Author Topic: Electronics people and football  (Read 2400 times)

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Online Nusa

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Re: Electronics people and football
« Reply #25 on: April 06, 2020, 07:20:32 pm »
I played soccer in high school, well enough to make the school team as a defender. Of course, this was before computer games, and I didn't find pin-ball that addictive, although it had its moments. Fixing them was more fun than playing them.

Can't say I actively paid attention to sports after that, although I understand them well enough to talk the talk when it's useful.

 

Offline m98

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Re: Electronics people and football
« Reply #26 on: April 06, 2020, 08:09:51 pm »
I am also completely disinterested in watching other people doing sport, and couldn't care less about specific teams.
I was also never really good at any ball games, so that's not something I've done since high school.

My team sport is gliding. Probably one of the most diverse sports there is, both mentally and physically challenging. I don't like the competitions, flying stressed out in a collision minefield isn't my definition of fun. But dancing in the sky with a few club mates, colleagues you meet on the way or birds who decided to be part of your flock for a few minutes really is beautiful.

I also really like cycling, both as my main method to get around, and to get some exercise while enjoying scenic views at the same time.
« Last Edit: April 06, 2020, 08:11:56 pm by m98 »
 

Offline pcmad

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Re: Electronics people and football
« Reply #27 on: April 07, 2020, 12:40:10 am »
what is foot ball  thats a new one on me

Offline james_s

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Re: Electronics people and football
« Reply #28 on: April 07, 2020, 04:40:37 am »
FYI, in EU the game with the round ball is called football, not soccer.

AFAIK mostly (if not only) in the USA the game with the round ball is called soccer, to distinguish it from what USA normally calls football (the game with the pointy ball  :D ) while EU is calling that "American Football", or if it's played in EU, then the game with the pointy ball is called Rugby by the EU people.

Not a sports big fan in general, and not a fan of football in special, so while I'm pretty sure it's how I wrote above, I might as well be completely off with the naming.   ;D

No that's right. The boring game with the pointy ball is called Football, it's very popular. The slightly less boring game with the round ball you kick around is called Soccer, it's fairly popular to play but professional soccer is not one of the big sports.
 

Online Nusa

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Re: Electronics people and football
« Reply #29 on: April 07, 2020, 04:49:09 am »
FYI, in EU the game with the round ball is called football, not soccer.

AFAIK mostly (if not only) in the USA the game with the round ball is called soccer, to distinguish it from what USA normally calls football (the game with the pointy ball  :D ) while EU is calling that "American Football", or if it's played in EU, then the game with the pointy ball is called Rugby by the EU people.

Not a sports big fan in general, and not a fan of football in special, so while I'm pretty sure it's how I wrote above, I might as well be completely off with the naming.   ;D

No that's right. The boring game with the pointy ball is called Football, it's very popular. The slightly less boring game with the round ball you kick around is called Soccer, it's fairly popular to play but professional soccer is not one of the big sports.

What he said. However, American Football and Rugby have significant differences and really aren't the same game. Even the regulation balls are different...the Rugby one is fatter and less pointy. You can google if you want to know more.
 

Offline JPortici

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Re: Electronics people and football
« Reply #30 on: April 07, 2020, 06:09:57 am »
Also rugby doesn't require that ridiculous suit of armor (maybe a helmet). REAL game for REAL men :D
 

Offline vis1-0n

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Re: Electronics people and football
« Reply #31 on: April 07, 2020, 06:45:38 am »
I much prefer the beauty of cricket (could watch a bunch of 6 or 60 year olds playing) and rugby (refereeing the play from my armchair is a great pleasure, with all the rules and fast action refereeing is a game itself) - and I despise football (soccer). Yet I can't bring myself to watch either of my favourites at the top level anymore. I do the same for some of my favourite TV series or movie sequels - I have not completed them, I often go back to the pilot and start over.

I do follow EPL and CL football intensely though, and occasionally binge through the complete series of Friends no matter how much I despise both. As for Baseball, Basketball and The Big Bang Theory, it is just revulsion.
 

