Author Topic: Looking inside a flown Soyuz space clock  (Read 1776 times)

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Offline eti

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Looking inside a flown Soyuz space clock
« on: December 07, 2019, 11:48:48 pm »
CuriousMarc, master of unique electronics videos, is at it again with this superb and beautiful find:

https://youtube.com/watch?v=JBIhzEZkWEA
« Last Edit: December 07, 2019, 11:53:53 pm by eti »
 
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Offline SiliconWizard

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Re: Looking inside a flown Soyuz space clock
« Reply #1 on: December 08, 2019, 12:59:04 am »
Nice.
 

Offline Bud

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Re: Looking inside a flown Soyuz space clock
« Reply #2 on: December 08, 2019, 02:20:41 am »
This gear would have been a nice complimentary item to the Apollo-Soyuz model at the Smithsonian. Too bad if it ends up in a bin after this guy will milk it for a video.
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Offline m98

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Re: Looking inside a flown Soyuz space clock
« Reply #3 on: December 08, 2019, 03:10:23 am »
If a museum was interested, they'd have bought it at the auction. What those guys are doing with their videos is far more valuable to the public than just putting it in a glass enclosure with a label on the side.
« Last Edit: December 08, 2019, 04:40:44 am by m98 »
 
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Online KE5FX

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Re: Looking inside a flown Soyuz space clock
« Reply #4 on: December 08, 2019, 03:14:48 am »
This gear would have been a nice complimentary item to the Apollo-Soyuz model at the Smithsonian. Too bad if it ends up in a bin after this guy will milk it for a video.

Maybe you should watch a few of his other videos.
 
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Offline Bud

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Re: Looking inside a flown Soyuz space clock
« Reply #5 on: December 08, 2019, 03:43:48 am »
If a museum was interested, they'd have bought it at the auction. What those guys doing with their videos is far more valuable to the public than just putting it in a glass enclosure with a label on the side.
Have you been to the Smithsonian Space museum? Do you realize how many people come there every day.
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Offline Bud

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Re: Looking inside a flown Soyuz space clock
« Reply #6 on: December 08, 2019, 03:46:37 am »
This gear would have been a nice complimentary item to the Apollo-Soyuz model at the Smithsonian. Too bad if it ends up in a bin after this guy will milk it for a video.

Maybe you should watch a few of his other videos.
May be you should save my time by keeping your cryptic messages to yourself.
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Offline eti

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Re: Looking inside a flown Soyuz space clock
« Reply #7 on: December 08, 2019, 04:11:02 am »
This gear would have been a nice complimentary item to the Apollo-Soyuz model at the Smithsonian. Too bad if it ends up in a bin after this guy will milk it for a video.

Erm, of all the YooToobaz in the world, I respect Marc as a man of great integrity and intelligence, and I wouldn't surmise that anything on his channel indicates that he is "milking" ANYTHING. He's allowed to make money you know, that's what our Mr Jones also does.

It is HIS property, but I highly doubt that he's the kind of person to just chuck out a very rare item. If you follow some of his videos, he and his team spend GIGANTIC amounts of time and effort, often many, many months, sourcing rare items, restoring them with FORENSICE LEVELS OF DETAIL AND CARE, and often donating them to museums (they do work for museums also).

Think first, then type.

 
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Offline eti

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Re: Looking inside a flown Soyuz space clock
« Reply #8 on: December 08, 2019, 04:11:58 am »
This gear would have been a nice complimentary item to the Apollo-Soyuz model at the Smithsonian. Too bad if it ends up in a bin after this guy will milk it for a video.

Maybe you should watch a few of his other videos.
May be you should save my time by keeping your cryptic messages to yourself.

Wow...  :palm:
 

Online wraper

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Re: Looking inside a flown Soyuz space clock
« Reply #9 on: December 08, 2019, 04:25:21 am »
This gear would have been a nice complimentary item to the Apollo-Soyuz model at the Smithsonian. Too bad if it ends up in a bin after this guy will milk it for a video.

