Author Topic: 10A 1.2-45V power supply schematic  (Read 18883 times)

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Offline uranium235

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10A 1.2-45V power supply schematic
« on: June 14, 2010, 04:39:08 pm »
guys im looking for 1.2-45V 10A linear regulated power supply with current limit and short circuit protection schematic tnx  ;D  ;D

alm

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Re: 10A 1.2-45V power supply schematic
« Reply #1 on: June 14, 2010, 05:27:46 pm »
Take any good linear bench supply schematic, make sure the power transistors and other related components can withstand the 55V or so input voltage, and put a bunch of power transistors in parallel (might have to increase the base current). Note you will need some serious cooling (1.2V at 10A is more than 500W of dissipation!). Using a 2x20V transformer and switching the second winding off below 20V or so will halve that, but ~270W is still a lot).
 

Offline sigxcpu

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Re: 10A 1.2-45V power supply schematic
« Reply #2 on: June 14, 2010, 08:26:57 pm »
Hm, I don't understand.
First, 1.2V@10A cannot be >500W. Maybe 45V@10A comes closer.
Second, why do you consider that the power dissipated equals the power created? Then what is left for your consumer, this being the first reason for building a supply?
 

alm

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Re: 10A 1.2-45V power supply schematic
« Reply #3 on: June 14, 2010, 08:37:59 pm »
I was talking about a linear supply (which was the original question). A linear supply decreases the voltage by converting the rest to heat. So a 50V input with a 25V output means 50% of the energy is converted to heat. With 55V input (estimate for 45V output, depends on the voltage drop over the power transistors) and 1.2V output at 10A, this would mean (55V-1.2V) * 10A is converted to heat. So in the worst case scenario (10A in a dead short), dissipation is almost equal to the maximum power (minus a few hundred mV or so over the short times the current).
 

Offline Kiriakos-GR

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Re: 10A 1.2-45V power supply schematic
« Reply #4 on: June 14, 2010, 09:04:18 pm »
Lets see some real facts ..  :)

This is an 35V 10A  ... check out the Fuse rates VS input voltage , so to realize that this devices are not cheap toys.


« Last Edit: June 14, 2010, 09:10:59 pm by Kiriakos-GR »
 

Offline saturation

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Re: 10A 1.2-45V power supply schematic
« Reply #5 on: June 14, 2010, 10:05:03 pm »
Those Kenwood PSU are all Japanese good supplies.  Expensive to get here, used to be the 'cheapo' PSU in Asia before China and when the US dominated the test equipment market.

Updated model still made today.




http://www.tequipment.net/KenwoodPD36-10A.html



Lets see some real facts ..  :)

This is an 35V 10A  ... check out the Fuse rates VS input voltage , so to realize that this devices are not cheap toys.



Best Wishes,

 Saturation
 

alm

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Re: 10A 1.2-45V power supply schematic
« Reply #6 on: June 14, 2010, 10:09:53 pm »
Yep, that's some real cooling ;D. Something like that (with a really powerful fan) would probably suffice.
 

Offline uranium235

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Re: 10A 1.2-45V power supply schematic
« Reply #7 on: June 15, 2010, 07:15:00 am »
i know that it would produce much heat when dropping the voltage im designing the entire case as a heatsink and high power fans 12v @ 0.9A

im currently looking into switching regulators as my other option and the availability of the parts localy

Offline Kiriakos-GR

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Re: 10A 1.2-45V power supply schematic
« Reply #8 on: June 15, 2010, 07:17:37 pm »
Those Kenwood PSU are all Japanese good supplies.

Expensive to get here, used to be the 'cheapo' PSU in Asia before China and when the US dominated the test equipment market.



I think that you over reacting ...  ;D    The only place that the American test equipment, have some acceptance , are in the U.S.A. continent ..

I think that you are an over passioned with your flag ..

And even if the Americans like to believe  that they got first on the Moon , all the planet are aware of,
that the Russians did it first ..


About the Kenwood PSU ,  its one indestructible  monster , very heavy even to lift ,
every five years or so , I open it up and just blow the dust away ..

