Author Topic: Keysight handheld meters pro's and con's?  (Read 2767 times)

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Offline Terry01

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Keysight handheld meters pro's and con's?
« on: August 31, 2018, 03:06:28 pm »
I'm thinking about picking up 1 of Keysight's handheld meters but know absolutely nothing about the Keysight range. I know what Fluke suits what job, same with Brymen.
I was just looking for some pro's and con's on the different handheld meters they sell. I was just really looking at them because I have never had 1 and would like to own 1.
Any help will be much appreciated!
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Online Mr. Scram

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Re: Keysight handheld meters pro's and con's?
« Reply #1 on: August 31, 2018, 03:10:18 pm »
Are you buying new? The 1272A has had some issues in the past and a fair few units with the flaws are still in circulation. It's still a perfectly usable and safe device with the flaws, though.
 

Offline Terry01

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Re: Keysight handheld meters pro's and con's?
« Reply #2 on: August 31, 2018, 03:25:19 pm »
Yes i'd be looking for new. I know the Keysight meters are quite feature rich and they get a good name but that's about as much as I know. I think I would like to own one of them.
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Offline nctnico

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Re: Keysight handheld meters pro's and con's?
« Reply #3 on: August 31, 2018, 07:10:51 pm »
I bought a Keysight U1241B a couple of years ago. I think price/features/performance was probably better compared to Fluke.
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Offline eliocor

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Re: Keysight handheld meters pro's and con's?
« Reply #4 on: August 31, 2018, 09:08:55 pm »
I own 2x U1272A and 2x U1282A: not cheap but they work really well!
I prefer the U1272A model because it is smaller and it has as an accessory its protection bag.  The U1282A is rather big!
« Last Edit: August 31, 2018, 09:11:11 pm by eliocor »
 

Offline Terry01

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Re: Keysight handheld meters pro's and con's?
« Reply #5 on: August 31, 2018, 11:42:59 pm »
I've had a look at the meters recommended here and I think more research is required. I like both the U1272A & U1282A so will look more into those 2 for starters!
I did look at the U1242A but it's only 10k right? I will be pairing it up with my 289 ""if"" I do end up getting 1 of the 2 mentioned.
I'll probably have a Brymen 867s and a Fluke 177 going up for sale too if I get a new Keysight. I'm making it a new bench rule at my bench "not to pile up test equipment"! 

We'll see though!  :palm:
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Offline VK5RC

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Re: Keysight handheld meters pro's and con's?
« Reply #6 on: September 01, 2018, 01:25:49 am »
While there has been some concerns about longevity and reliability in daylight I like my u1253b for the readability — viewing angle and contrast superb - usually by the time I am actually reading the hh dmm stuff is everywhere . It is an old design, the newer HPAKS eg u1282 are really big, I quite like the Hioki DT4282, not too big.
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Offline bitseeker

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Re: Keysight handheld meters pro's and con's?
« Reply #7 on: September 01, 2018, 05:16:21 am »
I currently have the models shown below and will list some of the interesting or different features. Check the docs for details, of course. I really like the fast sampling/update rates of their meters. All three will work with the same USB or Bluetooth remote logging interfaces. They all have excellent, evenly lit backlights.

U1252B: LCD display. Dual 50,000 counts. Auto hold. Built-in data logging. Low-frequency square wave generator (0.5 – 4800 Hz) with adjustable duty cycle. Powered by rechargeable 9V Ni-MH battery (8.4V nominal, 30 hr. runtime, 2 hr. recharge) with built-in charge controller. Continuity test can be slow, but manually setting it to a high range makes it much faster. Large case, but not excessively so, with slightly convex sides. Mine had a bad charge controller and Keysight replaced the DMM with a new one.

U1272A: LCD display. Dual 33,000 counts. Auto hold. Built-in data logging. Has low impedance ACV/DCV mode for eliminating ghost voltages. Can compensate for DC offset voltages when measuring resistance. Also has a diode checker that tests in both directions so you don't have to swap the leads. Uses AAA batteries (300 hours). Almost identical in size to the U1252B, but its concave sides make it feel slimmer in the hand (better for those with smaller hands). Earlier versions, like mine, were sensitive to high-frequency RF on the input jacks that could alter the displayed value.

U1282A: This is like an upgraded/enhanced U1252B. LCD Display. Dual 66,000 counts. IP67 rated. Auto hold. Low-frequency square wave generator (0.5 – 4800 Hz) with adjustable duty cycle. Built-in data logging. Measures % of 4 – 20 mA or 0 – 20 mA for industrial current loop transmitter output. Non-contact AC voltage detection. Remote hold (optional probe required). Includes the USB logging interface cable. Uses AA batteries (800 hours). Large case, longer than the U1252B and U1272A plus additional protective protrusions (i.e., it's a big DMM and heavier than the other two).