Maybe you should watch a few of his other videos.
May be you should save my time by keeping your cryptic messages to yourself.
Maybe you start researching the subject instead of randomly accusing people of doing things? It's not only about this thread.
 
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Offline WastelandTek

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Re: Looking inside a flown Soyuz space clock
« Reply #10 on: December 08, 2019, 04:57:13 am »
This gear would have been a nice complimentary item to the Apollo-Soyuz model at the Smithsonian. Too bad if it ends up in a bin after this guy will milk it for a video.

Maybe you should watch a few of his other videos.
May be you should save my time by keeping your cryptic messages to yourself.

aren't we just full of ourselves
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Offline Red Squirrel

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Re: Looking inside a flown Soyuz space clock
« Reply #11 on: December 08, 2019, 09:21:27 am »
Wow that's really cool bit of kit.   Always been intrigued by USSR/Russian tech, there's just a certain charm to it.

It would be neat to hack one as an alarm clock, but that would be sacrilege.  :o   
 

Offline edy

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Re: Looking inside a flown Soyuz space clock
« Reply #12 on: December 09, 2019, 02:26:35 am »
Awesome video. I was just HOPING that I would see it operational... maybe feed it some voltage and see if anything comes on!  :)  Obviously they want to be careful with it, so they will try to get an idea of what is broken, what needs to be fixed, and whether it will run "on it's own". It must be really difficult to get any kind of schematics for these things. I can't wait to see it operational and powered on! That is one elegant bit of kit!
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Offline 0culus

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Re: Looking inside a flown Soyuz space clock
« Reply #13 on: December 09, 2019, 03:29:58 am »
This gear would have been a nice complimentary item to the Apollo-Soyuz model at the Smithsonian. Too bad if it ends up in a bin after this guy will milk it for a video.

Erm, of all the YooToobaz in the world, I respect Marc as a man of great integrity and intelligence, and I wouldn't surmise that anything on his channel indicates that he is "milking" ANYTHING. He's allowed to make money you know, that's what our Mr Jones also does.

It is HIS property, but I highly doubt that he's the kind of person to just chuck out a very rare item. If you follow some of his videos, he and his team spend GIGANTIC amounts of time and effort, often many, many months, sourcing rare items, restoring them with FORENSICE LEVELS OF DETAIL AND CARE, and often donating them to museums (they do work for museums also).

Think first, then type.

+1.

These are the same guys who got that Apollo Guidance Computer running again. That's gotta be one of the damn coolest playlists on all of youtube. Personally, I'd rather him having it than the museum, because when the Museum gets their grubby hands on stuff, any restoration work will almost certainly be done mostly outside the public eye, and probably not with a view to making it work again.

The Air and Space Museum is great, don't get me wrong. Been many times and it doesn't get old. But sometimes other venues are also appropriate for appreciating history.
 

Offline floobydust

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Re: Looking inside a flown Soyuz space clock
« Reply #14 on: December 09, 2019, 04:49:20 am »
Any guesses for the IC technology? RTL/DTL?  There's so many IC's and a huge power supply with toroid transformers having more windings than I've ever seen.
 

Online wraper

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Re: Looking inside a flown Soyuz space clock
« Reply #15 on: December 09, 2019, 11:04:00 am »
It's all TTL. 133 series is a clone of SN54xx. 134 series SN54L. 514ИД2 led driver has no western counterpart.
 

Offline richnormand

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Re: Looking inside a flown Soyuz space clock
« Reply #16 on: December 09, 2019, 09:08:31 pm »
Hope they post a follow up video if they manage to power it.
REPAIR, RENEW, REUSE, RECYCLE, REBUILD, REDUCE, RECOVER, REPURPOSE, RESTORE....
 

Online janoc

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Re: Looking inside a flown Soyuz space clock
« Reply #17 on: December 09, 2019, 09:30:45 pm »
Also I am pretty sure Smithonian has a clock like this already - they have several flown Soyuz capsules, AFAIK. Flown Soyuz TM hardware is not exactly that rare, given how many of those capsules have been made and used.
 