The specific model , as it looks at the back of it , it has extra outputs , and extra connectors ,
so to operate it remotely , or by external  potentiometer . 

Its called as specialized for laboratories ,  because its made for 24/24 365X what ever .. operation  ;D 
If you build a bulb , you can test it for how many thousands of hours it will keep working , with this PSU.

With all this facts in mind ,  the 1.500$  , its a fair price for it.       






 

Offline kc1980

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Re: 10A 1.2-45V power supply schematic
« Reply #9 on: June 15, 2010, 08:03:30 pm »
I'm no circuit design expert, but I was in the middle of designing a linear power supply for myself with those specs.  I'm planning to use a variac transformer to limit the power dissipation during low voltage / high current situations.  It does make the unit somewhat bulky and inconvenient to handle but I think it's worth it.
 

Offline Kiriakos-GR

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Re: 10A 1.2-45V power supply schematic
« Reply #10 on: June 15, 2010, 08:54:39 pm »
I'm no circuit design expert, but I was in the middle of designing a linear power supply for myself with those specs. 

Your main enemy are the ripple , and the stability.
If you deal somehow with that , the rest part has lower difficulty .   
 

Offline Zad

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Re: 10A 1.2-45V power supply schematic
« Reply #11 on: June 15, 2010, 09:08:43 pm »
Many linear-only PSUs use a transformer with a multi-tap output winding (say 5v, 10v, 15....) which is usually switched in by relay. This clearly reduces the maximum amount you have to dissipate from the regulator transistor. Another increasingly popular method is to use a switched mode PSU to pre-regulate it, then follow up with a linear regulator.

Offline saturation

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Re: 10A 1.2-45V power supply schematic
« Reply #12 on: June 15, 2010, 09:35:56 pm »
In 1980s Kenwood was a well known superb brand but low cost when it was known by its older name Trio, then Trio-Kenwood. After it became Kenwood, all their test equipment prices just flew.  Trio was very popular in the Pacific, great quality, low cost.

http://www.fundinguniverse.com/company-histories/Kenwood-Corporation-Company-History.html

In the 1980s, a number of at least, I recall, BK Precision gear was rebadged Trios.

http://www.picbasic.co.uk/forum/showthread.php?t=7019&s=8bb42a46c747e65f3dde96e42b571426&p=43307#post43307



Today, they are a big name, some of their budget gear could be rebranded Mastech while the true made in Japan ones are the top of the line.








Those Kenwood PSU are all Japanese good supplies.

Expensive to get here, used to be the 'cheapo' PSU in Asia before China and when the US dominated the test equipment market.



I think that you over reacting ...  ;D    The only place that the American test equipment, have some acceptance , are in the U.S.A. continent ..

I think that you are an over passioned with your flag ..

And even if the Americans like to believe  that they got first on the Moon , all the planet are aware of,
that the Russians did it first ..


About the Kenwood PSU ,  its one indestructible  monster , very heavy even to lift ,
every five years or so , I open it up and just blow the dust away ..

The specific model , as it looks at the back of it , it has extra outputs , and extra connectors ,
so to operate it remotely , or by external  potentiometer .  

Its called as specialized for laboratories ,  because its made for 24/24 365X what ever .. operation  ;D  
If you build a bulb , you can test it for how many thousands of hours it will keep working , with this PSU.

With all this facts in mind ,  the 1.500$  , its a fair price for it.      







Best Wishes,

 Saturation
 

Offline Kiriakos-GR

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Re: 10A 1.2-45V power supply schematic
« Reply #13 on: June 15, 2010, 10:34:03 pm »
In 1980s Kenwood was a well known superb..........

Do not ever , travel me that far back ... I loose my orientation, and I became unstable   ;D ;D ;D
 

Offline Zero999

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Re: 10A 1.2-45V power supply schematic
« Reply #14 on: June 16, 2010, 10:04:43 pm »
If you use a transformer with a centre tap, you can draw the power from the centre tap when the output voltage is low which will save power dissipation in the power transistors.

