Author Topic: How car telematics helped catch a murderer  (Read 2385 times)

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Online shakalnokturn

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Re: How car telematics helped catch a murderer
« Reply #50 on: February 27, 2020, 12:26:35 pm »
cell phone companies store the same info all the time and give it to law enforcement when (properly) requested.
cell phone data has been used as evidence in many cases, and so has a suspects phone conveniently being off the
time of a crime


Now that's the way to death sentence criminals easily.
Not too far off: "You weren't watching soap opera or Armageddon news on TV after work, so you must have been murdering somebody."
 

Offline Lord of nothing

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Re: How car telematics helped catch a murderer
« Reply #51 on: February 29, 2020, 04:18:18 pm »
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It's funny though, i didn't receive a GDPR consent form :P (from the mfg. However i did give consent, to the insurance company for the black box i installed)
since not you as person get tracked just the Car who can used by anyone you give the Key to. So maybe there is no GDPR required (yet).
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Any sane and free society shouldn't even think of that.
Since a Company and not the Gov is colleting this Data you might life in a "free" society.
Beside of them every Country who make a Business with Saudi Arabia who someone get executed for Witchcraft isnt better.  :clap:
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we are different right?
The US spy on Merkels Phone just for there own Safety to know that not the Russian spy on her.  :-DD
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And I doubt this kind of systematic data collection from cars' vendors is allowed in the EU. Does anyone know more about this?
There is a law that all new Produced Cars since this Year or new Year MUST have a (e)Simcard inside!
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Buy an old car.
Well in Europe you can get screwed with that idea.
Why? For example in Germany Cards requierd an Inspection and when the Car emit to much Particls, Co2 or what ever the get a Yellow or Red Sticker and are not permit to enter many City's any more.  :=\
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Wrap the cars antennae in tin foil
Sure when you are ready to disassembly your Car.
Hopefully the Antenna not got potted!
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and sattelite radio
We dont have in Europe.
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I'm surprised that there is not more hacking done of these modules.
Well do you want brick your 60.000€ Car?
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Offline JPortici

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Re: How car telematics helped catch a murderer
« Reply #52 on: March 02, 2020, 06:52:35 am »
There is a law that all new Produced Cars since this Year or new Year MUST have a (e)Simcard inside!

source? i hadn't heard about this yet
 

Offline Mr. Scram

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Offline G7PSK

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Re: How car telematics helped catch a murderer
« Reply #54 on: March 02, 2020, 07:48:20 am »
source? i hadn't heard about this yet
https://europa.eu/youreurope/citizens/travel/security-and-emergencies/emergency-assistance-vehicles-ecall/index_en.htm
I had a new vauxhall last year with the ecall system bloody thing I only kept it six months it was so bad. The steering would pull to the right all the time it went back to the dealer for alignment and pulled hard to the left so back it went and it pulled to the right again there was obviously a warp in body. Anyway went out one night and reached up to turn the cabin light on guess which button I hit, the emergency call one of course as they were side by side and close together. The Mitsubishi truck I have also has the system but no manual button to hit by mistake it only works if the air bags deploy which is far more sensible.
 


Offline Lord of nothing

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Re: How car telematics helped catch a murderer
« Reply #56 on: March 02, 2020, 10:26:46 am »
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112 calls can be made without a SIM card.
Not in  Germany.
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Offline Gromitt

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Re: How car telematics helped catch a murderer
« Reply #57 on: March 02, 2020, 12:03:38 pm »
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112 calls can be made without a SIM card.
Not in  Germany.

Are you quite sure about that, it has bin the law ever since the first mobile phone.
 

Offline Lord of nothing

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Re: How car telematics helped catch a murderer
« Reply #58 on: March 02, 2020, 12:11:59 pm »
Yes the did it because the had so much Fake, Prank calls.  :palm:
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Offline I wanted a rude username

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Re: How car telematics helped catch a murderer
« Reply #59 on: March 03, 2020, 12:41:10 am »
Calling 000/112 without a SIM was also disabled in Australia about a decade ago for a few months in 2008. Stated reasons included people wasting the call centre's time by calling it to test if a second hand phone they wanted to buy was working!
« Last Edit: March 03, 2020, 09:09:29 am by I wanted a rude username »
 

Offline Someone

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Re: How car telematics helped catch a murderer
« Reply #60 on: March 03, 2020, 08:44:21 am »
Calling 000/112 without a SIM was also disabled in Australia about a decade ago. Stated reasons included people wasting the call centre's time by calling it to test if a second hand phone they wanted to buy was working!
Really? Not sure the states can make that sort of decision:
https://www.triplezero.gov.au/Pages/Usingotheremergencynumbers.aspx
https://www.legislation.gov.au/Details/F2019L01509 (Telecommunications (Emergency Call Service) Determination 2019)
 
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Offline I wanted a rude username

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Re: How car telematics helped catch a murderer
« Reply #61 on: March 03, 2020, 09:08:24 am »
It wasn't the states calling the shots, it was ACMA ... as it should be. However:

> In late April 2008, mobile phone carriers advised ACMA that their testing had identified a scenario where a genuine emergency call from a phone with a working SIM could be blocked.

