Author Topic: How do you store your resistors  (Read 18648 times)

0 Members and 2 Guests are viewing this topic.

Offline Bryan

  • Frequent Contributor
  • **
  • Posts: 587
  • Country: ca
How do you store your resistors
« on: October 21, 2016, 10:10:45 am »
I am sure all of us have bought those 1/4 watt resistor assortment kits but was curious as to how others are storing them so they are easy to find. Rather not buy those plastic storage cabinets that are used for screws, nuts etc., too much bench space.

Have seen smaller ones, but one would have to fold up the leads. Was thinking of just some 2" x 3" coin paper envelopes and keeping the individual resistors in the envelopes and keep the whole works in a plastic index card box.

https://youtu.be/_oehSyxSyGY

Any other suggestions.
« Last Edit: October 21, 2016, 10:12:33 am by Bryan »
-=Bryan=-
 

Offline setq

  • Frequent Contributor
  • **
  • Posts: 444
  • Country: gb
Re: How do you store your resistors
« Reply #1 on: October 21, 2016, 10:50:02 am »
Mine are all in a big box, loose but rolled up on tapes. I can read them on sight and think in colours so I just scratch around for a few seconds and grab the right one out. Loose ones left are just chucked in the bin.

I buy 100 of each value usually. In 20 years I've only run out of a few 10 and 22 decade values. If I'm missing a value I just buy 100 of them on demand from CPC here in the UK.
 

Offline ataradov

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 6698
  • Country: us
    • Personal site
Re: How do you store your resistors
« Reply #2 on: October 21, 2016, 04:29:52 pm »
Big binder with baseball card collectors inserts.
Alex
 
The following users thanked this post: jancumps

Offline jonovid

  • Frequent Contributor
  • **
  • Posts: 873
  • Country: au
    • JONOVID
Re: How do you store your resistors
« Reply #3 on: October 21, 2016, 05:28:52 pm »
Quote
I am sure all of us have bought those 1/4 watt resistor assortment kits but was curious as to how others are storing them so they are easy to find. Rather not buy those plastic storage cabinets that are used for screws, nuts etc., too much bench space.

Have seen smaller ones, but one would have to fold up the leads. Was thinking of just some 2" x 3" coin paper envelopes and keeping the individual resistors in the envelopes and keep the whole works in a plastic index card box.
  I use a transparent plastic storage tub for all my zip-lock bags with the same thing. as for used resistors from a temporary breadboard test circuit, Now out of the resistor ribbon or roll of resistor tape. I use a transparent ziplock bag with both used resistors and the roll of resistors in the same bag of the same value  \$\Omega\$  :-+ . desolder'd components are keep'd separate.  its True IMO plastic storage cabinets use too much bench space and do not work for me.  :rant:
« Last Edit: October 21, 2016, 05:36:38 pm by jonovid »
Hobbyist with a basic knowledge of electronics
 

Offline Cubdriver

  • Supporter
  • ****
  • Posts: 2943
  • Country: us
  • Nixie addict
    • Photos of electronic gear
Re: How do you store your resistors
« Reply #4 on: October 21, 2016, 06:00:57 pm »
I keep 'em in a cardboard box!   :P



Seriously, I by and large keep them in drawers in storage cabinets or compartmented boxes.  My parts storage leaves a lot to be desired as far as consolidation goes. 

(That box of old CC resistors is one I got from a friend in CA - he'd purchased it many years ago in a lot of surplus stuff from a decommissioned department at some tech company.  Apparently someone went through and simply dumped all the resistors they had in a big box.  It'll take a lot of sorting to straighten them all out, and I'll have to test them to see how far out of spec the may be, but if they're any good I should be set of life as far as 5% carbon composition resistors go.  Shame they couldn't have been 1 or 2% metal film ones...)

-Pat
If it jams, force it.  If it breaks, you needed a new one anyway...
 