For example, for 45V, use a transformer with twin 18V secondaries connected in series, when the output voltage is set below 18V draw the power from the centre tap and when the output voltage is set above 19V (there needs to be some hysteresis to avoid oscillation) draw the power from both windings.

If you're able to wind your own transformer, you could use many voltage taps to save even more power, for example if you have a tap every 9V you can limit the voltage drop across the transistors to 12v.
 

Offline uranium235

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Re: 10A 1.2-45V power supply schematic
« Reply #15 on: June 17, 2010, 04:03:57 am »
so i would be very hard to drop the votlage at 45v to 1.2v and would waste alot of heat dropping the voltage?

alm

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Re: 10A 1.2-45V power supply schematic
« Reply #16 on: June 17, 2010, 05:20:04 am »
Dropping the voltage isn't that hard, but the current means you need a bunch of power transistors in parallel, and it will generate lots of heat.
 

Offline Zero999

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Re: 10A 1.2-45V power supply schematic
« Reply #17 on: June 17, 2010, 11:23:11 am »
so i would be very hard to drop the votlage at 45v to 1.2v and would waste alot of heat dropping the voltage?

Yes it wastes a lot of heat but you shouldn't need to drop 45V down to 1.2V.
 

Offline uranium235

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Re: 10A 1.2-45V power supply schematic
« Reply #18 on: June 17, 2010, 02:18:19 pm »
so i would be very hard to drop the votlage at 45v to 1.2v and would waste alot of heat dropping the voltage?

Yes it wastes a lot of heat but you shouldn't need to drop 45V down to 1.2V.

i think it wont heat to much if your load @ 1.2v required is minimal peferably 0.5A to 1A

alm

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Re: 10A 1.2-45V power supply schematic
« Reply #19 on: June 17, 2010, 10:47:57 pm »
Sure, if you limit the current at lower voltages (combined with the trick of multiple transformer windings), you can limit dissipation. I would want some sort of limit, so you can't accidentally set it too high at low voltage.
 

Offline uranium235

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Re: 10A 1.2-45V power supply schematic
« Reply #20 on: July 08, 2010, 05:43:55 pm »
since i cant find a schematic i decided to design one based on the typical aplication figure 2. on the datasheet

i aready done it in simulation using proteus it work fine

the problem is LM723 R4, RV1 R5 heats up

im thinking on R4, RV1, and R5 ive use low wattage resistor and too much current at LM723

the voltage at lm723 is at 33-34v ive change 1N4751 to 1N4752

im still thinking other possible problem

if anyone notice any problem on the circuit please post

heres the data sheet
http://www.datasheetcatalog.org/datasheet/nationalsemiconductor/DS008563.PDF

schem

Offline Zero999

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Re: 10A 1.2-45V power supply schematic
« Reply #21 on: July 08, 2010, 06:04:35 pm »
Q1 to Q6 don't have any emitter resistors which are required to ensure good current sharing.
 

Online NiHaoMike

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Re: 10A 1.2-45V power supply schematic
« Reply #22 on: July 08, 2010, 10:46:51 pm »
Use a buck converter, either by itself or as a preregulator.
Cryptocurrency has taught me to love math and at the same time be baffled by it.

Cryptocurrency lesson 0: Altcoins and Bitcoin are not the same thing.
 

Offline uranium235

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Re: 10A 1.2-45V power supply schematic
« Reply #23 on: July 09, 2010, 04:02:53 am »
Q1 to Q6 don't have any emitter resistors which are required to ensure good current sharing.

i already done that when i build the circuit i just forgot to put it in the diagram ive use 1 ohm 5watt per emitter

Use a buck converter, either by itself or as a preregulator.
its a good idea but im minimizing the use of components

Offline Zero999

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Re: 10A 1.2-45V power supply schematic
« Reply #24 on: July 09, 2010, 08:24:06 am »
A buck converter would probably be smaller and possibly cheaper when the size of the heat sink is taken into account.

Modern SMPS controllers also require minimum components, even less than the above circuit.
 


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