Online Circlotron

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Re: Electronics people and football
« Reply #32 on: April 07, 2020, 07:18:08 am »
Also rugby doesn't require that ridiculous suit of armor (maybe a helmet). REAL game for REAL men :D
Rugby? Those guys can’t even score a goal without falling flat on their faces!
I think I’m talking about the right game...
 

Offline Electro Detective

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Re: Electronics people and football
« Reply #33 on: April 07, 2020, 11:06:33 am »

Seriously now, do extreme sports nuts, armchair 'my team' idiots, and parents that drive their frightened kids into the ground to 'achieve'
seem like their grey/gray kit upstairs is fully assembled and booting properly?  :palm:

These are animals you don't want to be friends with nor related to,
much less stuck with in a life or death situation, where only compromise and cooperation will determine if some or all survive

i.e. MOST of these pack animal nutters are a no go,
but at least on the big sports days we know where they all are,
safely caged in a stadium far away from the rest of us for a few hours   :phew:

Unfortunately there's no escape from the Monday sports jibberish,  ::)

but luckily for us, multitasking Corona has come to the rescue as a Monday saviour   :clap:

Update: multitasking Corona is nuking all sports jibberish 24/7  :-+
and everything else  :o


 
 
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Offline vk6zgo

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Re: Electronics people and football
« Reply #34 on: April 07, 2020, 11:50:10 am »
One benefit of the 'Social Distancing' thing is they won't be able to play for a while now    :clap:

so less endurance drugs taken to survive head on collisions, racing for a ball filled with air,

less fights at nightclubs and maccas when the endurance drug/booze mix messes with their head,
and perhaps less chance of banging their mates GF/wife by mistake or coerced whilst totally sh!tfaced  :=\ 

no more traffic drama on the weekends  :horse:

and no more gum flapping on Mondays about the Fing game !
and like I should give a rats soiled tail which of the two -INTERSTATE- teams was the victor.
I might care if it were local VFL or VFA or even Junior League teams in Victoria, but interstate? fts 
What levels of moronity are these no lifers?  ???

They should 'get out and fix something' or play the game themselves
and or get involved with a real world local club that has a social vibe going as well,
preferably a club lacking 'sore loser' members

Whatever it takes to get these armchair footy idiots out of our hearing range on Mondays!  :phew:

I should have guessed you are from Victoria!
 
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Offline vk6zgo

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Re: Electronics people and football
« Reply #35 on: April 07, 2020, 11:59:04 am »
In this thread : "we are better than them".


::)

Yes this is definitely the "expressing feelings of superiority"thread.
 

Offline vk6zgo

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Re: Electronics people and football
« Reply #36 on: April 07, 2020, 12:50:57 pm »
I have noticed that in all the electronics workplaces I have worked in over the decades (computing, telecoms, satellites, medical, automotive etc), I have come across almost no electronics engineers or technicians who have a passion for football (Aussie Rules Football in Australia, or Soccer in Europe, or "Football" in the USA), or certainly do not carry on about it on a Monday morning after the weekend games. Many electronics workplaces struggle to get people interested in footy tipping competitions. A lot of engineers here were born overseas, but even amongst the Aussies born and bred here few show much interest. This is in contrast to the general population, many of which here are fanatical and treat it like a religion. People from all socioeconomic classes are into football, except us it seems.

Why is it so?

My experience has been different .

I have memories of sitting in the lunchroom at work & listening to multiple Techs rabbit on about "footy".
At the time, I had well & truly drifted away from interest in the game, but others were keenly interested.
And they weren't morons, either, their technical abilities were excellent.

When I was a kid, I was no good at sports, but my Dad, & I, (&  sometimes the rest of the family) would often go to the old WANFL (Australian Rules) games, following East Perth.

At the time, that competition was "semi-professional", so the blokes on the teams had "day jobs".
Many of the East Perth players were Dad's workmates.

As I got older, I drifted away from interest in "footy", & found other things to do on weekends---like working!

When my kids were young, they wanted to go to the "footy", & the basketball, so I took them & enjoyed the games as much as in the old days.

