Author Topic: 100% sealed dispensing bottle  (Read 1405 times)

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Offline gaminnTopic starter

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100% sealed dispensing bottle
« on: May 21, 2024, 06:36:57 pm »
Hi,
I'm looking for a dispensing bottle for highly volatile liquid like the one in the picture. Ideally transparent one, compatible with standard dispensing needles, squeezable, 20 - 50 ml volume.

I tried many bottles, mainly from AliExpress. The cheapest ones are useless, they spill the liquid itself when dispensing. The more expensive ones don't spill the liquid, but still, with the sealing cap on, the volatile liquid evaporates and after several days/weeks, the liquid disappeares from the bottle completely.

Any idea where to buy good dispensing bottle guaranteed to hold the volatile liquid at least for months?
 

Online Alex Eisenhut

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Re: 100% sealed dispensing bottle
« Reply #1 on: May 21, 2024, 06:41:02 pm »
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Offline gaminnTopic starter

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Re: 100% sealed dispensing bottle
« Reply #2 on: May 21, 2024, 06:58:27 pm »
Thanks. Those Menda bottles are designed for flux dispensing. Hopefully they can also hold extremely volatile liquid. They are available on Mouser, I will try.

Anyone another idea?
 

Offline Sal Ammoniac

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Re: 100% sealed dispensing bottle
« Reply #3 on: May 21, 2024, 07:12:54 pm »
Hi,
I'm looking for a dispensing bottle for highly volatile liquid like the one in the picture. Ideally transparent one, compatible with standard dispensing needles, squeezable, 20 - 50 ml volume.

I tried many bottles, mainly from AliExpress. The cheapest ones are useless, they spill the liquid itself when dispensing. The more expensive ones don't spill the liquid, but still, with the sealing cap on, the volatile liquid evaporates and after several days/weeks, the liquid disappeares from the bottle completely.

Any idea where to buy good dispensing bottle guaranteed to hold the volatile liquid at least for months?

What liquid are you talking about here? Flux (which generally isn't very volatile) or something like ether (which is)?
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Offline gaminnTopic starter

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Re: 100% sealed dispensing bottle
« Reply #4 on: May 21, 2024, 07:20:04 pm »
Dichlormethane. I think it is as volatile as ether.
 

Offline PlainName

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Re: 100% sealed dispensing bottle
« Reply #5 on: May 21, 2024, 07:33:24 pm »
Perhaps try similar to these: https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B08ML9MMXJ

Yep, they are cheap rubbish and which you've no doubt already tried - they leak from the lid. The trick is to just put an o-ring in the lid and they then seal perfectly. The cover for the tip stops then evaporating when not in use. And they're cheap enough you can try lots of different ways to have it not work :)

The o-ring trick would probably fix all the ones you got off Aliexpress too. But these have the tip sock, which is pretty important if the contents are volatile.
 

Offline Sal Ammoniac

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Re: 100% sealed dispensing bottle
« Reply #6 on: May 21, 2024, 07:34:31 pm »
Some plastics are permeable to organic solvents like dichloromethane, so even if the bottle is capped, the solvent will seem to magically disappear. Your best bet might be a glass bottle.
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Offline gaminnTopic starter

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Re: 100% sealed dispensing bottle
« Reply #7 on: May 21, 2024, 07:37:56 pm »
Thanks for all the information. I need squeezable bottle, glass bottle won't allow controllable dispensing.
 

Offline Sal Ammoniac

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Re: 100% sealed dispensing bottle
« Reply #8 on: May 21, 2024, 07:40:34 pm »
Thanks for all the information. I need squeezable bottle, glass bottle won't allow controllable dispensing.

In that case, perhaps the best solution is to keep the dichloromethane in a glass bottle when you're not using it and transfer it to the plastic squeeze bottle when you need it.
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Offline gaminnTopic starter

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Re: 100% sealed dispensing bottle
« Reply #9 on: May 21, 2024, 07:42:32 pm »
https://www.sciencemadness.org/talk/viewthread.php?tid=4660

Yes, it looks like one solution is to keep the plastic bottle inside e.g. glass bottle.

