Author Topic: Alfred Leitner - Liquid Helium and Superfluidity 1963  (Read 846 times)

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Offline Homer J Simpson

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Alfred Leitner - Liquid Helium and Superfluidity 1963
« on: August 23, 2018, 12:44:54 pm »

 
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Offline BrianHG

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Re: Alfred Leitner - Liquid Helium and Superfluidity 1963
« Reply #1 on: August 25, 2018, 04:54:28 am »
Those super-fluid properties are weirder than I originally thought.  It has no viscosity, yet, you can still stir the fluid and still have reactionary flow.  Also, that weird effect of the fluid instantly becoming 1000x more thermal conduction than copper the moment it passes that temperature threshold, or, over 1000000 times more thermal conductive than 1 second just before the superfluid transition point lambda.

It's definitely worth the watch...
« Last Edit: August 26, 2018, 12:43:33 am by BrianHG »
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Offline raptor1956

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Re: Alfred Leitner - Liquid Helium and Superfluidity 1963
« Reply #2 on: August 25, 2018, 05:56:47 am »
That was a very interesting video, it always amazes me to think of what they were capable of doing with technology that's 55 years old.  Impressive.


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Online Tomorokoshi

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Re: Alfred Leitner - Liquid Helium and Superfluidity 1963
« Reply #3 on: August 27, 2018, 03:59:48 am »
Very interesting series.
 

Online T3sl4co1l

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Re: Alfred Leitner - Liquid Helium and Superfluidity 1963
« Reply #4 on: August 27, 2018, 05:04:24 am »
Those super-fluid properties are weirder than I originally thought.  It has no viscosity, yet, you can still stir the fluid and still have reactionary flow.

I recall something about Feynman having a go at the problem, and -- while not coming to a conclusive answer, unsurprisingly as condensed-matter physics is notoriously difficult and we still don't have one today(?) -- figured there were quantum vortices, i.e., the vorticity and inertia will be quantized.

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