed, and solve everything in-core and have everything write out to a ram disk, only saving the results I actually need. I found the ram disk necessary as many solvers write out the intermediate results, even with loads of ram.
 

Offline nctnico

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Re: [Once Again]Windows vs Linux for My New Workstation
« Reply #9 on: March 19, 2016, 04:05:38 pm »
I choose to use Linux as the base OS and run Windows from VMs because Windows is much more prone to growing problems over time. Now I basically have a seperate Windows machines for specific tasks and the ability to roll them back to a known good state in case of trouble. All the data is on the Linux machine (and back-upped from there) and I use shares to access the data from the various Windows VMs.

As Amspire noted moving your Windows VM from one PC to another is also a big plus. I'm still using the Windows VMs I created on my old Linux PCs because they already had all the software installed.
« Last Edit: March 19, 2016, 04:08:52 pm by nctnico »
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Offline blueskull

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Re: [Once Again]Windows vs Linux for My New Workstation
« Reply #10 on: March 19, 2016, 04:08:56 pm »
@ChunkyPastaSauce

I only store final results to ssd, usually a transient simulation result of multiple time steps.
 

Online ChunkyPastaSauce

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Re: [Once Again]Windows vs Linux for My New Workstation
« Reply #11 on: March 19, 2016, 04:52:34 pm »
@ChunkyPastaSauce

I only store final results to ssd, usually a transient simulation result of multiple time steps.

Sounds good as long as its keeping the intermediate results for each step in-core. I found my solver doesn't, and writes temporary intermediate results between each step, even if I care only about the final. Granted the solver im using is a POS, but I think when I was using Abaqus I saw it doing it too.
« Last Edit: March 19, 2016, 04:57:07 pm by ChunkyPastaSauce »
 

Offline Mechanical Menace

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Re: [Once Again]Windows vs Linux for My New Workstation
« Reply #12 on: March 19, 2016, 06:00:17 pm »
I use MACs with decent hardware capability. On the lab machine I  have a virtual machine (VmWare Fusion) for Windows and Linux. I can run all three OSs at once if necessary because there are enough resources to share.

Apple branded PCs won't keep up with this monster for these tasks.
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Online ChunkyPastaSauce

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Re: [Once Again]Windows vs Linux for My New Workstation
« Reply #13 on: March 19, 2016, 06:40:39 pm »
I use MACs with decent hardware capability. On the lab machine I  have a virtual machine (VmWare Fusion) for Windows and Linux. I can run all three OSs at once if necessary because there are enough resources to share.

Apple branded PCs won't keep up with this monster for these tasks.

Not even close. A fully maxed out macpro is ~$10,000.  And it's only 12 core with 64gb ram (max limit) and not so great gpu compute performance. Basically $2,500-3000 worth of PC hardware.
 

Offline nctnico

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Re: [Once Again]Windows vs Linux for My New Workstation
« Reply #14 on: March 19, 2016, 07:34:12 pm »
I use MACs with decent hardware capability. On the lab machine I  have a virtual machine (VmWare Fusion) for Windows and Linux. I can run all three OSs at once if necessary because there are enough resources to share.

Apple branded PCs won't keep up with this monster for these tasks.
Not even close. A fully maxed out macpro is ~$10,000.  And it's only 12 core with 64gb ram (max limit) and not so great gpu compute performance. Basically $2,500-3000 worth of PC hardware.
PC hardware of similar quality will likely cost a bit more but IMHO it is worth spending some extra money on quality hardware. Which makes me wonder if MACs use error correction (ECC) memory or not. In my 'new' PC I specifically choose to have ECC memory to improve stability and reliability.
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Online ChunkyPastaSauce

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Re: [Once Again]Windows vs Linux for My New Workstation
« Reply #15 on: March 19, 2016, 07:45:46 pm »
I use MACs with decent hardware capability. On the lab machine I  have a virtual machine (VmWare Fusion) for Windows and Linux. I can run all three OSs at once if necessary because there are enough resources to share.

Apple branded PCs won't keep up with this monster for these tasks.
Not even close. A fully maxed out macpro is ~$10,000.  And it's only 12 core with 64gb ram (max limit) and not so great gpu compute performance. Basically $2,500-3000 worth of PC hardware.
PC hardware of similar quality will likely cost a bit more but IMHO it is worth spending some extra money on quality hardware. Which makes me wonder if MACs use error correction (ECC) memory or not. In my 'new' PC I specifically choose to have ECC memory to improve stability and reliability.

Im basing the pricing based on my computer built a year ago.  Xeon E5 3.5ghz 6 core, 64gb DDR4 ECC RAM, High end pro gfx (also ECC gfx mem), workstation class motherboard, high quality psu, SSD. Monster heat-sink so it's close to silent. That was $2000 a year ago. Upping to 12 core probably puts it around $3,000 today and basically equivalent to the $10,000 macpro.

