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Junction from lengthy wire

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bdunham7:

--- Quote from: Sarvesaa on August 10, 2022, 03:26:32 am ---I am a begineer in electrical stuff and I am only 17.
I want to know whether my way of junctioning is proper. Please give your advices on it.

--- End quote ---

What you are doing there would be almost workable if you properly soldered and taped it and the wires were clamped in place.  But it isn't a very good solution and I'd really recommend that you just get a power strip instead. 

https://www.amazon.in/GM-Modular-3060-Book-Multicolour/dp/B008XT42JU/ref=sr_1_3?crid=2IDEMNKK6J6U6&keywords=power+strip&qid=1660235690&sprefix=power+strip%2Caps%2C273&sr=8-3

themadhippy:
some of these

and a wago221 box,job done

bdunham7:

--- Quote from: ebastler on August 11, 2022, 04:28:02 pm ---I can't find an "official" source right now. But the first answers (by John E Wulff and Ken Wallewein) in this thread describe cautions against soldered mains connections which I have heard/read before:

https://www.quora.com/Why-is-soldering-not-allowed-or-common-for-home-wiring

--- End quote ---

I've been using "unapproved" soldered connections, both repair and installation, for automotive and other applications for decades and have had zero failures.

Soldering used to the be approved method in the US for mains junctions and I think the main reason for abandoning that was simply speed and cost.  I don't think the failure rate was any higher than the non-zero failure rate of twisted and screw-clamped connections.  As for those replies, the first seems to be intermediate technobabble to me--yes you can screw up a solder connection, but that doesn't mean that they are inherently faulty.  And for the second, yes you will get fatigue failures if you have a lot of flexing going on anywhere in the region that the solder has wicked up the wire.  But that is totally avoidable with proper strain relief--which is usually required by either code or common sense in any case.

pardo-bsso:

--- Quote from: ebastler on August 11, 2022, 04:28:02 pm ---I can't find an "official" source right now. But the first answers (by John E Wulff and Ken Wallewein) in this thread describe cautions against soldered mains connections which I have heard/read before:

https://www.quora.com/Why-is-soldering-not-allowed-or-common-for-home-wiring

--- End quote ---

Alright, skipping the babble some of them make more sense in an environment subject to vibration or movements.

However, I've been soldering the fixed wiring in houses and local installations (say, in junction boxes) and that so far is trouble free since the last eight years or so. (to give more context, getting proper quality ferrules and associated terminal blocks or the like that would last is both hard and expensive)

Thanks for the link

Someone:

--- Quote from: pardo-bsso on August 11, 2022, 04:17:12 pm ---
--- Quote from: ebastler on August 11, 2022, 06:31:13 am ---But there are other things wrong with your connection. You cannot simply twist the wires together for mains power, nor should you solder them -- both methods are unsafe.
--- End quote ---
As far as I know the local code here for residential installations does not mention solder as forbidden nor allowed.
Why is that a risk?
--- End quote ---
Australian Standards are relatively good on this with a little bit of background/motivation included:
conductivity through joint =< cable conductivity
creep/stress
failure temperature

... and explicitly allow solder joints should they be of suitable design/quality.

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