Author Topic: Basic Soldering Lesson 1 - Old School  (Read 6046 times)

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Online xrunner

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Offline P90

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Re: Basic Soldering Lesson 1 - Old School
« Reply #1 on: May 14, 2017, 04:10:17 am »
Wonder if those are Yihua irons? LOL
 
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Offline retiredcaps

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Re: Basic Soldering Lesson 1 - Old School
« Reply #2 on: May 14, 2017, 04:42:09 am »
These Pace videos have been mentioned here before and they, despite being old, are my favourite and best soldering videos.  :-+
 
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Offline tooki

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Re: Basic Soldering Lesson 1 - Old School
« Reply #3 on: May 14, 2017, 04:22:33 pm »
Wonder if those are Yihua irons? LOL
Hmmm, if only the company that made these videos had put their name or logo or something on them... Oh wait, they did.

(And they're the company that more or less invented modern rework soldering equipment.)
 

Offline Darren

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Re: Basic Soldering Lesson 1 - Old School
« Reply #4 on: May 14, 2017, 04:37:14 pm »
What is this soddering they speak of?
 
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Online xrunner

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Re: Basic Soldering Lesson 1 - Old School
« Reply #5 on: May 14, 2017, 04:51:15 pm »
What is this soddering they speak of?

It's right here - check the pronunciation - you can hear it pronounced at the link  :-+

Quote
solder noun [ U ] us ? /?s?d·?r/
?
a type of soft metal that is melted to join separate metal parts which are then permanently attached when the metal cools

http://dictionary.cambridge.org/us/dictionary/english/solder
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Offline tooki

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Re: Basic Soldering Lesson 1 - Old School
« Reply #6 on: May 14, 2017, 09:06:19 pm »
What is this soddering they speak of?
Do any English people exist who don't get smug about the North American pronunciation of "solder"?
 
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Offline Darren

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Re: Basic Soldering Lesson 1 - Old School
« Reply #7 on: May 14, 2017, 09:36:43 pm »
I just sounds so wrong, not just that there is an 'L' in solder but sodder sounds like something the Catholic Church is famous for, or if you want to be a bit more politically correct it sounds like someone that lays lawns. Solder is from the Latin solidare "to make solid. To say sodder instead of solder would also mean you should also say sodid instead of solid. PS, not all Americans say sodder.
 

Offline tooki

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Re: Basic Soldering Lesson 1 - Old School
« Reply #8 on: May 14, 2017, 10:04:58 pm »
Let's clear up some misinformation.

1. The English word "solder" actually derived from the French soudure and the Latin-derived L was added back to the written word later. So as is usually the case when British and American pronunciation have diverged over time, it's actually the American usage that has retained the original form. (For example, the contrasting "a" sounds in can and can't in British English is often trotted out as an example of American "laziness" in English, when in fact, British English used the same "a" sound in can and can't until long after the American colonies were established. The contrasting "a" was a change that happened later in British English only.) 

2. Do you pronounce the L in "walk", "talk", "half", etc? No? How about colonel? Lieutenant? Worcester? Cough? OK, so we've established that English doesn't have a 1:1 correspondence of spelling to pronunciation. (Cf. ghoti) And what about the many English accents that turn L into a W sound in many positions? (Think cold -> cowd.)

3. American English doesn't use the verb "sod" you're thinking of (we do have the noun for the pregrown grass to plant in the garden), so for us, it doesn't have the double-entendre it does for you.

Quote
To say sodder instead of solder would also mean you should also say sodid instead of solid. PS, not all Americans say sodder.
4. Ummm, no. As explained, since the word "solder" didn't come directly from solidare, but from the (already L-less) French soudure, there's no direct process that led to the loss of the L sound within English. Moreover, in your example, the word "solid" doesn't contain the "ld" combination at issue. If anything, it would be solid -> sod. But no way would it become sodid.

5. Yep, some Americans pronounce the L in solder because they're pronouncing it phonetically. So you do hear it sometimes, but it's considered non-standard in American English.
« Last Edit: May 15, 2017, 12:02:07 am by tooki »
 

Online xrunner

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Re: Basic Soldering Lesson 1 - Old School
« Reply #9 on: May 14, 2017, 10:21:00 pm »
To say sodder instead of solder would also mean you should also say sodid instead of solid. PS, not all Americans say sodder.