Offline Legionary

  • Contributor
  • Posts: 10
  • Country: us
Re: How do you store your resistors
« Reply #5 on: October 21, 2016, 06:44:41 pm »
I am sure all of us have bought those 1/4 watt resistor assortment kits but was curious as to how others are storing them so they are easy to find. Rather not buy those plastic storage cabinets that are used for screws, nuts etc., too much bench space.

Have seen smaller ones, but one would have to fold up the leads. Was thinking of just some 2" x 3" coin paper envelopes and keeping the individual resistors in the envelopes and keep the whole works in a plastic index card box.

https://youtu.be/_oehSyxSyGY

Any other suggestions.

As a user of those giant plastic storage cabinets, and currently looking at building shelving so I can reclaim bench space, I find this idea fascinating.

Won't be nearly as convenient, but would take up much less space as most of the little bins I have are maybe 80-90% empty.
 

Online rdl

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 3072
  • Country: us
Re: How do you store your resistors
« Reply #6 on: October 21, 2016, 07:40:33 pm »
Not that I have that many resistors, but they used to be a tangled up pile in a small plastic tub.


 

Offline Bryan

  • Frequent Contributor
  • **
  • Posts: 587
  • Country: ca
Re: How do you store your resistors
« Reply #7 on: October 21, 2016, 07:45:04 pm »
Not that I have that many resistors, but they used to be a tangled up pile in a small plastic tub.




Where did you get those cylindrical holders, or what are they called. One could label the top of them and really maximize space by stacking them vertically.
-=Bryan=-
 

Offline Delta

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 1225
  • Country: gb
Re: How do you store your resistors
« Reply #8 on: October 21, 2016, 07:47:27 pm »
In a big pile on the bench...
 

Offline ataradov

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 6698
  • Country: us
    • Personal site
Re: How do you store your resistors
« Reply #9 on: October 21, 2016, 08:41:18 pm »
Where did you get those cylindrical holders, or what are they called. One could label the top of them and really maximize space by stacking them vertically.
Yes, the name of them, please.

There are real cheap plastic test tubes like this http://www.ebay.com/itm/Best-10-X-Clear-Plastic-Test-Tubes-with-Caps-Stoppers-12x100mm-/182312291879?hash=item2a72a8ce27 , but they are long and taper towards the end, which will probably make them awkward for this application.

Actually, it appears they are also sold in 75 mm variety, which would be perfect - http://www.ebay.com/itm/10PCS-Clear-Plastic-Test-Tubes-with-Green-Caps-Stoppers-12x75mm-/322208167651?hash=item4b051a76e3
Alex
 

Offline rob77

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 1848
  • Country: sk
Re: How do you store your resistors
« Reply #10 on: October 21, 2016, 09:06:17 pm »
taking up just 6 drawers in a organizer box ;)


and you can quickly find the value you need while they're not taking up too much drawers ;)
« Last Edit: October 21, 2016, 09:08:00 pm by rob77 »
 

Online rdl

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 3072
  • Country: us
Re: How do you store your resistors
« Reply #11 on: October 21, 2016, 09:16:35 pm »
I got those tubes on ebay. They were called "bead storage tubes" and were listed as a crafting item. Something like these, except I didn't buy a hundred of them and I paid about double the price (per tube).

http://www.ebay.com/itm/100-Clear-Plastic-Tubes-W-Hang-Caps-Container-Storage-Seed-Beads-Jewelry-Crafts-/281101470810
 

Offline daybyter

  • Frequent Contributor
  • **
  • Posts: 396
  • Country: de
Re: How do you store your resistors
« Reply #12 on: October 21, 2016, 09:53:25 pm »
Just a small cardboard box with regular letter envelopes. I also have a second box for capacitors.
 