For me, the U1252B is a great all-around DMM. For electronics, it retains full resolution to 5V whereas the U1272A drops a decimal place above approximately 3V. The signal generator is also handy for checking out used equipment at auction houses (e.g., frequency counters, oscilloscopes, and the like; however, it'd be nice if it went up to a few MHz).

The U1272A's LoZ mode is nice for electrical work. The diode tester is convenient for electronics. I haven't taken advantage of the auto DC offset compensation in resistance mode, but it's a neat idea.

The U1282A's NCV function is a nice addition and the rest being like the U1252B would make this my go-to meter, but its size and weight make it less handy to take around. So, it lives most of its life as a bench DMM.
« Last Edit: September 02, 2018, 03:01:31 am by bitseeker »
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Offline Synthtech

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Re: Keysight handheld meters pro's and con's?
« Reply #8 on: September 01, 2018, 09:59:18 am »
The thing that I really don’t like about my U1282A is the mushy rotary switch.
 

Offline Terry01

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Re: Keysight handheld meters pro's and con's?
« Reply #9 on: September 01, 2018, 12:10:41 pm »
The thing that I really don’t like about my U1282A is the mushy rotary switch.

Somewhere else I was searching for info on these meters said the same thing as you about the "mushy" switch!
My 289 has the nicest rotary switch i've used yet. I can't even explain why, it just feels good and proper! I get all the things people moan about with the 289 but i love mine. I want another meter that "just feels right" the same as my 289 then i'll be happy.
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Offline Terry01

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Re: Keysight handheld meters pro's and con's?
« Reply #10 on: September 01, 2018, 09:03:04 pm »
Anyone have or know of the U1273A?

Been eying this model up!  :-\
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Online Mr. Scram

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Re: Keysight handheld meters pro's and con's?
« Reply #11 on: September 01, 2018, 11:15:08 pm »
Anyone have or know of the U1273A?

Been eying this model up!  :-\
I know enough about the U1272A to be able to say sensible things about it and its brethren OLED version. It's a good meter, though the 87V is a bit quicker in most cases. The Keysight meters have more options and should be a bit more versatile. They even speak SCPI. I like the dual display capabilities that often reduce the cognitive load.

I think the reports are that the displays haven't been too durable on the OLED models.
 

Online Mr. Scram

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Re: Keysight handheld meters pro's and con's?
« Reply #12 on: September 01, 2018, 11:35:52 pm »
Anyone have or know of the U1273A?

Been eying this model up!  :-\
I know enough about the U1272A to be able to say sensible things about it and its brethren OLED version. It's a good meter, though the 87V is a bit quicker in most cases. The Keysight meters have more options and should be a bit more versatile. They even speak SCPI. I like the dual display capabilities that often reduce the cognitive load.

I think the reports are that the displays haven't been too durable on the OLED models.
 

Offline bitseeker

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Re: Keysight handheld meters pro's and con's?
« Reply #13 on: September 02, 2018, 01:25:19 am »
Anyone have or know of the U1273A?

Been eying this model up!  :-\

The main issue with OLED displays in Keysight DMMs is life expectancy. Some have been pretty bad, going dim whether or not they're used. Also, although OLED has awesome contrast, it's difficult to impossible to see outdoors. All of my U12xx are LCD for better overall visibility, long life, and longer runtime.
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Offline Terry01

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Re: Keysight handheld meters pro's and con's?
« Reply #14 on: September 02, 2018, 01:34:34 am »
Anyone have or know of the U1273A?

Been eying this model up!  :-\
I know enough about the U1272A to be able to say sensible things about it and its brethren OLED version. It's a good meter, though the 87V is a bit quicker in most cases. The Keysight meters have more options and should be a bit more versatile. They even speak SCPI. I like the dual display capabilities that often reduce the cognitive load.

I think the reports are that the displays haven't been too durable on the OLED models.

That's great information to have before chucking a few quids at one of these meters. If the display goes that will always end up a bad day out. Day ruined!!  >:(
I did also think about the 87v a couple of weeks ago but i'm so glad someone pointed out it would give me no more functions than i already have. I think the Keysight meters offer something different for sure so worth having on your bench just for that.