So they first delayed its implementation, then revoked it.

I didn't get that memo till now, so thanks for pointing this out. It does indeed seem that phones without SIMs can call emergency services in Australia.
 

Offline Halcyon

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Re: How car telematics helped catch a murderer
« Reply #62 on: March 03, 2020, 10:21:15 am »
E000 calls from SIM-less mobiles has been a thing here for a while. In relation to testing 000/112 services, there is a test procedure which service providers follow (it basically involves calling the actual 000 number and repeating a specific "test message" to the operator).

If the volume of test calls is expected to be high, there is a specific person/department within Telstra who you will need approval from prior to conducting those tests on a larger scale. They will advise the appropriate time for the test to occur and notify the various emergency call centres ahead of time.

Also to keep in mind, when you call 000/112 in Australia, you are connected to a Telstra operator first, not an emergency service. Then depending on the state, suburb and service requested, they will divert you to the appropriate agency to handle the call. That can be anyone from state Police, Fire Brigade or Ambulance to volunteer organisations such as the Rural Fire Service, Volunteer Rescue Association etc...

If there is no verbal response from the caller, it is forwarded to the Police as what is known as a "Five five call". The reason for the raised dimple on the "5" key on almost every phone with actual buttons is that you can press that twice (or if requested by the operator, respond to questions using only that key) and you don't need to see or look at the keypad to do it. Examples for this might be someone who partially incapacitated, cannot speak (either due to the nature of emergency, a medical condition or if they are under duress), visually impaired or some other reason which prevents someone from answering questions verbally but still requires an emergency response. Your location is determined by the subscriber details and/or for mobile phones, this is done via "Push MoLI" or even using the GPS in your handset in some cases.

SIM-less emergency calls are more important than ever these days since a large majority of the population is using VoIP services as their landlines (and this number is only increasing with the adoption of NBN connections). VoIP services aren't guaranteed to connect you to emergency services as even a mis-configuration would prevent you from doing so. Back in the day of POTS services, even if you had no dial-tone (due to a suspended service), you could still call 000.


« Last Edit: March 03, 2020, 10:31:33 am by Halcyon »
 
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Offline I wanted a rude username

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Re: How car telematics helped catch a murderer
« Reply #63 on: March 03, 2020, 11:06:57 am »
Back in the day of POTS services, even if you had no dial-tone (due to a suspended service), you could still call 000.

Didn't know that, but it doesn't surprise me. Taking emergency calls seriously is a constant in the telephony industry. The lengths that the GSM designers went to, such as actively kicking off non-emergency calls if the cell was full, are astonishing.

Also, apparently 911 now works in Australia (at least from mobiles ... can't see how it'd work from a land line unless the exchange uses a timeout). Must try that next time I have a less urgent emergency.  ;D
 

Offline Halcyon

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Re: How car telematics helped catch a murderer
« Reply #64 on: March 04, 2020, 08:53:47 am »
The lengths that the GSM designers went to, such as actively kicking off non-emergency calls if the cell was full, are astonishing.

Yep, not just for emergency calls though but every SIM card has a "service class" value assigned to it. In times of congestion or during major events or incidents, Telco's can prioritise traffic to certain service classes (or even disallow entire classes completely).

We use "higher class" SIMs in Government so when a cell is congested, we can still use voice and data. Likewise if there is a major incident (like a terrorist attack for example), cell services can be reserved only for emergency services (although I'm yet to see that happen in Australia, we got close one time).
 
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Offline TheUnnamedNewbie

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Re: How car telematics helped catch a murderer
« Reply #65 on: March 05, 2020, 04:16:01 pm »
Back in the day of POTS services, even if you had no dial-tone (due to a suspended service), you could still call 000.

Didn't know that, but it doesn't surprise me. Taking emergency calls seriously is a constant in the telephony industry. The lengths that the GSM designers went to, such as actively kicking off non-emergency calls if the cell was full, are astonishing.

Also, apparently 911 now works in Australia (at least from mobiles ... can't see how it'd work from a land line unless the exchange uses a timeout). Must try that next time I have a less urgent emergency.  ;D

I was told at some point modern standards/phones don't actually 'dial' 911 or 112 or 100 or 999 or whatever. They simply recognize it as 'emergency', and then use a channel/identifier as defined in the standard (so independent of where you are) to connect to emergency services.


If there is no verbal response from the caller, it is forwarded to the Police as what is known as a "Five five call". The reason for the raised dimple on the "5" key on almost every phone with actual buttons is that you can press that twice (or if requested by the operator, respond to questions using only that key) and you don't need to see or look at the keypad to do it.


I though the reason for the dimple is simply as home key (similar to F and J on most computer keyboard layouts) so you can orient yourself on the keyboard in the dark. I imagine the 5 being used for emergency is a result of that, and not the reason for it.

The best part about magic is when it stops being magic and becomes science instead
 


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