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favourite technical books

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TomKatt:
While not reference materials per se, I learned quite a bit about digital circuits from Steve Ciarcia's 'Circuit Cellar' articles in BYTE Magazine...   I eventually bought the book compilation and built my first Persistence of Vision project in the late 80's.  His projects were a great foundation for the microcontroller boom that came years later with the PIC and AVR.

In the same vain, Don Lancaster's TTL Cookbook (+ CMOS Cookbook) were great resources for learning digital circuits.  Still have those buried somewhere.

EddieLane:

--- Quote from: Neomys Sapiens on February 09, 2023, 03:16:10 am ---Slightly over 1000 tomes in print and around 24xx as Ebooks (excluding appnotes, FMs, TMs etc.) and all listed (including the appnotes, FMs, TMs etc.).
 :phew:
But several GB and also several stacks of copied paper remain to process.
 :scared:

Just some highlights which have helped me much:

- the complete, 6-volume set of the Telefunken Laborbuch Series
- Handbuch der Elektronik, T. Adamowicz et.al., Franzis 1979 (much on RF topics)
- of course, the big Nuehrmann (Werkbuch der Elektronik)
- Sylvia Goldsmith, Real-Time Systems Development
- On SW topics also Knuths 'Basic Algorithms' and the masive 'Software Engineers' Reference Book'
- Tool Engineers Handbook,McGraw-Hill 1959
- Mechanisms and mechanical devices sourcebook, Sclater/Chironis
- Schaltungsaufgaben in der fernschreib- und Signaltechnik, Siemens (magnetic counters, logic and dividers!)
- the excellect Thiemig series on nuclear instrumentation
- and much much more on pulse power techniques, EMI/EMC/EW, SRMQ, Aerospace electronics, electromechanics

For RF and EW topics, always look out for the stuff from Artech House (UK). And several of the IET-published works are also indespensable.

I already saw that several of you keep the Electronics' engineers handbook (Fink/Christiansen) on their shelves - this was one of the first expensive books which I got (I was around 16). It is excellent - an no pirated scan or OCR seems to exist! And it's great that now we can find so many books and other sources on the internet, and some of them are free. I have to read and write a lot so informational sources are beneficial for me. Some time ago, I was writing one paper, and this page provided me with free essay examples on management, which helped me with a paper for my extra course. And it saves me so much time and effort. Several company-published technical pocketbooks are also real pearls.Like the 'Teldix Taschenbuch der Navigation' or the 'SEL pocketbook'. Always be on the lookout for such!
Maybe I can sometime later give another few examples of outstanding works.

--- End quote ---

And which of this book you'd recommend to read first of all?

Smokey:

--- Quote from: EddieLane on February 22, 2023, 02:09:25 pm ---
--- Quote from: Neomys Sapiens on February 09, 2023, 03:16:10 am ---Slightly over 1000 tomes in print and around 24xx as Ebooks (excluding appnotes, FMs, TMs etc.) and all listed (including the appnotes, FMs, TMs etc.).
 :phew:
But several GB and also several stacks of copied paper remain to process.
 :scared:

Just some highlights which have helped me much:

- the complete, 6-volume set of the Telefunken Laborbuch Series
- Handbuch der Elektronik, T. Adamowicz et.al., Franzis 1979 (much on RF topics)
- of course, the big Nuehrmann (Werkbuch der Elektronik)
- Sylvia Goldsmith, Real-Time Systems Development
- On SW topics also Knuths 'Basic Algorithms' and the masive 'Software Engineers' Reference Book'
- Tool Engineers Handbook,McGraw-Hill 1959
- Mechanisms and mechanical devices sourcebook, Sclater/Chironis
- Schaltungsaufgaben in der fernschreib- und Signaltechnik, Siemens (magnetic counters, logic and dividers!)
- the excellect Thiemig series on nuclear instrumentation
- and much much more on pulse power techniques, EMI/EMC/EW, SRMQ, Aerospace electronics, electromechanics

For RF and EW topics, always look out for the stuff from Artech House (UK). And several of the IET-published works are also indespensable.

I already saw that several of you keep the Electronics' engineers handbook (Fink/Christiansen) on their shelves - this was one of the first expensive books which I got (I was around 16). It is excellent - an no pirated scan or OCR seems to exist! Several company-published technical pocketbooks are also real pearls.Like the 'Teldix Taschenbuch der Navigation' or the 'SEL pocketbook'. Always be on the lookout for such!
Maybe I can sometime later give another few examples of outstanding works.

--- End quote ---

And which of this book you'd recommend to read first of all?

--- End quote ---

Better learn german!

I have "Mechanisms and mechanical devices sourcebook".  I like this one for it's "fun" value.  Its like a picture book for mechanically curious adults.  Often times a brain twister as you try to figure out how a mechanism works from a single line drawing.

Benta:

--- Quote from: Smokey on February 22, 2023, 11:03:52 pm ---Better learn german!

I have "Mechanisms and mechanical devices sourcebook".  I like this one for it's "fun" value.  Its like a picture book for mechanically curious adults.  Often times a brain twister as you try to figure out how a mechanism works from a single line drawing.

--- End quote ---
Yes, there's a wealth of books in German (I'm in the fortunate position of being able to read both English and German), but certainly also in Spanish, Italian, French, Russian etc. where I lack the linguistic skills.
The book you mention sounds a bit like "Rube Goldberg", I hope it isn't.  :)
But we all love real books. Great!

Smokey:
Amazon has a preview.  https://www.amazon.com/Mechanisms-Mechanical-Devices-Sourcebook-5th/dp/0071704426

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