Author Topic: [rant]why do english/chinese companies don't give a damn about other languages..  (Read 12069 times)

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Online nctnico

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Germany? When did that change? When I was going to school there back in the 80s, English was a required subject.
There is a difference between learning how a language sounds and being able to have a meaningfull conversation. I had French in school for 2 years and it is barely enough for me to order something in a restaurant. Relying on English in Germany, France, Italy, Spain, etc is definitely not a good idea. The main problem is that they dub the voices in English movies and TV series in many big countries so the people never really get to learn how the English language is used (and they seem to give actors like Silvester Stallone and 'Arnie' these weird girly voices :palm: ).
There are small lies, big lies and then there is what is on the screen of your oscilloscope.
 

Online nctnico

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Seriously though, both English and French have a lot of bugs in their language, mainly with ambiguities and inconsistencies. But having masculine and feminine for nouns is simply bad design. There is no logical reason to make a language more complicated by having gender for nouns.
You never tried to learn Dutch then!
There are small lies, big lies and then there is what is on the screen of your oscilloscope.
 

Offline JPortici

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(and they seem to give actors like Silvester Stallone and 'Arnie' these weird girly voices :palm: ).

many of the great dubbers are.. dead. Newer guys have weak voices and no expression at all.
And times have-a changed too, 15 to 5 years ago the bigger the budget the better the dubbing (before there was an overall good quality). last five years have been a nightmare, especially in TV shows. a new episode every week, all must come out the same day and there can't be spoilers. Dubbers have to work with the only script and a black screen where you only see the mouths, so they have no idea of the situation

one of the younger great voice actor hosts a radio show every sunday where he invites other voice actors to talk about their careers, make readings, phone calls and such. An orgasm for your ears :)
 

Online vodka

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Germany? When did that change? When I was going to school there back in the 80s, English was a required subject.
There is a difference between learning how a language sounds and being able to have a meaningfull conversation. I had French in school for 2 years and it is barely enough for me to order something in a restaurant. Relying on English in Germany, France, Italy, Spain, etc is definitely not a good idea. The main problem is that they dub the voices in English movies and TV series in many big countries so the people never really get to learn how the English language is used (and they seem to give actors like Silvester Stallone and 'Arnie' these weird girly voices :palm: ).

Are you sure that Stallone and Schwarzenegger have a girl voice on spanish dub?

https://youtu.be/_YWzcWYvjGw

https://youtu.be/f-M3vvzQtnY

Let's that tomboys
 

Offline Macbeth

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I hate dubbed movies. The mouth synching is absurd. I would much rather read the subtitles, indeed I find it much quicker to get into the movie with subtitles. There is also the opportunity to use subbed movies to help learn a foreign language. I am sure this works vice versa with English movies.

But I do have exceptions, like the classic Sergio Leone "Spaghetti Westerns". The dubbing is all part of the charm then.
 

Offline Brumby

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Generating documentation in the first place is an uphill battle when management just want the application up and running.  Generating good documentation is even more difficult still.  You have people who are creating it come from a technical environment and the people using it don't.  The subsequent 'vocational culture' gap requires journalistic writing skills - not technical ones, but it is extremely rare to find someone who not only understands the technical details, but can write clearly enough for the target audience at a speed (read 'cost') that management will tolerate.

But the real pickle, which AntiProtonBoy mentioned, is change management.
Anyone who has worked in a commercial software development environment will know the challenges here and most will cringe.  The mechanical changes to things like executables, parameters, databases, etc. are enough to keep you on your toes, but documentation...?

Keeping it current is nearly impossible as they don't want to give you any time to do it.  Added to this is the all-too-frequent urgent fix that needs to be done the day before yesterday - and once it has been done, then you are thrown back onto your current project with no opportunity to do anything about documentation other than to tell management that it needs to be updated ... which they quietly ignore.

And this is for only ONE language!
 
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Offline Brumby

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Seriously though, both English and French have a lot of bugs in their language, mainly with ambiguities and inconsistencies. But having masculine and feminine for nouns is simply bad design. There is no logical reason to make a language more complicated by having gender for nouns.

Here's my fave on the subject of 'making a language more complicated'....

How many different ways can you pronounce "ough" in the English language?
 

Offline blueskull

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How many different ways can you pronounce "ough" in the English language?

Average Japanese kanjis have more than or equal to 3 pronunciations, while some have more than 5.
Average Chinese characters have 1 or 2 pronunciations, while in some rare cases, up to 6.
AFAIK, "ough" can be pronounced "au", "ou", "af", "of". Additions are welcomed.
 

Offline Brumby

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I've done the exercise for "ough" - and there are more.....


Trivia:  I was first inspired to check this out when an episode of  'The Flying Nun' had an English lesson where one of the characters was reading out an English text...
 


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