Author Topic: Radio in other countries ->SDR-> internet> playback all 20MHZ?  (Read 1615 times)

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Offline Beamin

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I came up with this idea: The radio in America is awful commercials 1/3 of the time then they play the same songs over and over often repeating the same ones multiple times a day. But I like to hear the radio in other countries. Is there a way you could set up your SDR with the band width set to 20 MHz and pick up the whole FM band and send it over the internet and then you could listen to it from anywhere somehow tuning it like you could the SDR or setting up a SDR where users can set the frequency? I remember I found a site where you could tune their SDR over short wave really a cool site but I have lost it. 
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Offline Circlotron

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Re: Radio in other countries ->SDR-> internet> playback all 20MHZ?
« Reply #1 on: April 27, 2018, 01:04:08 pm »
Try this   http://websdr.org/
 
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Online ebastler

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Re: Radio in other countries ->SDR-> internet> playback all 20MHZ?
« Reply #2 on: April 27, 2018, 01:39:20 pm »
Why limit you choice to one country's FM stations? So many stations are streamed online already. Google "internet radio stations" for a list of portals and stations which should keep you busy for months... ;)
 
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Offline drussell

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Offline VK3DRB

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Re: Radio in other countries ->SDR-> internet> playback all 20MHZ?
« Reply #4 on: April 28, 2018, 01:35:21 pm »
Try this   http://websdr.org/

Wow!  This is awesome...  :)

Yeah its pretty cool. Makes one want to go out and buy an SDR, or better still something like this... http://www.icom.co.jp/world/support/download/brochure/pdf/IC-7300_USA.pdf

All the great classic short wave radio stations around world are pretty much gone. VoA is dead. Radio Australia is dead. Even the communist propaganda stations are dead. The great SW bands of 9.6MHz and 11.7Mhz are deathly quiet. Only a few religion stations remains, but even HCJB is in its death throws. This is price of progress. There is an old saying, don't put all your eggs in one basket. The one basket is the Internet. When it stops, there is no backup.

Despite ham radio dying out, there are plenty of ham radio stations can still be heard. Most of the operators are old men. It wasn't video that killed the radio star. It is the Internet. 

China has told the West they don't want their waste anymore and has banned waste imports. In effect, the communist Chinese have told the West to go and get stuffed. Australia was caught out and it is our government's own stupid fault. We have no infrastructure here to recycle most of our rubbish so most of it will end up in landfill. It will take years to get waste recycling up and running here. We had all our eggs in one basket with waste recycling and no backup plan, and so it is with the Internet. Another solar storm like the Carrington Event of 1859, it might be all over for all of us.

If you have a ham radio station, having solar panels, a battery backup and a Faraday cage around your shack is not a bad idea because if the Internet stops, hams might be the only link to the rest of the world. This happened when cyclone Tracey demolished Darwin on Christmas day 1974 - a ham in Melbourne was the only link to another ham in Darwin for several days.
 

Offline Richard Crowley

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Online ebastler

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Re: Radio in other countries ->SDR-> internet> playback all 20MHZ?
« Reply #6 on: April 28, 2018, 06:36:54 pm »
if the Internet stops, hams might be the only link to the rest of the world.

I am a ham myself. (Well, I hold a full license, but I don't operate.) But I think your statement is mainly wishful thinking by hams, along the lines of "one day, we will become relevant again". If the internet link should break in some region, despite redundant connections, satellite links will probably be more prevalent and more reliable than shortwave ham stations.

Ham radio is still a great hobby. In my mind, it is about deliberate minimalism and self-sufficiency, technical nostalgia, and about exploring new technologies. All of which are great and commendable motivations for a technical hobby. Why do hams see the need for a "one day we will save the world" justification?
 

Offline VK3DRB

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Re: Radio in other countries ->SDR-> internet> playback all 20MHZ?
« Reply #7 on: April 29, 2018, 02:57:03 am »
if the Internet stops, hams might be the only link to the rest of the world.

...If the internet link should break in some region, despite redundant connections, satellite links will probably be more prevalent and more reliable than shortwave ham stations...

Why do hams see the need for a "one day we will save the world" justification?