Over time, we became supporters of The Fremantle Dockers in Australian Rules Football, the Perth Wildcats
in Basketball, & the Perth Glory in Soccer/Football/"the world game"

In all those games, the fans just wanted to have a good time, & drunkeness & violence was conspicuous by its absence.
OK, it must have happened, but for the footy, for instance, out of 40,000 plus people in a stadium, the number of people involved would have been in single figures.
40,000 people is a bit more than the population of Geraldton (WA), & I bet you'll see more "aggro" in "Gero" any Saturday night.

As I said, I've never been any good at sport------I can't play the violin, the Saxophone, the Bagpipes, or the Banjo either, but I can enjoy listening to them played by someone who can.

Similarly, I can enjoy watching someone "who can" play a sport.

Maybe the lack of Sports fans among Electronics folk you have noticed is because Electronics is no longer a mainstream occupation, & has become more of a niche--- the domain of geeks.

Various people have derided football fans getting all worked up about their teams.
This comes from a forum where people "foam at the mouth" about Oscilloscopes!
 

Offline Electro Detective

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Re: Electronics people and football
« Reply #37 on: April 07, 2020, 11:22:48 pm »

Sports is supposed to be about friendly social based competition and good cheer afterwards,
regardless of who won, or who 'came second'.
Well, it was pretty much so, even in the big smoke, once..

AFAICT it's become a looney fanaticism,
barracking and supporting suspected (and caught) drug cheats
playing perhaps/maybe rigged games, depending on how the betting sits amongst the big punters and bookies, via numerous rumors  :-//

Supporting interstate teams against ones local teams should be classed as 'Sporting Treason'  :rant:
and if caught and sentenced, offenders serve their time as weekend house detention  :popcorn:

and fwiw, if there are extreme  "foam at the mouth" about Oscilloscopes!" members here  ??? 
I'd rather follow their play, and catch something I can use with my oscilloscope/s

 ;D


 

Offline BrianHG

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Re: Electronics people and football
« Reply #38 on: April 08, 2020, 12:55:20 am »
In my younger years, I didn't mind actually playing/competing in sports.  In fact I usually enjoyed it except boring baseball...

However, I never once enjoyed watching professional sports other than occasional Olympic games and more recently Tour De France grade cycling.
__________
BrianHG.
 

Offline xmo

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Re: Electronics people and football
« Reply #39 on: April 08, 2020, 03:33:09 am »
I never played, but it's fun to watch:
« Last Edit: April 08, 2020, 03:40:03 am by xmo »
 

Offline CatalinaWOW

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Re: Electronics people and football
« Reply #40 on: April 08, 2020, 05:18:29 am »
A few comments from someone who played sports at a semi-pro level as a young man, but is long past those times.

1.  All the comments about a sport (or sports) being boring are really a reflection on the commenter.  Soccer is boring if you don't know what is going on.  Same thing for American football.  And afaik for all other sports.  I've never watched enough cricket (or played at all) to understand what is going on, and I do find it boring.  But clearly those who do understand enjoy it a lot.  I enjoy watching American football, Canadian footfall, rugby and soccer.  Haven't seen much Australian rules football and thus don't understand it well, but can see how once I learned it, it would be enjoyable.

2.  I learned a long time ago that it wasn't good for me to get very involved watching any sport.  Because sooner or later "your" team loses.  And the emotional downer (again, for me) was nearly as big as when I was playing myself.  And something I had no control over.  Wasn't worth it.  I suspect I am not alone in this, at least among rational groups like those on this forum.

3.  Workplace involvement in sports is largely related to how consuming the work is.  Sports doesn't seem big in most medical settings.  Many engineering jobs are fully consuming.  Where I have seen sports take hold in engineering environments there have been no proximate deadlines,  repetitive (even boring) tasks and other factors that made outstanding distractions attractive.
 

Offline james_s

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Re: Electronics people and football
« Reply #41 on: April 08, 2020, 06:09:01 am »
I know what's going on in football, I know how to play it, I've enjoyed football video games now and then, but watching sports just does not interest me. It's no different than the fact that most people would find engineering boring, it's just not their thing. I just generally don't like passively watching other people do something, it doesn't engage me. With pro sports especially I have no connection with the players, they're not my friends, I've never met them, they wouldn't know who I was if they met me. How can I get excited over what they're doing?
 