Offline tautech

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 19113
  • Country: nz
  • Taupaki Technologies Ltd. NZ Siglent Distributor
    • Taupaki Technologies Ltd.
Re: How do you store your resistors
« Reply #13 on: October 21, 2016, 10:18:56 pm »
I got these trays years ago from a estate sale with contents  :) , there are 5 in all and the 1 \$\Omega\$-9.1 \$\Omega\$ compartments double up for 10 \$\Omega\$ to 100 \$\Omega\$ also has M \$\Omega\$ values up to 10 and doubles up for 10 M \$\Omega\$ +
Only the top tray is that busy and they just stack nicely on each other.  :)

100 \$\Omega\$ to 910 \$\Omega\$ tray:


Oh yeah. measurements: 10" x 14"x 2" high. Stack of 5 is ~8" tall.
« Last Edit: October 21, 2016, 10:23:05 pm by tautech »
Avid Rabid Hobbyist
 

Offline Muttley Snickers

  • Supporter
  • ****
  • Posts: 2111
  • Country: au
Re: How do you store your resistors
« Reply #14 on: October 21, 2016, 10:46:08 pm »
I've always toyed with the idea of using CD storage racks for an alternate purpose, they are generally readily available around at our local council recycle centre in a variety of forms for next to nothing and cheap to buy new anyway, I have dozens of them here along with hundreds of empty CD cases that really should be put to better use. 
 

Offline David Hess

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 11662
  • Country: us
  • DavidH
Re: How do you store your resistors
« Reply #15 on: October 22, 2016, 12:07:01 am »
I use the wide drawer Akro Mills cabinets which allow three different values to be stored left to right without bending the leads in each drawer.
 

Offline Rerouter

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 4640
  • Country: au
  • Question Everything... Except This Statement
Re: How do you store your resistors
« Reply #16 on: October 22, 2016, 12:51:04 am »
Organiser trays here,
Last i checked i have something like 2000 of each E24 value, (Inherited), along with enough silicon that i could make a life size model of myself out of the dies alone,

Its kinda taken up an entire shed
 

Offline David Hess

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 11662
  • Country: us
  • DavidH
Re: How do you store your resistors
« Reply #17 on: October 22, 2016, 01:01:55 am »
But my question is are they going to build up static charges and zap the boards or components? They aren't claimed to be ESD safe but how would you test them? What precautions. if any, should you take. I checked the FAQ but evidently they don't get asked this question frequently.

They're still very useful even if static sensitive things shouldn't be stored in them.

I cut squares of black anti-static foam to place in the bottom of the compartments when ESD sensitive components will be stored.
 

Offline zapta

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 6004
  • Country: us
Re: How do you store your resistors
« Reply #18 on: October 22, 2016, 03:47:31 am »
Image search provides a few ideas https://www.google.com/search?q=resistor+storage&source=lnms&tbm=isch

I keep my PTH resistors in small plastic bags, trying to have no more than 10 unique values for quick experimentation.

Most of my passives are SMDs and they come in compact binders like this one. If I need to use them on a solderless breadboard i solder them to two small pieces of wires.

Drain the swamp.
 

Offline Smokey

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 1629
  • Country: us
Re: How do you store your resistors
« Reply #19 on: October 22, 2016, 03:50:55 am »
I have one of those cut tape binder kits for 0402 and 0805.  Really good for rework type jobs and playing around.  It's amazing what you can get on ebay direct from China.
Through hole stuff is in plain old mailing envelopes.  All the used envelopes with resistors in them are marked then put back in the box they came in.  Easy.  Only thing that sucks is when I put an envelope back out of order.
 

Offline hans

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 1087
  • Country: nl
Re: How do you store your resistors
« Reply #20 on: October 22, 2016, 08:22:56 am »
I have TH E12 series resistors in an organizer drawer.
If I would do it again I would sort them into bags in 1 small box. I don't really like organizer drawers after using them for a while. They are a pain to transport and take up wall space. I rather put shelves on walls rather than organizer drawers.
But that other time probably won't come, as I use only SMT now.

For SMT I bought one of those 0402 resistor kits from Ebay for like 18$ at the time, just like illustrated above by zapta.