That's another thing i can take into account when buying another meter,,,, my meters have a very easy lazy life chilling out on my bench with light work loads! No stuffed in a bag or tool box then humphed all over the place for my meters! No working in dirty harsh conditions either!  8)
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Offline Terry01

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Re: Keysight handheld meters pro's and con's?
« Reply #15 on: September 02, 2018, 01:37:31 am »
Anyone have or know of the U1273A?

Been eying this model up!  :-\

The main issue with OLED displays in Keysight DMMs is life expectancy. Some have been pretty bad, going dim whether or not they're used. Also, although OLED has awesome contrast, it's difficult to impossible to see outdoors. All of my U12xx are LCD for better overall visibility, long life, and longer runtime.

There's a thing. Runtime! Does the OLED chew more battery life to the point of being a deal breaker?
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Offline bitseeker

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Re: Keysight handheld meters pro's and con's?
« Reply #16 on: September 02, 2018, 02:59:15 am »
Depends what you consider a deal breaker. From the specs, using four AAA batteries:

U1272A: 300 hrs
U1273A:  60 hrs

5X higher energy consumption. 60 hours is still a while, so it just depends on your requirements.

The situation is much more dramatic on the U125x series since the 9V NiMH has much lower capacity to begin with:

U1252B: 30 hrs
U1253B:  8 hrs

8 hours is just way too short.
« Last Edit: September 02, 2018, 03:12:16 am by bitseeker »
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Offline Terry01

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Re: Keysight handheld meters pro's and con's?
« Reply #17 on: September 02, 2018, 03:30:36 am »
Oh yes 8 hrs is serious, even I couldn't live with that! 60 I could probably live with. All the stuff I do is totally hobby orientated so just an hour or 2 here and there when it takes my fancy, no heavy all day use at all.
I'm still on my first set I put in my 289 which is said to be very battery hungry and I find I can live with battery consumption in that no problems.
I shouldn't have just said that , should I?
Better get 6 new AA's looked out! Murphy's law will get you near every time! If Murphy doesn't,,,, "sods law" is waiting!! 
I fit all my meters out with lithium too so don't know exactly how much that helps. Still on my first set in all my meters!  ;D
« Last Edit: September 02, 2018, 04:06:40 am by Terry01 »
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Offline ejeffrey

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Re: Keysight handheld meters pro's and con's?
« Reply #18 on: September 02, 2018, 04:04:35 am »
Quote
I fit all my meters out with lithium too so don't know exactly how much that helps

That won't be a big help.  Lithium primary cells do have more capacity than alkaline cells but not by that much.  For instance, a energizer ultimate 9V is rated at 750 mAh vs 600 mAh for a standard alkaline 9V.  Not really worth the difference in price.

The places where lithium batteries shine are either very low power applications where you can take advantage of the 10-20 year shelf life or very high draw applications where the internal resistance of other chemistries limits performance.  This is why lithium batteries are commonly used in sealed battery smoke detectors and camera flashes.
 

Offline Terry01

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Re: Keysight handheld meters pro's and con's?
« Reply #19 on: September 02, 2018, 04:44:17 am »
I just had a quick squint at a few data sheets and i'm happy with the extras you get from lithium. I think it's a bit more than that.
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Offline VK5RC

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Re: Keysight handheld meters pro's and con's?
« Reply #20 on: September 02, 2018, 10:41:59 am »
Rather bizarrely the 'short life' on the U1253B rechargeable hasn't been an issue for me, I generally switch off HH DMMs between uses. 8 hours of actual use is a very long time of ~1 minute measurements for me. If I am using a DMM all day I would use one of the bench DMMs. (TEA - don't ask how many :palm:)
You don't have to open the back to recharge. The switch on the u1253B is, I think,  a better feel than the U1282 but it doesn't have the water ingress protection - if you need that.
I have a 8yr old U1253b and it hasn't faded yet - I tend to be a bit precious re my gear but we also don't get a lot of hot humid days here. It is stored in a shack which during summer in the internal temps get to high 20s low 30s but relative humidity is very low on those days. The photo below of the U 1253B display is on the 'low' intensity setting but inside.
I thought I would shoot a few comparison photos re the displays - it why I reach for the U1253B 1st.  :blah:
Note some of the angles aren't consistent between all meters but it gives a rough indication.
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Offline nanofrog

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Re: Keysight handheld meters pro's and con's?
« Reply #21 on: September 02, 2018, 11:36:13 am »
Another U1252B owner.

Very nice meter for electronics work IME. In regard to OLED models, I'd suggest skipping them due to the lifespan issues and decreased battery life.