Satellites do not have anywhere near the bandwidth needed even to supply just commercial transactions on a mass scale. Besides, a Carrington Event will wipe out most of the world's satellites. Hams won't save the world, but any well designed mission-critical system should have a backup. The city of Warrnambool has no backup when their Telstra exchange went down in 2012. "No phones, no lights, no motor cars, not a single luxury." They could not even do banking or get petrol. The incident got global focus because it was a warning of what happens when there is no Internet.

 

Offline Beamin

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Re: Radio in other countries ->SDR-> internet> playback all 20MHZ?
« Reply #8 on: May 04, 2018, 09:07:44 pm »
Why limit you choice to one country's FM stations? So many stations are streamed online already. Google "internet radio stations" for a list of portals and stations which should keep you busy for months... ;)

Because I want to be able to scroll up and down the band and hear local commercials and weather and other things don't always play in international web cast. Plus that would require me finding the stations through google instead of just tuning the dial like a local would. I would also like to hear their interference to compare to other regions and sun spots.
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Offline Lord of nothing

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Re: Radio in other countries ->SDR-> internet> playback all 20MHZ?
« Reply #9 on: May 08, 2018, 09:15:46 pm »
Any in many Country its illegal.  >:D
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Offline Halcyon

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Re: Radio in other countries ->SDR-> internet> playback all 20MHZ?
« Reply #10 on: May 08, 2018, 11:32:21 pm »
Why limit you choice to one country's FM stations? So many stations are streamed online already. Google "internet radio stations" for a list of portals and stations which should keep you busy for months... ;)

Because I want to be able to scroll up and down the band and hear local commercials and weather and other things don't always play in international web cast. Plus that would require me finding the stations through google instead of just tuning the dial like a local would. I would also like to hear their interference to compare to other regions and sun spots.

You'll find more often than not, the web stream is a simulcast of the live, free-to-air channel, without any edits or alternate programming. This means you'll hear local ads, news, weather and traffic. The main reason is that many listeners might be outside of the broadcast area (or even travelling overseas), plus there are extra overheads involved for having an "internet only" broadcast crew employed at the station.

"Internet only" stations might be a different story, they might dynamically insert ads depending on where the listener is streaming from, but even then, most of the ones I listen to still play American commercials.

radio.net is a good website and there is also a smart phone application you can download (they dynamically insert ads at the beginning of the stream, but then revert back to the original stream). It seems to have the largest selection. If you have a Sonos or similar system, you can listen to radio.net channels without pre-roll ads.

Another is iHeartRADIO which seems to be predominately Australia and the USA.

In Australia, some of the most popular radio stations are actually still broadcast on the AM (medium wave) band (such as 2GB) but as you know, the quality of AM radio is pretty poor and very prone to interference, so many listeners stream the station even if they are within the broadcast area.
« Last Edit: May 08, 2018, 11:39:04 pm by Halcyon »
 

Offline Lord of nothing

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Re: Radio in other countries ->SDR-> internet> playback all 20MHZ?
« Reply #11 on: May 09, 2018, 09:42:00 am »
here some Shop Radio produced in Austria:
https://radiomax.at/on-air/

You can play around with other Station the are highly protected!  :-DD
http://listen.radiomax.technology/lagerhaus
with test/ test.  :popcorn:
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Online borjam

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Re: Radio in other countries ->SDR-> internet> playback all 20MHZ?
« Reply #12 on: May 09, 2018, 12:57:32 pm »
I am a ham myself. (Well, I hold a full license, but I don't operate.) But I think your statement is mainly wishful thinking by hams, along the lines of "one day, we will become relevant again". If the internet link should break in some region, despite redundant connections, satellite links will probably be more prevalent and more reliable than shortwave ham stations.

Ham radio is still a great hobby. In my mind, it is about deliberate minimalism and self-sufficiency, technical nostalgia, and about exploring new technologies. All of which are great and commendable motivations for a technical hobby. Why do hams see the need for a "one day we will save the world" justification?

In a real catastrophe (like the hurricanes hitting Puerto Rico and other Caribbean islands last year) ham radio operators have been really helpful as far as I know. It's not so easy to repair a complex infrastructure like mobile phone networks. And actually I wonder what might happen if emergency radio communications are migrated to LTE networks.