Apple took a weird direction. There older macpros, with the aluminum cases were awesome. Whole thing oozed quality, and fully expandable. The new macpros, they aimed at making is as compact as possible while sacrificing price and expandability.... which is bizarre as most people looking for something high end, size is usually near the bottom of the list and expandability is usually pretty high.
« Last Edit: March 19, 2016, 07:54:51 pm by ChunkyPastaSauce »
 

Offline blueskull

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Re: [Once Again]Windows vs Linux for My New Workstation
« Reply #16 on: March 19, 2016, 08:05:36 pm »
PC hardware of similar quality will likely cost a bit more but IMHO it is worth spending some extra money on quality hardware.

My mobo chosen is not cheap -- dirt cheap X99 can be obtain for $180, mine costed me $240. Of course, there are up to $600 ones out there, but they are full featured, which I do not use most of the fancy features. For a bare minimum X99 selling for $240 is definitely not cheap. Besides the audiophoolery Nichicon GTII caps in audio path, the entire board uses only 12k hours rated lifetime solid Nichicon capacitors and 60A*3 VRM.

Mac GPUs and PC GPUs are made of the same PCB and die, just different BIOS. There are eBay services that can crack PC GPUs to their MAC versions.

PSU, where a PC is most likely to die on, in my case, is a top notch Seasonic 520W 80 Plus Platinum one (my system consumes 175W+145W+misc, about 450W max even when both CPU and GPU are in turbo boost). This thing costs $130, which is absolutely insane. Normal good brand good quality PSUs at that power level sells for $90 or less.

I have 2 channels of Samsung 2133MHz RLDIMM ECC memory stick installed in this build, so stability is not an issue anymore. Yes, non ECC memories did bugger be, but after moving to ECC memory more than 1 year ago, my world became much better -- no random shits, no BSODs, not weird pixel corruptions.

There are no mechanical parts in my system that is prone to fail -- no HDD, all fans are Noctua top of the line fans, water pump is a bit cheap, but it does have built in monitoring, so I can replace it way before it catastrophically fails.

All in the box storage is in a DC750 SSD, and all backups are transferred to my home server via internet, to Google Drive and Gmail as well as my home server. Despite not an ECC powered one (just an i5 NUC), it is extremely stable, I run it 24*7, and I only reboot it either on a power failure, or a major Kernel upgrade (that's why I'm eager to move to 4.2 or 4.4 kernel).
 

Offline elgonzo

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Re: [Once Again]Windows vs Linux for My New Workstation
« Reply #17 on: March 19, 2016, 08:08:00 pm »
Im basing the pricing based on my computer built a year ago.  Xeon E5 3.5ghz 6 core, 64gb DDR4 EEC RAM, High end pro gfx with EEC, workstation class motherboard, high quality psu, SSD. Monster heat-sink so it's close to silent. That was $2000 a year ago. Upping to 12 core probably puts it around $3,000 today and basically equivalent to the $10,000 macpro.
Huh??? You would pay almost $2000 or more for a high-end pro GPU alone...
 

Offline blueskull

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Re: [Once Again]Windows vs Linux for My New Workstation
« Reply #18 on: March 19, 2016, 08:08:51 pm »
High end pro gfx (also ECC gfx mem).

The rest of the system is at least $1k, so how you managed to get a $1k GPU with ECC VRAM? If there is one with ECC VRAM, and it supports OpenCL at a reasonable price, I definitely want one.
 

Online ChunkyPastaSauce

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Re: [Once Again]Windows vs Linux for My New Workstation
« Reply #19 on: March 19, 2016, 08:21:21 pm »
High end pro gfx (also ECC gfx mem).

The rest of the system is at least $1k, so how you managed to get a $1k GPU with ECC VRAM? If there is one with ECC VRAM, and it supports OpenCL at a reasonable price, I definitely want one.

W8100 FirePro. It is OpenCL native and has 8GB of ECC memory. $1000 gfx card. If you go here http://www.fireprographics.com/experience/us/index.asp, you can pick one up for $500 but you are limited to 1.  W8100 is second to the FirePro W9100, which is AMDs top pro gpu (you can pick that up for $1,500 using the link and has 16gb ECC onboard).

Downside, the FirePro drivers still have issues with Windows 10.  Also Ive had the card for a year now, so it is at-least a year old card.
« Last Edit: March 20, 2016, 04:22:10 am by ChunkyPastaSauce »
 

Offline blueskull

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Re: [Once Again]Windows vs Linux for My New Workstation
« Reply #20 on: March 19, 2016, 08:35:59 pm »
W8100 FirePro. It is OpenCL native and has 8GB of ECC memory. $1000 gfx card. If you go here http://www.fireprographics.com/experience/us/index.asp, you can pick one up for $500 but you are limited to 1.  W8100 is second to the FirePro W9100, which is AMDs top pro gpu (you can pick that up for $1,500 using the link and has 16gb ECC onboard).