I find using a separate battery charger (NiMH or lithium) and just swap in a freshly charged battery/ies when needed is preferable to using the meter to charge its battery/ies. Gets you back up and running inside of a minute.  ;)
 

Offline Terry01

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Re: Keysight handheld meters pro's and con's?
« Reply #22 on: September 02, 2018, 12:08:10 pm »
I think if I were to go get the OLED model, the screen would get as easy a life as an OLED screen could get with my light usage!
I also switch my meters "off" between measurements unless i'm testing something or whatever and taking a measure every 10-30 seconds or something like that, then i'll just leave it switched on.
I also don't use 1 meter every time/day I get my electronics stuff out, I like to use all my meters so that coupled with being a light user from day to day means all my  meters get an easy life.
I also like to look after my stuff, different I know if it's just a "work tool" tossed in a bag/box of other tools!
I suppose too I could end up with a meter with a "crap OLED screen" anyways so no matter how little I use it, it will crap out on me regardless!
Then there is the flipside of that too, I may end up with one OLED that lasts for ever.
I am noticing that it seems "as per", everyone is different. Some have a "last for ever" story, and others a "crapped out on me" story so as others have said,,, YMMV!

It's great that there is such a wealth of knowledge and experience here, you really get an all round perspective on things! Handy when ready to lay out a wad of quids!  :-+
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Offline nanofrog

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Re: Keysight handheld meters pro's and con's?
« Reply #23 on: September 02, 2018, 01:05:26 pm »
I think if I were to go get the OLED model, the screen would get as easy a life as an OLED screen could get with my light usage!

It's great that there is such a wealth of knowledge and experience here, you really get an all round perspective on things! Handy when ready to lay out a wad of quids!  :-+
I've seen posts by others that also had very light usage on their OLED models, and the screens still died on them within a few years (OLED decays whether it's powered or not).  :--

Better to get an LCD model and keep it around for a couple of decades or more IMHO (better value for your money). And it's a bit less expensive too.  >:D
 

Online rsjsouza

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Re: Keysight handheld meters pro's and con's?
« Reply #24 on: September 02, 2018, 02:33:54 pm »
I own a U1273A and a U1282A and had owned a U1233A. I haven't used the U1233A enough to have a strong opinion other than its size and packed features are a very nice feature. I tend to prefer the U1273A but the U1282A has its uses.

Leeching off bitseeker's excellent response, I have the following addenduns:
(I may be forgetting a few things)

U1273A:
- OLED display. The most controversial factor of this meter. Unbeatable indoors legibility and, if used in dark conditions, you will never be caught with a dark display (due to backlight timeout) while trying to evaluate the best places to put the probes. Its durability is unknown and various reports around this forum are concentrated on the previous model U1253 (only one or two concerned this model). Mine still works after 4~5 years of manufacturing (about 1-1/2 years of moderate use of about 1 hour per day). Threads here, here, here and here (there may be others).
- Decent speed autorange.
- Frequency measurements do not require the signal to have zero crossing - good for signals with  DC offset. (common to U127x/U128x)
- Various hold mechanisms (common to U127x/U128x), including a trigger (like an oscilloscope) and Auto hold.
- Built-in data logging with different trigger modes - the one I use the most is the event trigger, which allows to log only when a stable input is detected. (common to U127x/U128x)
- Low impedance ACV/DCV mode for eliminating ghost voltages (LoZ). Since in the bench I use several boards and power supplies and host PCs interconnected, this mode is quite useful to detect wide ground variations in unknown conditions. Lowest voltage difference is 3VAC - here
- Can compensate for DC offset voltages when measuring resistance (smart ohms). I personally have seen myself using this mode more than I initially believed during my repairs around the house on HVAC, heater and other permanent installations.
- Good capacitance meter with excellent range: up to 33mF. Slow on auto-range, especially on higher ranges (somewhat expected).
- 3V Diode checker that tests in both directions so you don't have to swap the leads.
- Beep can only be fully disabled or fully enabled. No sensible settings to disable the turn on beep.
- Continuity tester has a very interesting melody setting. A gimmick.
- Uses AAA batteries (common to U127x/U128x). Not a big fan due to the fear of leakage, but this meter sees quite a bit of action and the batteries usually are replaced every 6~8 months with my use.
- Very well built and a bit tall for my taste, but it has good rotary switch and terminal jacks. The various buttons with the number of aggregated functions not always make much sense - I sometimes see myself pressing a number of buttons until I get what I want or just need to go back to the previous display.
- I love its leads (Dave dislikes them due to length) as they have banana jacks on both sides. Easy to plug accessories.
- Earlier versions, like mine, were sensitive to high-frequency RF on the input jacks that could alter the displayed value.