This is by far the most convenient option. After all I find sorting parts like series of resistors and capacitors to be very tedious and annoying.
The rest of my parts are in these small boxes:

http://www.ebay.com/itm/5-color-50pcs-Kit-Components-Boxes-Laboratory-Storage-Box-SMT-SMD-Kits-26-33-22-/161104118886?var=&hash=item0
Not really sure how antistatic they are. But I keep small SMT parts in them anyway.

Just add a label printer and you can probably fit a complete E48 assortment of 0402 or 0603 resistors/ceramic caps, plus 100 IC's/small connectors into a travel bag.
 

Online Ian.M

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 9043
Re: How do you store your resistors
« Reply #21 on: October 22, 2016, 08:45:18 am »
I've recently sorted a couple of E12 leaded resistor kits into a 13 compartment organiser box, grouped by the two prefix digits.  Each bandoleer tape is labelled and the decades sorted in order within each compartment.  I've got the 13th (quad size) compartment free for odds&sods, or overstock of any E12 value.

I've done the organiser draws on a wall before and it is too much of a waste of wallspace.  I've also done individual storage tubes (for micro 1/8W leaded resistors) and that's also a PITA as all you see is a field of tube caps, so you label each one, then almost invariably two or more caps get swapped and you spend 10 minutes putting the right cap back on the right tube, or the tube you want isn't there, and you have to chase round to see who's forgotten to return it.

One organisation I was involved with had wall mounted bins for stores, one bin per item but didn't have extra bins for non-E12 values.  They just put them in the closest E12 bin.  Unfortunately that meant that a requisition for 20 1K resistors and 20 1K2 resistor would be met by a variable mix of 1K, 1.1K and 1.2K resistors totalling 40.   ::)  Use extra draws/compartments/folder pocket sheets for non-standard values and don't try to sort them with whichever E series you stock.  ;)
« Last Edit: October 22, 2016, 09:01:03 am by Ian.M »
 

Offline RoGeorge

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 2483
  • Country: ro
Re: How do you store your resistors
« Reply #22 on: October 22, 2016, 08:52:39 am »
This is what I was using in the last 30 years, too: sealed letter envelopes cut in half.



So far, it was the best way to store various TH components in small quantities.
Very easy and fast access to parts, small space footprint, very cheap and very easy to make, zero maintenance.

Actually, none of the expensive organizers I have can beat the DIY ones.

These ones, also the most expensive ones, are the worst: drawers are hard to open, the material is not fully transparent and you need to open 100 drawers to search for parts, dust can easily enter into closed drawers, the parts jumps out of drawers if transported by car, and so on. A total fail, but an expensive one: what's in the picture costs a couple of hundred USD. Half of them are still in their original sealed plastic foil. The other half is sparsely populated with very rare accessed parts, rare like once in a year or less.



On the orange cap is embossed "TOOD". Stay away from them.

Some of my other DIY organizers:
https://hackaday.io/project/6261-new-a-free-lab-organizer

Offline Bryan

  • Frequent Contributor
  • **
  • Posts: 587
  • Country: ca
Re: How do you store your resistors
« Reply #23 on: October 22, 2016, 09:09:41 am »
I am thinking now just using coin envelopes and storing them in those old school business card holders. The envelopes should fit in the plastic sleeves
-=Bryan=-
 

Online Ian.M

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 9043
Re: How do you store your resistors
« Reply #24 on: October 22, 2016, 09:24:56 am »
No.  The business card organiser wont shut nicely once more than about 1/4 its pages are filled, because parts in an envelope/sleeve are significantly thicker than a business card.  You need individual organiser pocket sheets in a lever arch file, (preferably in a box case so it doesn't get crushed) to allow enough expansion at the spine.
 
The following users thanked this post: Bryan


Share me

Digg  Facebook  SlashDot  Delicious  Technorati  Twitter  Google  Yahoo
Smf