Are you sure that the staff of the telecommunications operators can really operate their equipment (especially set it up and perform emergency reconfigurations) without the assistance of the manufacturer? I really doubt it.

That said, in order to be *really* helpful in an emergency hams must abandon the "romantic" view of the Morse operator transmitting information. I would rather plan emergency wireless networks  that might allow hospitals and other critical services to have at least a basic email service.

And yes, I am a ham and I work for an ISP :)
 

Offline StuUK

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Re: Radio in other countries ->SDR-> internet> playback all 20MHZ?
« Reply #13 on: May 09, 2018, 02:41:58 pm »

Despite ham radio dying out, there are plenty of ham radio stations can still be heard. Most of the operators are old men. It wasn't video that killed the radio star. It is the Internet. 


Statistics released by UK telecommunications regulator Ofcom indicate that the Amateur Radio population in the UK has grown by approximately 10% over the past 5 years. As of the end of August 2017, there were 52,195 Full licensees, 9,739 Intermediate licensees, and 22,649 Foundation licensees.

Agree about the old men thing though  :-\
 

Offline @rt

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Re: Radio in other countries ->SDR-> internet> playback all 20MHZ?
« Reply #14 on: May 10, 2018, 02:23:20 am »
Amateur operators (here in Aus at least), train for ego rather than practical use.
I’ve never hear of a competition involving any form of organised relay at all.

 
 

Offline Lord of nothing

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Re: Radio in other countries ->SDR-> internet> playback all 20MHZ?
« Reply #15 on: May 10, 2018, 06:51:09 am »
Quote
That said, in order to be *really* helpful in an emergency hams must abandon the "romantic" view of the Morse operator transmitting information. I would rather plan emergency wireless networks  that might allow hospitals and other critical services to have at least a basic email service.
haha trust me here in Austria the Situation is worse. The hole Geriatric Club is work against independent Amateur Radio Operator and block the Freq for independent Repeater System.  :palm: There are much more problems thats why I refuse to make an Amateur Operator Licence!  :box:
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Online ebastler

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Re: Radio in other countries ->SDR-> internet> playback all 20MHZ?
« Reply #16 on: May 10, 2018, 05:51:01 pm »
haha trust me here in Austria the Situation is worse. The hole Geriatric Club is work against independent Amateur Radio Operator and block the Freq for independent Repeater System.  :palm: There are much more problems thats why I refuse to make an Amateur Operator Licence!  :box:

Not sure what you mean. By "independent amateur radio operator", do you mean a non-licensed one? I.e. are you complaining that the licensed amateurs are defending their frequency ranges against non-licensed cowboys?  ???
 

Offline Lord of nothing

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Re: Radio in other countries ->SDR-> internet> playback all 20MHZ?
« Reply #17 on: May 12, 2018, 09:48:53 am »
No quite all Repeater in AT are maintained by "the" Amateur Radio Club. The try everything that no one build there own Repeater Network who is not related to "the" Amateur Radio Club.
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Online borjam

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Re: Radio in other countries ->SDR-> internet> playback all 20MHZ?
« Reply #18 on: May 12, 2018, 01:31:54 pm »
Being an EU country it should be similar to Spain. Repeaters are lightly regulated, with the telecommunication authority supervising and approving or denying licenses.

They are known as collectively owned facilites, so they must belong to a radio club. Now, in Spain there is a large IARU member club (URE) and independent ones. There is no provision in law mandating ownership by any large IARU affiliated club though. So, no problem if you belong to a small club, no need for crazy graybeards. ;)

It’s not much of a trouble to get approval for a repeater unless you are installing it in a well covered area, but authorities will demand a consistent availability.
 

Offline Lord of nothing

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Re: Radio in other countries ->SDR-> internet> playback all 20MHZ?
« Reply #19 on: May 12, 2018, 01:51:08 pm »
There is just one (official) Radio Amateur Club thats it. You dont have to sign up there but the have the full power and know many officials. Let me say it so its common there in Austria. You can be with them and have a nice life or you are against it and life on the shadow side of the Mountain.
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