Author Topic: pNeutron Ventilator No Electricity NO Electronics (BNC on back panel)  (Read 264 times)

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Offline SuzyC

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https://youtu.be/dCIRfV6I95Q
 Watch  at 2min 9-secs "no electronics, no electricity, no battery"

Back Panel shows ordinary BNC electrical connector for remote alarm.


AIRON
https://aironusa.com/products/ventilation/pneuton-model-a-ventilator/

To be mass-produced ASAP by major auto mfg. to save thousand of lives!

pNeuton model A is a Transport Ventilator with Built-In CPAP for Hospital Environments

The pNeuton model A with built-in CPAP (Continuous Positive Airway Pressure) is ideal for critical care adult or pediatric patient support in hospital environments.

With simple-to-use controls – Tidal Volume, Respiratory Rate, and Pressure Limit – pNeuton A can provide volume-targeted or pressure-limited ventilation. The built-in high output demand flow CPAP system insures critical care ventilation needs are optimized for spontaneous and mandatory breaths.

One Device for OR, ICU, MRI, and More

Fully pneumatic and operates without the need of batteries or electrical power, the pNeuton A can help you care for the most difficult patients, from the emergency room to special procedures, MRI to the operating room and intensive care unit, wherever the patient may be located.

The pNeuton A Ventilator has an integrated all-pneumatic alarm system with remote alarm capability that keeps you alerted to patient circuit disconnects and low gas supply from bedside to MRI observation room and back to the patient bedside.

Noninvasive or invasive ventilation broadens the clinical application and prepares the clinician to meet patient needs during transport.

The pNeuton ventilators/CPAP systems are critical care devices designed for use by healthcare professionals under the direction of a physician or healthcare provider.
Ventilation
« Last Edit: April 04, 2020, 05:47:51 pm by SuzyC »
 

Offline Domagoj T

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Re: pNeutron Ventilator No Electricity NO Electronics (BNC on back panel)
« Reply #1 on: April 04, 2020, 05:33:05 pm »
Sounds like it has a whole bunch of complicated pneumatics inside.
Not something suitable for homebrewing.
 

Online jogri

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Re: pNeutron Ventilator No Electricity NO Electronics (BNC on back panel)
« Reply #2 on: April 04, 2020, 05:59:25 pm »
Nothing new, Dräger has built such systems in the 80ies... They are extremely complex, just look at the inside of this unit someone posted in the repair section:

https://www.eevblog.com/forum/repair/ventilator-repair-drager-pulmolog/

I heavily doubt that a car manufacturer can suddenly reproduce this as they would need to manufacture extremely precise, airtight valves... Nothing even close to their normal business as they just don't have to deal with such high precision parts (okay, apart from the engine), get nearly everything supplied by a third party, don't have any of the necessary machines to produce those parts and don't have production lines for things smaller than a Mini Cooper.

I can only see one situation where such a device would be far better than a electronic ventilator: If you have to use it next to a running MRI and you can't use long tubes for whatever reason.
 

Offline SuzyC

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Re: pNeutron Ventilator No Electricity NO Electronics (BNC on back panel)
« Reply #3 on: April 04, 2020, 06:16:51 pm »
Jogri:

https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/ford-and-gm-are-undertaking-a-warlike-effort-to-produce-ventilators-it-may-fall-short-and-come-too-late/ar-BB12acKh?li=BBnb7Kz


Ford  will do it.
----------GE Healthcare got a call from an advisory firm representing Airon, which was exploring a sale or strategic partnership because the company’s 70-year-old owner did not have a natural successor. Akel Akel, the GE unit’s managing director for strategy and corporate development, suggested Airon speak with Ford about mass producing its ventilator in a Ford factory.

On March 26, a Ford manufacturing employee showed up at Airon’s factory in Melbourne, Fla., to learn how the ventilators were made. Airon also shipped a pNeuton Model A to Ford’s Michigan headquarters, where it was received by 10 p.m. that night. The next morning a team of engineers took it apart.

Within just a few days, roughly a dozen phone calls took place between Ford and Airon to discuss how the device works, how to build it and how to get enough component parts to make it, said Dave Sheppard, co-founder of MedWorld Advisors, which had been retained by Airon to explore a sale or strategic partnership. “I was really impressed with the Ford team.”\

......Ford has been outfitting its Rawsonville battery plant outside of Detroit, which is serviced by the Local 898 United Auto Workers union. That union is known for “skilled tradesmen” capable of quickly adapting the factory floor for new products. Since at least Wednesday, those workers have been changing its conveyor system, modifying tools and other equipment to make ventilators.
« Last Edit: April 04, 2020, 06:22:46 pm by SuzyC »
 

Online jogri

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Re: pNeutron Ventilator No Electricity NO Electronics (BNC on back panel)
« Reply #4 on: April 04, 2020, 07:11:17 pm »
Ford  will do it.

The question is not if they will do it, but if they will get the production running fast enough to make a difference... Looks like they are repurposing their metal injection molding machines, but i still have doubts about their accuracy: They might be accurate enough to fabricate battery holders, but if you want airtight valves you have to machine every single part after it has been sintered and that takes quite a while (and i don't think that Ford has the capability to do this at this plant as pressure valves for ventilators are way smaller than their usual parts).

They have to create the molds for the new parts (and those are expensive af), work out how to mold and machine them, get the produced machines tested for reliability and train their workers while having a fully running production line within the next two to three weeks... And even then they aim to produce around 1500 per month, that is roughly enough to supply 3-4k patients.

Can they produce ventilators? Sure. Will it make a difference? I have my doubts about that.
 


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