However I purchased dichlormethane in a glass bottle still with PLASTIC cap and a white round gasket made from some plastic and it seems the bottle will be able to hold DCM indefinitely.
« Last Edit: May 21, 2024, 07:55:01 pm by gaminn »
 

Offline Sal Ammoniac

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Re: 100% sealed dispensing bottle
« Reply #10 on: May 21, 2024, 08:14:18 pm »
There are many kinds of "plastic" and not all of them are permeable to solvents like DCM. I suspect something like PTFE wouldn't be permeable to DCM, so perhaps that's what the gasket in your glass bottle is made of.
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Online thm_w

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Re: 100% sealed dispensing bottle
« Reply #11 on: May 21, 2024, 10:31:02 pm »
Use a glass container for storage (with PTFE lid washer as mentioned), then use something only to temporarily dispense it. HDPE or PP bottle or syringe.

Quote
Methylene chloride
HDPE at 20°C: shows some effect after 7 days.
LDPE at 20°C-50°C & HDPE at 50°C: Immediate damage may occur. Not recommended for continuous use.

Perhaps try similar to these: https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B08ML9MMXJ

Yep, they are cheap rubbish and which you've no doubt already tried - they leak from the lid. The trick is to just put an o-ring in the lid and they then seal perfectly. The cover for the tip stops then evaporating when not in use. And they're cheap enough you can try lots of different ways to have it not work :)

The o-ring trick would probably fix all the ones you got off Aliexpress too. But these have the tip sock, which is pretty important if the contents are volatile.

Must be luck of the supplier, but I have these and they never leak.
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Offline notsob

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Re: 100% sealed dispensing bottle
« Reply #12 on: May 22, 2024, 05:20:45 am »
I've had this bottle for decades no idea where i got it from.
Label on bottle is:
Mizim Mfg  Co.
Box 102
Hazel Park, Mich.
Pat. App'd. For.

Probably no longer exist.
The top centre part is pushed in to open squeeze bottle and pulled back out to close.
Still works - has had ISO in it for over 20 years - never leaked.
 

Online Halcyon

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Re: 100% sealed dispensing bottle
« Reply #13 on: May 22, 2024, 07:44:16 am »
Would a piece of tape (Kapton, regular sticky tape) folded over itself at the tip of the nozzle be sufficient?
 

Offline PlainName

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Re: 100% sealed dispensing bottle
« Reply #14 on: May 22, 2024, 08:45:36 am »
Yep, they are cheap rubbish and which you've no doubt already tried - they leak from the lid. The trick is to just put an o-ring in the lid and they then seal perfectly.

Must be luck of the supplier, but I have these and they never leak.

Maybe. I use them to store thin oil for hair clippers and chainsaw, so they get tossed in a bag and end up inverted or bashed around. Every one I've used like that has leaked, whereas ones I sit on the desk for dropping tiny drops of whatever onto a PCB don't. But then the ones on a desk are never left inverted and the leak can be quite slow so it's not immediately obvious, even after a refill, unless they're left inverted for some time.
 
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Online coppercone2

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Re: 100% sealed dispensing bottle
« Reply #15 on: May 22, 2024, 08:48:53 am »
seriously doubt you will contain that in a squeeze bottle
 

Offline tggzzz

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Re: 100% sealed dispensing bottle
« Reply #16 on: May 22, 2024, 09:10:01 am »
If a dispensing bottle is "100%" sealed, it cannot dispense.

As I expect you realise, it is not a safe chemical to inhale, and it can be absorbed through the skin.

I keep my methylene chloride in a garden shed, only use it in the open. When using it to repair cracks in plastic, I only remove tiny amounts on the tip of a screwdriver.
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Offline Sal Ammoniac

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Re: 100% sealed dispensing bottle
« Reply #17 on: May 22, 2024, 03:49:45 pm »
Would a piece of tape (Kapton, regular sticky tape) folded over itself at the tip of the nozzle be sufficient?

