Author Topic: Fresh Graduate salary  (Read 11983 times)

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Offline mttee2

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Fresh Graduate salary
« on: February 23, 2010, 01:43:45 pm »
  This may sound a bit silly.  ;D ;D
  Recently, I check out with my senior friend about his job at overseas. He is earning 5000USD per month. I am surprised as engineers here only earns RM5000(1429USD) per month.  ???
   I am still studying my bachelor degree in Electrical & Electronics. I am just curious what is the average salary offer in your country? Secondly, anyone knows where I can search for working environment info such as stability of job, living expenses, and taxation in other countries? TQ ;)
 

Offline rossmoffett

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Re: Fresh Graduate salary
« Reply #1 on: February 23, 2010, 08:01:31 pm »
In the USA, anywhere from $45k to $75k a year, depending on geography, speciality and expertise.  This is for a Bachelor degree.
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Online EEVblog

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Re: Fresh Graduate salary
« Reply #2 on: February 23, 2010, 09:10:36 pm »
In Australia it's anywhere from roughly AU$40K to say AU$60K per year. (US$35 to US$55K)
But it really does vary a lot, there is no rhyme or reason to it.
Sadly you often don't get much more with experience. e.g. I know guys with decades of experience getting under AU$80K
For electronics designs roles in Australia you are lucky to get over AU$100K at any level.
There is more money in programming, management, or sales.

Dave.
 

Offline Emyr

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Re: Fresh Graduate salary
« Reply #3 on: February 24, 2010, 10:52:52 am »
Bear in mind that you can't simply use currency exchange rates to compare salaries due to costs of living differences.

Chinese wages are low, but a 660ml beer costs GBP0.28 over there  ;D
 

Offline mttee2

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Re: Fresh Graduate salary
« Reply #4 on: February 25, 2010, 08:00:08 am »
In Australia it's anywhere from roughly AU$40K to say AU$60K per year. (US$35 to US$55K)
But it really does vary a lot, there is no rhyme or reason to it.
Sadly you often don't get much more with experience. e.g. I know guys with decades of experience getting under AU$80K
For electronics designs roles in Australia you are lucky to get over AU$100K at any level.
There is more money in programming, management, or sales.

Dave.

True. I may earn like a typical person in overseas but the exchange rate will means a lot for my parents back home. At least I can relieve their burden or probably clear some of their bank's debt. I just need to spent wisely. ;D
 

Online EEVblog

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Re: Fresh Graduate salary
« Reply #5 on: February 25, 2010, 10:31:37 am »
True. I may earn like a typical person in overseas but the exchange rate will means a lot for my parents back home. At least I can relieve their burden or probably clear some of their bank's debt. I just need to spent wisely. ;D

That would mean no women and no beer!

Dave.
 

Offline mttee2

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Re: Fresh Graduate salary
« Reply #6 on: February 25, 2010, 03:15:37 pm »

That would mean no women and no beer!

Dave.

Yeah. You are right.   :-\
 

Offline rossmoffett

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Re: Fresh Graduate salary
« Reply #7 on: February 25, 2010, 11:18:39 pm »
I'm looking for a job in Los Angeles right now, and when I was searching around for some HR numbers I found a website that allows you to post your salary and view everyone elses.  Check it out!  Pay particular attention to companies that produce things you want to work on.
ArcAttack - A group of musical Tesla coil performers with semi-regular blog updates.
 

Offline Veramacor

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Re: Fresh Graduate salary
« Reply #8 on: February 26, 2010, 06:40:48 pm »
Hey Dave,

What's the preferred brew in Sydney these days?


Over here in Michigan our favorite beer ...

"the next one"
 

Online EEVblog

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Re: Fresh Graduate salary
« Reply #9 on: February 27, 2010, 03:25:24 am »
What's the preferred brew in Sydney these days?

No idea, I actually don't drink alcohol (inc wine), tea, or coffee!
Yes, I'm a freak and social outcast of the highest order... that might explain the blog...