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Offline Electro Detective

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Re: Electronics people and football
« Reply #42 on: April 08, 2020, 06:52:38 am »

I never played, but it's fun to watch:

(Attachment Link)

Awesome rig mate  :clap:  but you're enjoying it in private and or with good company  :)

two thumbs up  :-+ :-+  because I don't have to hear about it on Monday/s   :scared: 
or be nominated for an Academy Award pretending to listen and care  :o

 ;D



 
« Last Edit: April 08, 2020, 06:58:52 am by Electro Detective »
 

Offline vk6zgo

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Re: Electronics people and football
« Reply #43 on: April 08, 2020, 09:07:57 am »

Sports is supposed to be about friendly social based competition and good cheer afterwards,
regardless of who won, or who 'came second'.
Well, it was pretty much so, even in the big smoke, once..

AFAICT it's become a looney fanaticism,
barracking and supporting suspected (and caught) drug cheats
playing perhaps/maybe rigged games, depending on how the betting sits amongst the big punters and bookies, via numerous rumors  :-//

Supporting interstate teams against ones local teams should be classed as 'Sporting Treason'  :rant:
and if caught and sentenced, offenders serve their time as weekend house detention  :popcorn:

and fwiw, if there are extreme  "foam at the mouth" about Oscilloscopes!" members here  ??? 
I'd rather follow their play, and catch something I can use with my oscilloscope/s

 ;D

The problem with AFL & NRL are that they are both extended State competitions.

The old VFL, for instance, had a lot of "cross town" rivals, who were very passionate about their little patch of Melbourne, & let's face it, Melbourne was seriously boring  back in the day, so it gave them something to be passionate about.

When the AFL was formed, all the old suburban clubs were "grandfathered" into it, with all their followers.
The WAFL didn't get to do that, & new clubs especially for the AFL were formed.

The sorta got Port Adelaide into the comp, but the connection between the original club & the AFL is tenuous.

In WA, the crosstown rivalry between the Dockers & Eagles is intense, & the Umpires are abused by both sides in a Derby, but supporters of both teams travel by train to & from the game, mix at the stadium, all quite amiably.
The same thing happens  with  supporters of the Perth Glory & the Interstate teams they play.

I wonder if this is because they don't have a century or so of history, but I never noticed any "aggro" with the WAFL, either.

Re "sporting traitors".

Before the advent of the AFL, the VFL games were shown on TV in WA, & many people picked a team to follow.
This continued, & you still have Hawthorn, Essendon, & so on, followed by some in this State.

People don't live forever in one State, so someone from Sydney, now in Melbourne, may have worked in WA, been introduced to both the AFL & the "A League" in that city, & so follows the Eagles & the Perth Glory, whilst in the NRL still staying loyal to the "Rabbitohs".

Even people who have never left Melbourne may follow interstate clubs.

What do you do if you were a Fitzroy supporter?
Change allegiance to one of the other teams you have opposed for years, or stay with the Lions, even if they've moved across the country?


Re Vomit. & disgusting toilets
Plenty  of spilt drinks, dropped pies & other crud, but vomit was notable for its absence.

I have been to many games at the venerable Subiaco Oval, & yes, the "Dunnies" were old, & crowded, but
"disgusting"?
I have been around the traps for a long time, & have seen disgusting toilets, but these were not them!

I honestly can't see the harm in sports fans, & if they only give you the opportunity to feel superior, they have surely achieved something!

 

Offline Electro Detective

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Re: Electronics people and football
« Reply #44 on: April 08, 2020, 10:20:34 am »

Great that you've copped a better sports experience overall,

but I'm sticking to what I know commented previously, based on what I have seen too many times

FYI Melbourne was never boring back in the days of real footy by normal un-enhanced tattoo free blokes
and the local VFL and VFA games were interesting while they were locally based   

fwiw we knew most of the players and or knew someone that knew them or related to them, or played footy with them at school, and so forth etc
so 'supporting' a team back then meant something, and kept us off the dog eat dog streets longer  >:D

Once the big moneytards threw cash at the clubs to make or break them and or shift them interstate, it was game over for me,
it became just another 'product' laced with idolistic BS 

Defend the current crop of sports fans if you will, but rest assured most of them have screws loose, fanatical and dangerous if it doesn't go there way,
look at the neanderthal behavior in other countries.
Would aussies be any different once their country and society degrades the same way?
 