No, not in this case. The plastic bottle itself is permeable to the stuff he's storing in it (dichloromethane AKA methylene chloride) and capping the nozzle won't prevent that.
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Offline Sal Ammoniac

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Re: 100% sealed dispensing bottle
« Reply #18 on: May 22, 2024, 03:52:00 pm »
I keep my methylene chloride in a garden shed, only use it in the open. When using it to repair cracks in plastic, I only remove tiny amounts on the tip of a screwdriver.

In organic chem classes in university, we used to use methylene chloride to wash ground glass joint grease off our hands. Times have changed...
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Offline gaminnTopic starter

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Re: 100% sealed dispensing bottle
« Reply #19 on: May 22, 2024, 05:07:21 pm »
I also store hazardous chemicals outside the place I live and when using it I'm cautious and limit my exposure to it. I use dichlormethane to bond cracked plastic parts so I'm using only several drops of it each time. From what I read, in past dichlormethane was used in paint strippers where the exposure must have been an orders of magnitude greater.
 

Offline Sal Ammoniac

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Re: 100% sealed dispensing bottle
« Reply #20 on: May 22, 2024, 06:02:54 pm »
I also store hazardous chemicals outside the place I live and when using it I'm cautious and limit my exposure to it. I use dichlormethane to bond cracked plastic parts so I'm using only several drops of it each time. From what I read, in past dichlormethane was used in paint strippers where the exposure must have been an orders of magnitude greater.

Exposure concerns are mainly for people exposed to the substances on a regular basis, for example workers in a factory that are exposed for an entire working day. Occasional exposure to most of these things, such as for limited hobby use, is not going to have the same effect as breathing something for hours every day. It's still wise to exercise reasonable caution when handling potentially hazardous substances.
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Offline tggzzz

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Re: 100% sealed dispensing bottle
« Reply #21 on: May 22, 2024, 06:09:56 pm »
From what I read, in past dichlormethane was used in paint strippers where the exposure must have been an orders of magnitude greater.

It was also the principal ingredient of "liquid sander", used to prepare old paint surfaces for coating with a new layer of paint.

I was most irritated when I found it was no longer available, since now I'll have to use "sugar soap" and sandpaper on external painted wood :(
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Offline EPAIII

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Re: 100% sealed dispensing bottle
« Reply #22 on: May 26, 2024, 09:12:16 am »
I don't know about your chemicals, but I use squeeze bottles like these in my shop.

<attachment is below>

The small bottle is a generic, saline nasal spray. OK, the one in the photo is not generic, but I found the generic ones had bottles that were just as good, if not better and they cost less. They can be either round or football shaped and the squirting top is removable with a moderate hand twist. I pop the tops off and pour out the saline solution then rinse well. I have used these for years and the tops seem to never wear out from assembly and disassembly.

For some uses I just keep the original orifice size and spray as needed. Sometimes I enlarge the original opening with a pin or small drill bit. If I want more liquid at a time I will drill out that original orifice with a 1/16" / 1.5mm drill bit and insert a leftover "straw" from an aerosol spray bottle (oil, WD-40, etc.) I always keep the "straws" when I throw the cans away; they can be used for many things. The "straw" can be cut to any length desired. The plastic used for the tops is somewhat elastic, so it forms a nice friction fit and seal as the hole size will be smaller than the drill bit used to enlarge the opening. The "straw" is small enough so there is no leakage if the bottle tips over and they can be left uncapped for an indefinite time period with little or no loss. And the "straw" can be pulled in or out as needed for more or less reach.

The larger bottle was purchased from McMaster. I gave up with other suppliers after trying several similar bottles and found them to leak when squeezed or tipped over. I have not been disappointed in anything I have purchased from McMaster. I have also added those spray can "straws" to this kind of bottle.

I have a third size of bottle, also from McMaster, that is between the two sizes shown in the photo. They are sold specifically as oil bottles. I almost always add the "straws" to them.

So far all three of these squeeze bottles have worked OK for every type of fluid I have filled them with. Of course, YMMV.
« Last Edit: May 26, 2024, 09:33:57 am by EPAIII »
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