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Does current flow through a Battery?

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kevin original:
I recall Dave having a discussion about whether or not current flows through a capacitor because the electrons can't make it through the dielectric(unless you let the smoke escape). I've recently been looking into batteries and I've read that electrons do not pass through electrolyte solutions, which boggles my mind. We all know that adding salt of some form to water makes it conductive to electricity and "current flow" but if it is true that electrons do not journey across the electrolytic fluid and it is only the ions that travel between the electrodes then does current really flow through a battery? Perhaps electrons do travel through a battery just hitching a ride on the ion but when all of the ions "run out" the current flow stops. So it sounds to me like batteries are really just chemical capacitors.

IanB:

--- Quote from: kevin original on October 16, 2021, 03:25:06 am ---So it sounds to me like batteries are really just chemical capacitors.

--- End quote ---

There is a sense in which this is absolutely true  :)

bdunham7:

--- Quote from: kevin original on October 16, 2021, 03:25:06 am ---Perhaps electrons do travel through a battery just hitching a ride on the ion but when all of the ions "run out" the current flow stops.

--- End quote ---

That's pretty good simplified version of how an Li-ion battery works.


--- Quote ---So it sounds to me like batteries are really just chemical capacitors.

--- End quote ---

No, absolutely not.

bob91343:
Batteries have a lot in common with capacitors.  Ions and/or electrons are the means of charge transport in batteries.  In capacitors, it's the charge and discharge that 'imitates' current flow.

eti:
One wouldn't get very far if it didn't - put 4 "D" cells in a Maglite and the current HAS to flow through ALL of the cells.

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