Offline vk6zgo

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Re: Electronics people and football
« Reply #45 on: April 08, 2020, 11:56:35 am »
A few comments from someone who played sports at a semi-pro level as a young man, but is long past those times.

1.  All the comments about a sport (or sports) being boring are really a reflection on the commenter.  Soccer is boring if you don't know what is going on.  Same thing for American football.  And afaik for all other sports.  I've never watched enough cricket (or played at all) to understand what is going on, and I do find it boring.  But clearly those who do understand enjoy it a lot.  I enjoy watching American football, Canadian footfall, rugby and soccer.  Haven't seen much Australian rules football and thus don't understand it well, but can see how once I learned it, it would be enjoyable.

2.  I learned a long time ago that it wasn't good for me to get very involved watching any sport.  Because sooner or later "your" team loses.  And the emotional downer (again, for me) was nearly as big as when I was playing myself.  And something I had no control over.  Wasn't worth it.  I suspect I am not alone in this, at least among rational groups like those on this forum.

3.  Workplace involvement in sports is largely related to how consuming the work is.  Sports doesn't seem big in most medical settings.  Many engineering jobs are fully consuming.  Where I have seen sports take hold in engineering environments there have been no proximate deadlines,  repetitive (even boring) tasks and other factors that made outstanding distractions attractive.

Again, my experience differed.

The guys I referred to as "rabbiting on" about football were in a Broadcast Service Centre, where at a "moment's notice" they could be called on to travel hundreds of km across the State, & work all night to restore service at a broadcast  site in some remote country town, so I would say they had "deadlines"!

No,I think it is more to do with having a "critical mass" of staff.
These same football enthusiasts didn't regale their offsider with "footy" stuff  when they went away on call, & sports enthusiasm was much less in the other places where I worked, which had much smaller numbers.
 

Offline Psi

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Re: Electronics people and football
« Reply #46 on: April 08, 2020, 12:09:41 pm »
Ball sports, especially contact sports, are viewed by a large percentage of engineers as a waste of time.

It's kind of like..
"If advanced aliens every visit earth and see lots of humans running around aimlessly kicking a ball back and forth they are going to think we're morons."

You can kick a ball back and forth in your personal time, or you can be like "Thought Emporium" and mess around with DIY gene therapy in your home lab.
« Last Edit: April 08, 2020, 12:16:36 pm by Psi »
Greek letter 'Psi' (not Pounds per Square Inch)
 

Offline Sal Ammoniac

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Re: Electronics people and football
« Reply #47 on: April 08, 2020, 07:23:52 pm »
I've never cared for football in any of its guises (American football, soccer, rugby).

But how about Rollerball? Now there's a sport I'd watch.

Complexity is the number-one enemy of high-quality code.
 

Online Circlotron

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Re: Electronics people and football
« Reply #48 on: April 08, 2020, 10:58:22 pm »
^^ Saw that in the cinema back in the day, 1975 I think. All the guys at school were totally raving about it. Went and saw it by myself. Walked out halfway. First and only time.
Quote
Rollerball was conceived not only to satisfy man's bloodlust, but to demonstrate the futility of individualism.
Quote
the entire point of the movie was to show the "sickness and insanity of contact sports and their allure."[12]
Quotations from Wikipedia article.
« Last Edit: April 08, 2020, 11:07:27 pm by Circlotron »
 

Offline unknownparticle

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Re: Electronics people and football
« Reply #49 on: April 09, 2020, 01:14:08 pm »
Football is amongst the most overated forms of activity on Earth, and I loathe it.  Aside from electronics, my other passions are motorsports, motorcycles and anything with a turbo engine, actually, anything with an engine! 
DC coupling is the devils work!!
 


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