Downside, the FirePro drivers still have issues with Windows 10.  Also Ive had the card for a year now, so it is at-least a year old card.

There WAS a promo.
 

Offline elgonzo

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Re: [Once Again]Windows vs Linux for My New Workstation
« Reply #21 on: March 19, 2016, 08:36:30 pm »
W8100 FirePro. It is OpenCL native and has 8GB of ECC memory. $1000 gfx card. If you go here http://www.fireprographics.com/experience/us/index.asp, you can pick one up for $500 but you are limited to 1.  W8100 is second to the FirePro W9100, which is AMDs top pro gpu (you can pick that up for $1,500 using the link and has 16gb ECC onboard).

Downside, the FirePro cards still has issues with Windows 10.  Also Ive had the card for a year now, so it is at-least a year old card.
Oha. The W8100 is down to ca. $1300 MSRP. That's quite competitive pricing.
(With AMD's cashback promotion - which unfortunately ended in January -- the price would be even cheaper. Still, with a guessed street price of $1000...$1100 the W8100 is really a steal...)
 

Online ChunkyPastaSauce

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Re: [Once Again]Windows vs Linux for My New Workstation
« Reply #22 on: March 19, 2016, 08:37:02 pm »
If you go here http://www.fireprographics.com/experience/us/index.asp, you can pick one up for $500 but you are limited to 1.  W8100 is second to the FirePro W9100, which is AMDs top pro gpu (you can pick that up for $1,500 using the link and has 16gb ECC onboard).

Nm on promo, was open for like over a year or something but looks like they ended it recently. The W8100 is still $1k from most places
 

Online ChunkyPastaSauce

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Re: [Once Again]Windows vs Linux for My New Workstation
« Reply #23 on: March 19, 2016, 08:39:32 pm »
W8100 FirePro. It is OpenCL native and has 8GB of ECC memory. $1000 gfx card. If you go here http://www.fireprographics.com/experience/us/index.asp, you can pick one up for $500 but you are limited to 1.  W8100 is second to the FirePro W9100, which is AMDs top pro gpu (you can pick that up for $1,500 using the link and has 16gb ECC onboard).

Downside, the FirePro cards still has issues with Windows 10.  Also Ive had the card for a year now, so it is at-least a year old card.
Oha. The W8100 is down to ca. $1300 MSRP. That's quite competitive pricing.
(With AMD's cashback promotion - which unfortunately ended in January -- the price would be even cheaper. Still, with a guessed street price of $1000...$1100 the W8100 is really a steal...)

Yeah sorry about the promo :P

But it is still competitive pricing... and it can drive 4 4k monitors, or 6 2k monitors. Used it with 3 2k monitors, no problem.
« Last Edit: March 19, 2016, 08:45:12 pm by ChunkyPastaSauce »
 

Offline BFX

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Re: [Once Again]Windows vs Linux for My New Workstation
« Reply #24 on: March 21, 2016, 12:54:33 am »
My new workstation is 1week old.
I7, 3GHz, 32GB RAM, and ASUS STRIX graphics card. (No I'm not gamer I ran last time some game in 1990 on Amiga 600)
Runs on W10 why? Because of lot of sw what I need to use  C#(Visual studio), lots of SQL servers, lots of internet servers, lots of MCU/FPGA dev platforms, lots of vector graphics sw, and I don't know now what else next.
Also some special HW like NI DAQ, IO and GPIB cards, logic analyzer, microscope, oscilloscope.
I really don't know if exist some alternative but I don't care.
And also in this case was my priority had in idle as much as possible low power consumption. (It's also depends on system power management)
Installing of this sw is about 1 week and I think it's no possible to install something similar on Linux.
Or maybe yes during one year :D

What else?
I had the android phone (Lenovo) ... never again.
Now Microsoft Nokia 550 cheap but working well:)

Notebook also W10.

All is synchronised all is working no problem whatsoever.
 
By the way I'm using also Linux but for web servers. And for the R-Pi, Beaglebone and CNC miller.
 

Online Marco

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Re: [Once Again]Windows vs Linux for My New Workstation
« Reply #25 on: March 21, 2016, 02:11:49 am »
So, long story short, I have requirements that must use both Windows and Linux, and both of them can be in VM or physical machine. Which one you prefer to be installed in physical machine, and which one in VM, and why?