Offline floobydust

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Re: Looking inside a flown Soyuz space clock
« Reply #18 on: December 09, 2019, 10:46:56 pm »
It's all TTL. 133 series is a clone of SN54xx. 134 series SN54L. 514ИД2 led driver has no western counterpart.
The IC count seems high, I see a sandwich of 8 boards and about 135 of 14-pin IC's total in the logic sections. For a six digit clock with count down timer? That's why I thought small-scale integration, few gates per IC. No 7490 similar part but maybe 7447 like for the LED driver.
Have to see it running, if it's a state-machine and why so many I/O pins on the main connector.
I think it's more than a clock.
 

Offline duak

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Re: Looking inside a flown Soyuz space clock
« Reply #19 on: December 10, 2019, 05:54:46 am »
Neat stuff!  I like the little switch guards.  I designed a piece of equipment that flew in aircraft (not space) and I used U shaped handles to prevent some lever switches from being thrown accidently.  Not as spiffy as some special hardware but it worked; it just didn't have the aerospace 'look'.

I don't know what all the functions of this chrono-gizmo are so I'm just throwing out some chip counts If I had to do this in 1975:

Timebase block:
 7 = 1 Hz from 1 MHz needs 6 decade counters & a mux to select input source for clock & timer,

Current time block:
 8 = 6 decade counters + 2 logic to preset counters to correct time and handle 24 hours

Countdown timer block:
 6 = 4 decade counters + 2 logic to preset counters

Display block:
 10 decoder drivers

I/O receivers and transmitters, maybe RS-422?

Switch debouncing

Power supply

This would put the chip count in the mid 30's.  If there were special functions like external preloading of values, generation of time code blocks for other equipment, multiple times or mission day count, it could increase the count considerably because of adding muxes or busses.  Also, space stuff generally needs rad-hardened chips which may limit the selection.  A state machine with a RAM might be interesting, but it may not be available.  Even some MSI like a decade counter could be a problem.

« Last Edit: December 10, 2019, 06:03:02 am by duak »
 

Offline WastelandTek

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Re: Looking inside a flown Soyuz space clock
« Reply #20 on: January 23, 2020, 01:58:41 pm »
episode 2 dropped a couple days ago

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Offline darrellg

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Re: Looking inside a flown Soyuz space clock
« Reply #21 on: January 23, 2020, 11:39:29 pm »
 

Offline free_electron

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Re: Looking inside a flown Soyuz space clock
« Reply #22 on: January 24, 2020, 12:09:04 am »
This gear would have been a nice complimentary item to the Apollo-Soyuz model at the Smithsonian. Too bad if it ends up in a bin after this guy will milk it for a video.
Knowing Marc , it will get a nice place in his house , next to the IBM360 control panel .
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Any comments, or points of view expressed, are my own and not endorsed , induced or compensated by my employer(s).
 

Offline WastelandTek

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Re: Looking inside a flown Soyuz space clock
« Reply #23 on: February 16, 2020, 05:55:33 am »
They got it powered up

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Offline floobydust

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Re: Looking inside a flown Soyuz space clock
« Reply #24 on: February 16, 2020, 08:23:51 am »
I'm amazed it survived all the rough handling and mis-wiring, including non-ESD latex gloves that made me cringe. But Soyuz strong comrade. Glad it turned out OK.
So... the aux timer is likely for burn time?

Amazing that this 45 year old tech beats Boeing's Starliner solution. The $410M Boeing allocated to do a re-launch could include making another one of these...
 

Online wraper

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Re: Looking inside a flown Soyuz space clock
« Reply #25 on: February 16, 2020, 12:06:40 pm »
I'm amazed it survived all the rough handling and mis-wiring, including non-ESD latex gloves that made me cringe.
It's TTL, not CMOS. And CMOS normally would not be killed either.
 


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