Author Topic: Australia data encryption law  (Read 3862 times)

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Offline Brumby

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Re: Australia data encryption law
« Reply #75 on: January 27, 2019, 02:51:00 am »
I'd really like for this topic to get back on track - and stay civil.  Unfortunately, it is inescapably tied to politics, which does not bode well.
 

Online beanflying

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Re: Australia data encryption law
« Reply #76 on: January 27, 2019, 03:42:04 am »
They can just save the effort and learn what China did on the same case.
We just don't allow end-to-end encryption. You can do that privately, but no public commercial communication platforms (apps, websites) are allowed to offer such service.
Saves the government's time and taxpayers' money.
.......
That's what comes to you if you defy the government. Be wise.

Please let me know how this statement doesn't conflict with what I think you are meaning here in this statement?

It.only takes one cybercop to step out to blow the entire conspiracy if there is one.

And, what do you think IA does?

Also, being a cop, one is also a people of the country. As long as there is a single non corrupted cop in the team, there will be supervision.

One one hand you say it is done for the people and it should be accepted without question at peril to the citizens and then you are now saying for 'one' person to stand up for the majority?

and then this?

What I promote is that governments should have power over the people, but in the other way around, the people should have oversight over the government.

I am not sure what you really think or if you in fact know? You seem to say one should stand up but not stand up in case you get into trouble? Then the last quote of yours you say the people should have a say in what the government does and acts most certainly not how China works so what do you actually believe in Freedom or Totalitarianism or just simply shut up and take what the State says is correct?

Government cloak and dagger is a fact of life in all countries and in this current time those of us in Western Democracies for their failings can stand up and say NO without being put in jail and generally whistle blowers get heard at a minimum. This legislation turning us toward the Chinese style on internet surveillance is out of order and allows our Federal Government to do what it likes 'legally' (questionable) to surveil anyone it wants to in the electronic sense without any oversight.

This is 'Democracy in Crisis' and it is a problem if it is allowed to stand.
Coffee, Food, R/C and electronics nerd in no particular order :)
 

Online blueskull

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Re: Australia data encryption law
« Reply #77 on: January 27, 2019, 04:03:11 am »
Please let me know how this statement doesn't conflict with what I think you are meaning here in this statement?

One one hand you say it is done for the people and it should be accepted without question at peril to the citizens and then you are now saying for 'one' person to stand up for the majority?

I am not sure what you really think or if you in fact know? You seem to say one should stand up but not stand up in case you get into trouble? Then the last quote of yours you say the people should have a say in what the government does and acts most certainly not how China works so what do you actually believe in Freedom or Totalitarianism or just simply shut up and take what the State says is correct?

Government cloak and dagger is a fact of life in all countries and in this current time those of us in Western Democracies for their failings can stand up and say NO without being put in jail and generally whistle blowers get heard at a minimum. This legislation turning us toward the Chinese style on internet surveillance is out of order and allows our Federal Government to do what it likes 'legally' (questionable) to surveil anyone it wants to in the electronic sense without any oversight.

This is 'Democracy in Crisis' and it is a problem if it is allowed to stand.

Put it simple, shut up and make big money (quoted from former Chinese president Jiang).

If my own interest is invaded, and my gain expectancy if I speak out outweighs my loss expectancy, then I speak out.

If not, why would I bother getting myself into troubles?

If I see other people's interest being invaded, I evaluate the situation.

Will I be the next in foreseeable future? If so, I will do the same loss weighing thing.

If not, I will see if I can put my self on the benefacted side of the scale, if so, I go for it.

If not, I keep my silence.
 

Offline cdev

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Re: Australia data encryption law
« Reply #78 on: January 27, 2019, 04:50:58 am »
According to the Globalization Trilemma

"democracy, national sovereignty and global economic integration are mutually incompatible: we can combine any two of the three, but never have all three simultaneously and in full."

This is not disputed, everybody seems to agree its true. Even the Davos folk write about it on their web site.

So it seems we got hyperglobalization and lost the democracy, somewhere along the road, was it taken? I don't remember ever voting for this hyperglobalization thing. Did any of you?

So we ALL have this problem, lack of legitimacy of the things that are being done. Seems to me it is, anyway.
"What the large print giveth, the small print taketh away."
 

Offline apis

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Re: Australia data encryption law
« Reply #79 on: January 27, 2019, 05:45:50 am »
So it seems we got hyperglobalization and lost the democracy, somewhere along the road, was it taken? I don't remember ever voting for this hyperglobalization thing. Did any of you?
Maybe people didn't vote for globalisation but people certainly have been voting for the politicians promoting it, it wasn't called hyperglobalisation and it wasn't mentioned much so maybe they just didn't understand what was going on. But it's not like it's been a big secret either. A lot of political issues never gets mentioned in the media but they still get debated in the parliaments and different political parties have different opinions about them. People have been voting for big business interests for a long time, and globalisation has been a long time goal for multinational corporations since it's more profitable for them. Like free trade agreement and the Investor-state dispute settlement mechanisms, there are politicians that oppose it but it's generally not the ones the majority votes for.
 


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