Author Topic: Need help identifying a part  (Read 2849 times)

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Offline dmlandrum

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Need help identifying a part
« on: February 17, 2011, 05:37:17 am »
My Jameco grab bag has this weird part in it that I missed before. Anyone know what it is? It looks like there are two flat-faced electrodes with a gap between them.

Sorry the picture is crap, but my camera doesn't have a macro mode, so it's the best I could do.
Darren Landrum
 

Offline mkissin

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Re: Need help identifying a part
« Reply #1 on: February 17, 2011, 08:06:28 am »
It looks like it might be a spark gap, but I've never seen one with a glass (?) enclosure before.
 

Offline Psi

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Re: Need help identifying a part
« Reply #2 on: February 17, 2011, 08:23:42 am »
yeah, i'm going to go with sparkgap as well.
Maybe it's a type that requires the user be able to see if it's conducting?

The only other thing i can think of is some sort of neon.
Greek letter 'Psi' (not Pounds per Square Inch)
 

Offline JohnS_AZ

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Re: Need help identifying a part
« Reply #3 on: February 17, 2011, 04:14:33 pm »
I think the proper term is "gas tube surge arrester" but yeah, it's a spark gap.
I'm either at my bench, here, or on PokerStars.
 

Offline Time

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Re: Need help identifying a part
« Reply #4 on: February 17, 2011, 05:11:43 pm »
Its common to have spark gaps housed in transparent materials when there are multiple gaps that need to be fired as close to the same time as possible.  By having the gaps all lined up and "viewing" each other the radiation from the initial gap will promote the breakdown in the next switch over causing the jitter between the switches to be reduced. 

I doubt thats what this was use for though.  Just looks like a plain ol' surge arrestor.
-Time
 

Offline Polossatik

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Re: Need help identifying a part
« Reply #5 on: February 17, 2011, 05:11:59 pm »
Does it Blend?
Real Circuit design time in minutes= (2 + Nscopes) Testim + (40 +120 Kbrewski) Nfriends

Testim = estimated time in minutes Nscopes= number of oscilloscopes present Kbrewski = linear approx of the nonlinear beer effect Nfriends = number of circuit design friends present
 

Offline Sionyn

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Re: Need help identifying a part
« Reply #6 on: February 17, 2011, 06:47:13 pm »
spark gap

seen huge ones (well bigger than that)
used in power switching
eecs guy
 

Offline lowimpedance

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Re: Need help identifying a part
« Reply #7 on: February 17, 2011, 10:45:40 pm »
It is indeed a gas surge arrestor, and if you look on one of the end caps you will see a voltage rating at which the arrestor should start to 'spark over' during a transient.
cheers
John
The odd multimeter or 2 or 3 or 4...or........can't remember !.
 

Offline dmlandrum

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Re: Need help identifying a part
« Reply #8 on: February 18, 2011, 12:57:20 am »
Great, thank you, everyone! Now I need to figure out some creative way to use it. ;)

Can I use it as a hysteresis device, like a neon tube?

EDIT: Err, neon bulb, rather?
« Last Edit: February 18, 2011, 01:00:07 am by dmlandrum »
Darren Landrum
 

Offline DJPhil

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Re: Need help identifying a part
« Reply #9 on: February 18, 2011, 12:58:40 am »
That'd be really useful for a ham antenna lightning arrestor.

Does it Blend?
Indeed!
 


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