So every letter in a word must be sounded out, according to your thinking?

How do you pronounce these words -

pneumatic
listen
aisle
column
... (I could go on)


I rest my case.
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Offline DimitriP

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Re: Basic Soldering Lesson 1 - Old School
« Reply #10 on: May 14, 2017, 11:27:31 pm »
No matter how it's pronounced,
some can do it with a firestick and some can't , not even with a $1000 "soldering station".





   If three 100  Ohm resistors are connected in parallel, and in series with a 200 Ohm resistor, how many resistors do you have? 
 
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Offline Electro Detective

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Re: Basic Soldering Lesson 1 - Old School
« Reply #11 on: May 16, 2017, 11:19:24 pm »
At the end of the day, the word is SOLDER with an L

not SODDER, SATA or SAR-DUR  (evil ruler of the galaxy? :scared:)

Many thanks to some of the better Youtubers for making the effort to say 'SOLDER'  in their videos   :-+

It really is appreciated and doesn't sound weird in the middle of a full on repair vid   :popcorn:
 

Online xrunner

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Re: Basic Soldering Lesson 1 - Old School
« Reply #12 on: May 16, 2017, 11:23:10 pm »
At the end of the day, the word is SOLDER with an L

not SODDER, SATA or SAR-DUR  (evil ruler of the galaxy? :scared:)

Uh no, sorry not accepted.  :)

Not all letters in many words are pronounced, but you knew that right?

But in case you didn't, see my post above because you obviously missed it.  ::)
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Offline Electro Detective

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Re: Basic Soldering Lesson 1 - Old School
« Reply #13 on: May 16, 2017, 11:40:03 pm »
At the end of the day, the word is SOLDER with an L

not SODDER, SATA or SAR-DUR  (evil ruler of the galaxy? :scared:)

Uh no, sorry not accepted.  :)

Not all letters in many words are pronounced, but you knew that right?

But in case you didn't, see my post above because you obviously missed it.  ::)

On the contrary, I did read your fine post  :-+

But it needs to be sorted out once and for all,

it's either universally pronounced SOLDER or SODDER, and I'm easy either way to pronounce either, based on what the majority decide.

But I will have to stock up on lame excuses to supply inquisitive people why I write down the word SOLDER and yet pronounce it SODDER   ;D

Time for an EEVblog poll perhaps ?    ::)
 

Offline P90

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Re: Basic Soldering Lesson 1 - Old School
« Reply #14 on: May 17, 2017, 12:59:46 am »
sodder sounds dirty.
soLder sounds right. Even the early 936 clones git it right, it said "SOL DERING" on the unit...
 

Offline tooki

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Re: Basic Soldering Lesson 1 - Old School
« Reply #15 on: May 17, 2017, 09:56:59 am »
At the end of the day, the word is SOLDER with an L

not SODDER, SATA or SAR-DUR  (evil ruler of the galaxy? :scared:)
But it needs to be sorted out once and for all,

it's either universally pronounced SOLDER or SODDER, and I'm easy either way to pronounce either, based on what the majority decide.
Well, no. The English language supports (in the sense of feature set) a) silent letters, and b) multiple pronunciations for a given word. Unless you're willing to excise all words from your vocabulary whose pronunciation doesn't match the spelling, then your argument is not valid.
« Last Edit: May 17, 2017, 09:58:57 am by tooki »
 

Offline Electro Detective

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Re: Basic Soldering Lesson 1 - Old School
« Reply #16 on: May 17, 2017, 10:16:44 am »
At the end of the day, the word is SOLDER with an L

not SODDER, SATA or SAR-DUR  (evil ruler of the galaxy? :scared:)
But it needs to be sorted out once and for all,

it's either universally pronounced SOLDER or SODDER, and I'm easy either way to pronounce either, based on what the majority decide.
Well, no. The English language supports (in the sense of feature set) a) silent letters, and b) multiple pronunciations for a given word. Unless you're willing to excise all words from your vocabulary whose pronunciation doesn't match the spelling, then your argument is not valid.