U1282A:
- LCD Display. Excellent size and quite clear.
- Its biggest drawback to me is the slow autorange.
- Frequency measurements do not require the signal to have zero crossing - good for signals with  DC offset. (common to U127x/U128x)
- Various hold mechanisms (common to U127x/U128x), including a trigger (like an oscilloscope) and Auto hold. However, on this meter the switch between the different auto-hold modes only via a setup menu - the U127x cycles as you press the button. To me this detracts from the functionality.
- Built-in data logging with different trigger modes - the one I use the most is the event trigger, which allows to log only when a stable input is detected. (common to U127x/U128x). Other modes are manual and timed - quite useful as well.
- It has NCV with configurable sensitivity settings. Despite this, I find this NCV still too sensitive for reasonable use. I prefer to use my Fluke LVD2 that is a spot tester.
- Good capacitance meter with excellent range: up to 100mF. Slow on auto-range, especially on higher ranges (somewhat expected).
- It has square wave output with configurable duty cycle and frequency. Since the frequency is only switchable on the setup menu, it is somewhat cumbersome to use for my taste.
- It has an input for remote control to perform manual hold of measurements. Perhaps it has its uses for others, but I haven't seen the need to purchase its accessory.
- 3V Diode checker. Lacks the auto-diode feature of the U127x that I like.
- Beep can be disabled more sensibly than U127x - either disable the turn on beep (leaving continuity beep still on) or disable everything. 
- Uses AAA batteries (common to U127x/U128x). Not a big fan due to the fear of leakage, especially because one of its big advertisements is the very long battery endurance. Better check them constantly.
- Very well built and large meter that can easily act as a weapon. It has rubbery feel rotary switch (if that is an issue or not it is a highly personal matter). The various buttons with the number of aggregated functions not always make much sense - I sometimes see myself pressing a number of buttons until I get what I want or just need to go back to the previous display. IP67 rated, but mine only sees action on the lab.
- Decent leads but do not allow plugging accessories.
- Came with USB accessory for firmware updating and data logging. A big plus to me.
- Did not come with the temperature probe. A fail in my opinion.
- Not plagued by high-frequency RF problem of the early U127x modes.

Interesting clips about autorange comparison and the melody setting (shameless plug)
Melody continuity:


Autorange comparison:



I currently have the models shown below and will list some of the interesting or different features. Check the docs for details, of course. I really like the fast sampling/update rates of their meters. All three will work with the same USB or Bluetooth remote logging interfaces. They all have excellent, evenly lit backlights.

U1272A: LCD display. Dual 33,000 counts. Auto hold. Built-in data logging. Has low impedance ACV/DCV mode for eliminating ghost voltages. Can compensate for DC offset voltages when measuring resistance. Also has a diode checker that tests in both directions so you don't have to swap the leads. Uses AAA batteries (300 hours). Almost identical in size to the U1252B, but its concave sides make it feel slimmer in the hand (better for those with smaller hands). Earlier versions, like mine, were sensitive to high-frequency RF on the input jacks that could alter the displayed value.

U1282A: This is like an upgraded/enhanced U1252B. LCD Display. Dual 66,000 counts. IP67 rated. Auto hold. Low-frequency square wave generator (0.5 – 4800 Hz) with adjustable duty cycle. Built-in data logging. Measures % of 4 – 20 mA or 0 – 20 mA for industrial current loop transmitter output. Non-contact AC voltage detection. Remote hold (optional probe required). Includes the USB logging interface cable. Uses AA batteries (800 hours). Large case, longer than the U1252B and U1272A plus additional protective protrusions (i.e., it's a big DMM and heavier than the other two).

For me, the U1252B is a great all-around DMM. For electronics, it retains full resolution to 5V whereas the U1272A drops a decimal place above approximately 3V. The signal generator is also handy for checking out used equipment at auction houses (e.g., frequency counters, oscilloscopes, and the like; however, it'd be nice if it went up to a few MHz).

The U1272A's LoZ mode is nice for electrical work. The diode tester is convenient for electronics. I haven't taken advantage of the auto DC offset compensation in resistance mode, but it's a neat idea.

The U1282A's NCV function is a nice addition and the rest being like the U1252B would make this my go-to meter, but its size and weight make it less handy to take around. So, it lives most of its life as a bench DMM.

« Last Edit: September 02, 2018, 02:38:04 pm by rsjsouza »
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