Using Linux as the host allows you to do this :



PS. you can do it with Xen too of course, which is I think is what unraid does.
« Last Edit: March 21, 2016, 02:20:49 am by Marco »
 

Online ChunkyPastaSauce

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Re: [Once Again]Windows vs Linux for My New Workstation
« Reply #26 on: March 21, 2016, 02:40:18 am »
That looks pretty awesome. I do the reverse and run the vm in windows. Hyper-V in windows 10 is very easy to setup butI haven't tried gaming and I doubt it runs anywhere as fast as that.
 

Offline blueskull

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Re: [Once Again]Windows vs Linux for My New Workstation
« Reply #27 on: March 21, 2016, 02:41:34 am »
PS. you can do it with Xen too of course, which is I think is what unraid does.

My VM of choice is always VBox for a couple of reasons:
1. I do not need the KVM or XEN performance,
2. I do need USB2.0/3.0,
3. I need 3D capability for Altium,
4. I do not need crazy 3D performance provided by VMware, I run games on Linux natively (kudos to Valve),
5. I can not use PCIe GPU passthrough as my mobo does not have an iGPU,
6. I like its custom network driver, it is powerful enough to compete KVM/XEN, and it does not use Linux TUN/TAP system so I can have an isolated network infrastructure,
7. I do not like to write config files, nor do I like to use 3rd party config tools.
 

Offline amspire

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Re: [Once Again]Windows vs Linux for My New Workstation
« Reply #28 on: March 21, 2016, 02:54:35 am »
Marco, thanks for that video. I gather that it is configured to use the GPU card for the KVM Windows session and the inbuilt Intel graphics for the Linux (Archlinix ?). Interesting.

I like Qemu/KVM but I admit was was thinking of Virtualbox for ease of use. But the Qemu/KVM starts very easily from a command line, and so it is dead easy to organise for it to start just after Linux boot automatically, or from a screen icon. I trust it much more then Virtualbox.

I have been running Proxmox on an old machine for 5 years now to run KVM and OpenVZ virtual servers and KVM does impress me a lot. Proxmox is just the simplest way to set up and run a bare metal VM server. One of my virtual servers is a Windows XP virtual PC stripped down to run in 400MBytes of RAM just so I can run some old licence servers. The rest are Ubuntu and Archlinux. My main servers are an Archlinix BTRFS NAS accessing mirrored 3G data drives, A Redmine project management and SVN server on Ubuntu, a Seafile server on Ubuntu (like Dropbox but it is actually able to be genuinely secure) and the Windows XP. These 4 virtual PC's all run happily together on a slow low power dual core athlon-based Proxmox server with 4G ram.

Richard
 

Online Marco

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Re: [Once Again]Windows vs Linux for My New Workstation
« Reply #29 on: March 21, 2016, 03:53:50 am »
5. I can not use PCIe GPU passthrough as my mobo does not have an iGPU

An extra PCIe GPU is nothing compared to the hardware you already have. Hell don't you have one? (If you need a PCIE x1 card just dremel down something old.)
 

Offline blueskull

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Re: [Once Again]Windows vs Linux for My New Workstation
« Reply #30 on: March 21, 2016, 03:58:55 am »
5. I can not use PCIe GPU passthrough as my mobo does not have an iGPU

An extra PCIe GPU is nothing compared to the hardware you already have. Hell don't you have one? (If you need a PCIE x1 card just dremel down something old.)

It is a small on-the-top-of-my-desk office computer in an ITX shoebox. There is no slots for a second GPU.
Our office has university managed PCs with lower speed, and I am not allowed to remove them, so I need an extra one.
I packed 18 CPU cores and a full Fiji HBM GPU into a 20*26*28 package -- of course, watercooled.
 

Online Marco

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Re: [Once Again]Windows vs Linux for My New Workstation
« Reply #31 on: March 21, 2016, 04:13:03 am »
Marco, thanks for that video. I gather that it is configured to use the GPU card for the KVM Windows session and the inbuilt Intel graphics for the Linux (Archlinix ?). Interesting.

AFAICS he actually does a function level reset and uses it in Linux again when he's done, so he has the high power GPU available in both OS's (obviously not at the same time).
 

Offline amspire

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Re: [Once Again]Windows vs Linux for My New Workstation
« Reply #32 on: March 21, 2016, 04:25:05 am »
Marco, thanks for that video. I gather that it is configured to use the GPU card for the KVM Windows session and the inbuilt Intel graphics for the Linux (Archlinix ?). Interesting.

AFAICS he actually does a function level reset and uses it in Linux again when he's done, so he has the high power GPU available in both OS's (obviously not at the same time).

Brilliant! I will have to follow this up. I have been using the 3G animation program Blender on Windows and I would love to move to Linux. Near full speed GPU access on both is exactly what I need.
 


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