Where is the hard and fast rule in the English language that specifies people should still blindly support the ludicrous practice of not pronouncing letters that are there?  :-//

Imagine the violence erupting at a cattle auction when the auctioneer points at the highest bidder and shouts "SOD!" instead of SOLD   >:D
« Last Edit: May 17, 2017, 10:34:48 am by Electro Detective »
 

Offline yada

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Re: Basic Soldering Lesson 1 - Old School
« Reply #17 on: May 17, 2017, 10:54:21 am »
Way to go making something so simple so complicated. I think soldering pipes is harder then electronics. Ever had a pin hole leak in a hot water tank pipe? You have to drain the entire house's water pipes all over again. For some reason I can remember stuffing bread in the pipes, but then again I used to drink a lot and I could have just been fucking about.

The trick for me is apply the solder to the part, not the tip and touch a bit of solder to it to transfer heat before you solder. The 1980's seem so old. Funny to think that to make that video now it could all be done by a kid on you tube, not a dozen people and thousands in equipment.
 

Offline tooki

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Re: Basic Soldering Lesson 1 - Old School
« Reply #18 on: May 17, 2017, 07:33:25 pm »
The trick for me is apply the solder to the part, not the tip and touch a bit of solder to it to transfer heat before you solder.
That's not a "trick", that's literally the most important lesson in soldering technique. You tin the iron tip to create a heat bridge, heat the work, and then apply solder to the work, not the tip. Soldering 101.
 

Offline GreyWoolfe

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Re: Basic Soldering Lesson 1 - Old School
« Reply #19 on: May 17, 2017, 10:49:09 pm »
This SOD-DER vs SOL-DER debate reminds me of the code/no code debate in ham radio circles. :rant:  And just as interesting  :=\
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Offline SkyMaster

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Re: Basic Soldering Lesson 1 - Old School
« Reply #20 on: May 17, 2017, 11:52:27 pm »
What is this soddering they speak of?
Do any English people exist who don't get smug about the North American pronunciation of "solder"?

This is not the North American pronunciation of "solder".

 ;)
 

Offline tooki

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Re: Basic Soldering Lesson 1 - Old School
« Reply #21 on: May 18, 2017, 01:16:39 am »
This SOD-DER vs SOL-DER debate reminds me of the code/no code debate in ham radio circles. :rant:  And just as interesting  :=\
I'm not familiar with that debate, can you give me an executive summary?
 

Offline Electro Detective

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Re: Basic Soldering Lesson 1 - Old School
« Reply #22 on: May 19, 2017, 08:33:40 am »
Real men (and the few lurking real women) settle the SOD-DER vs SOL-DER debate with an EEVblog poll   >:D

Anyone up for it ?

and while we're on the subject is the 'L' pronounced in 'EEVblog', or silent  ?   :-//
« Last Edit: May 19, 2017, 08:37:36 am by Electro Detective »
 

Offline helius

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Re: Basic Soldering Lesson 1 - Old School
« Reply #23 on: May 19, 2017, 09:43:41 am »
This SOD-DER vs SOL-DER debate reminds me of the code/no code debate in ham radio circles. :rant:  And just as interesting  :=\
I'm not familiar with that debate, can you give me an executive summary?
It's been a while since I was following ham radio circles, but I think the debate is around whether an amateur radio operator (a ham) needs to have fluency in Morse code to be considered capable. Arguments boil down to:
Against: Morse code is obsolete, elitist, and unnatural
For: Morse code is international, succinct, and highly efficient in bandwidth usage, which makes it capable of better transmission and reception in difficult signal environments and bands. It can also be reliably decoded by automatic trunks and recorders.
But the debate is also silly because it's a question that didn't need to be asked. Obviously CW is suited for some purposes and not others.
 

Offline rstofer

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Re: Basic Soldering Lesson 1 - Old School
« Reply #24 on: May 19, 2017, 04:37:46 pm »
What is this soddering they speak of?
Do any English people exist who don't get smug about the North American pronunciation of "solder"?

I guess we have the same problem with aluminum vs aluminium
There are other examples...

What's with the 'u' in color?
 


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