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Can youtube STEM videos from universities replace higher learning?

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Beamin:
So my official job is go to the doctors take pain medicine and lie around in bed educating myself through youtube since I cant afford or physically am able to attend college due to my disabilities.

I saw a RBMK reactor simulator and tried playing with it(I posted the link to download on this forum, you try to make the disaster occur). Not only was it not fun but I couldn't make it work, I just wanted to make it melt down. So I found "openCourse" from MIT on nuclear physics. I got out a note book and watched fifty hours of class and googled sources to use as my text book. Now after about 50 hours of learning I still cant make the RBMK work, mainly because I dont remember the math, but at least I now know why its not working.

Shouldnt you be able to use this as "relevant experience" when looking for a technical job? The instructor asks the students questions and I can answer them even though the grad students are stumped. A fun example is the you have to eat,sit on, and throw out the window three radio active cookies, what should you do?

Beamin:
Answer: try to figure it out with an alpha beta and gamma source...

























You eat the gamma throw the beta out the window and sit on the alpha. Why? It should be obvious but the student count figure it out.

Rick Law:
There is a difference between being credentialed and being educated.

At college, you can get the credential (degree, etc) and may be educated (or not).  Taking courses on-line can for sure educate, but credential is harder to come by.  You have to figure out for yourself how you would get it.  The "how" would depend on where you are and what kind of credential you want:  Degree? Certification? Whatever...

If being credentialed is not important to you, on-line courses is an excellent way to learn.  Some real big draw backs that you have to solve:
1.  What to do if you have a question.
2.  Labs and hands-on, at college, there would be a properly equipped lab.
3.  On-line lacks a well defined curriculum.  For example, if you are getting a STEM degree College, you go from physics 100 level, to 200 level, math 100 level to 200 level... then the discipline-dependent course at higher levels.  If you are going for math, then of course it would be the 300 level and 400 level math.  So on, so on.  On-line, you can do it "out of order" and begun things that you have not yet learn the backgrounds for.  So that would make it so much harder.

If you are series about being educated, understand that issue.  Be ready to put aside what you are learning now and switch over to "boning up" certain things that you are weak on before switching back.  Best of course is to work out the proper pre-requisite courses and do those first so you don't need to switch back and forth.

Beamin:

--- Quote from: Rick Law on October 09, 2021, 05:23:39 pm ---There is a difference between being credentialed and being educated.

At college, you can get the credential (degree, etc) and may be educated (or not).  Taking courses on-line can for sure educate, but credential is harder to come by.  You have to figure out for yourself how you would get it.  The "how" would depend on where you are and what kind of credential you want:  Degree? Certification? Whatever...

If being credentialed is not important to you, on-line courses is an excellent way to learn.  Some real big draw backs that you have to solve:
1.  What to do if you have a question.
2.  Labs and hands-on, at college, there would be a properly equipped lab.
3.  On-line lacks a well defined curriculum.  For example, if you are getting a STEM degree College, you go from physics 100 level, to 200 level, math 100 level to 200 level... then the discipline-dependent course at higher levels.  If you are going for math, then of course it would be the 300 level and 400 level math.  So on, so on.  On-line, you can do it "out of order" and begun things that you have not yet learn the backgrounds for.  So that would make it so much harder.

If you are series about being educated, understand that issue.  Be ready to put aside what you are learning now and switch over to "boning up" certain things that you are weak on before switching back.  Best of course is to work out the proper pre-requisite courses and do those first so you don't need to switch back and forth.

--- End quote ---

Yeah I struggle with the math even though I made AP in high school I just dont remember it anymore.

Rick Law:
I know you said besides mobility, financial is also an issue.  Beside on-line stuff, there may be one more option.

If you can overcome the mobility issue, you should check with your local community college and see if they allow "sit-in", also known as "auditing the course" and perhaps by other names as well.  That is: merely you go to the class/lecture room as a non-student and just "sit-in" the room to listen to the lecture. You get to learn but no access to labs or TA help.  No one will grade your home work nor are you allowed to take exams.  This may also be USA college only.  At our near by state university, the univ itself appears to have no policy on that and left the decision to professors of the specific course in question.

That used to be a good way to learn, but may not be for now.  This virus thing would probably get in the way since many of the courses priorly in-person now is in remote because of the virus thing.  Stranger may not even be allowed into a building as many State owned/operated buildings (like the DMV) screens whoever enters.  Once things "get back to normal", you should consider this path.

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