I do know that those alcoholic softdrinks ("alco-pops") and light beer are call "poofter drinks"!

Dave.
 

Offline VK3DRB

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Re: Fresh Graduate salary
« Reply #10 on: February 28, 2010, 04:26:56 am »
Admittedly, salaries for experienced electronics engineers in Australia are low compare to civil and mining engineers. I have found it is financially the best to take on other senior responsibilities as your career progresses such as team leadership and even project management, but making sure I never give up the core work what I love doing. I am a Principal engineer of a global electronic equipment company, but still much of my time is architecture of technical solutions, writing code and developing circuitry because getting things working is what I have enjoyed the most professionally and privately for over 30 years.

My suggestion to anyone is first of all put what you love doing first and foremost. One volunteer is worth ten conscripts. Someone who has passion for electronics or code is worth ten people who, for example, get engineering degrees because of cultural or family expectations or money and plod their way through. I have seen many of the latter in more recent times, and these days real enthusiasts are getting harder to find. The "volunteer" will do electronics at home and continue to have a thirst for learning. The "conscript" will have no interest unless it makes money.

A good engineer is worth his salt and a smart company will pay him a higher salary in order to retain his skills and passion. Success mean being happiest. The high salary becomes an effect rather than a cause.

Dave, I have never had a cup of coffee in my life, literally. Strange thing I was among two adult acquaintances in their 40's recently and both of them has also have never had a cup of coffee in their lives. The probability of that would be pretty low in Australia.
« Last Edit: February 28, 2010, 04:29:11 am by VK3DRB »
 

Offline mttee2

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Re: Fresh Graduate salary
« Reply #11 on: February 28, 2010, 11:08:42 am »
Admittedly, salaries for experienced electronics engineers in Australia are low compare to civil and mining engineers. I have found it is financially the best to take on other senior responsibilities as your career progresses such as team leadership and even project management, but making sure I never give up the core work what I love doing. I am a Principal engineer of a global electronic equipment company, but still much of my time is architecture of technical solutions, writing code and developing circuitry because getting things working is what I have enjoyed the most professionally and privately for over 30 years.

My suggestion to anyone is first of all put what you love doing first and foremost. One volunteer is worth ten conscripts. Someone who has passion for electronics or code is worth ten people who, for example, get engineering degrees because of cultural or family expectations or money and plod their way through. I have seen many of the latter in more recent times, and these days real enthusiasts are getting harder to find. The "volunteer" will do electronics at home and continue to have a thirst for learning. The "conscript" will have no interest unless it makes money.

A good engineer is worth his salt and a smart company will pay him a higher salary in order to retain his skills and passion. Success mean being happiest. The high salary becomes an effect rather than a cause.

Dave, I have never had a cup of coffee in my life, literally. Strange thing I was among two adult acquaintances in their 40's recently and both of them has also have never had a cup of coffee in their lives. The probability of that would be pretty low in Australia.

Very true. When I apply for a job, I will take note of this point. Passion is something lacking in my country.

  I am interested in this field but money is a restricting factor. My family's income is below average. I rely on campus equipment to learn. I also read application notes, datasheets, troubleshoot some of my father's company machinery, and search the web to learn more. I find it troublesome but still feel some joy learning it.

  Probably I should start buying mini packet of electronic project from the shop to learn more.  ;D
 

Offline rossmoffett

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Re: Fresh Graduate salary
« Reply #12 on: February 28, 2010, 05:43:52 pm »
  Probably I should start buying mini packet of electronic project from the shop to learn more.  ;D

If you want to save money and learn at the same time, probably the cheapest way is to get stuff people are tossing out and retrieve the parts from those things.  You can re-purpose lots of stuff, look up the datasheets for all of the ICs in whatever you're taking apart and save what you want.  I used to even salvage resistors and capacitors when I was a teenager, for lack of money.  You'll learn a lot about how stuff works and get free parts at the same time.
ArcAttack - A group of musical Tesla coil performers with semi-regular blog updates.
 


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