Author Topic: ARM vs. PIC  (Read 7983 times)

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Offline DavidDLC

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ARM vs. PIC
« on: December 08, 2010, 07:53:47 pm »
I haven't work with ARM yet

Is there too much difference let's say to switch from PIC to ARM ?

Please give me some advice on this.
 

Offline tyblu

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Re: ARM vs. PIC
« Reply #1 on: December 08, 2010, 08:39:00 pm »
Cortex-M3 vs PIC32?
Tyler Lucas, electronics hobbyist
 

Offline DavidDLC

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Re: ARM vs. PIC
« Reply #2 on: December 08, 2010, 08:50:36 pm »
I will say Cortex.
 

Offline PsI-On

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Re: ARM vs. PIC
« Reply #3 on: December 08, 2010, 09:47:20 pm »
I'd also vote for Cortex-M3
 

Offline tyblu

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Re: ARM vs. PIC
« Reply #4 on: December 08, 2010, 10:00:15 pm »
I don't think it's a matter of preference; he wants to know the differences between the two.
Tyler Lucas, electronics hobbyist
 

Offline Bambur

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Re: ARM vs. PIC
« Reply #5 on: December 09, 2010, 11:31:12 am »
How about tools availability for ARM, i.e. cross-compilers (and possibly debuggers)?
 

Offline joelby

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Re: ARM vs. PIC
« Reply #6 on: December 09, 2010, 12:57:55 pm »
Many different ARM licensees, vs. only one PIC manufacturer?

Not that it's necessarily easy to switch between ARMs from different companies.
 

Offline TheDirty

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Re: ARM vs. PIC
« Reply #7 on: December 10, 2010, 05:00:32 pm »
The two things that make it difficult to go Cortex-M3 rather than PIC would be the packages (only QFP and QFN) and the toolchains.  Your options for the toolchains that aren't 1000's of $$ are either pay a reduced amount for a non-commercial license and unlimited or high limited compiler (Rowley, CodeRed...); Try to use the free GCC/Eclipse toolchains, which are not as mature as say the AVR ones; Or just go with one of the code size limited toolchains if that's all you'll ever need.

Otherwise the Cortex-M3's peripherals are dependent on the manufacturer and usually they are pretty nice and simple.  It helps that they are newer designs.  Only the ARM CM3 core is the same across the manufacturers, all the peripherals will be different, so you just can't port code from one directly to the other without peripheral changes in your code.  I have worked with both Stellaris and LPC and I haven't found porting all that difficult, though.  So much easier than ARM7, where the peripherals are generally a crazy complicated nightmare.

The manufacturers all have peripheral libraries available for the chips already.

Also it's not so easy to get a cheap SWD compatible in circuit programming/debugging.  SWD (Serial Wire Debug) is a simpler 2 wire programming and debugging interface that CM3 supports.  Many chips still support JTAG as well as SWD, but some chips like the LPC13xx and LPC11xx only support SWD, so you would need an SWD programmer in order to use them.
Mark Higgins
 


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