Author Topic: Microsoft teaming up with Qualcomm to bring windows10/x86 to arm  (Read 6849 times)

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Offline BBBbbb

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Re: Microsoft teaming up with Qualcomm to bring windows10/x86 to arm
« Reply #25 on: December 12, 2016, 09:06:27 pm »
I had my Fedora brick a month ago, after/during an update, and I never had that with Win. I've just downloaded Mint to give it a go and replace bricked Fedora.
I'm not saying this is a general rule, just pointing out that Linux is not so stable as perceived. I'd rather say it is in more experienced hands than Win, therefore, less bad experience from users.
I can easily see why an engineer would prefer Linux to Windows, but you often come across no Linux alternatives to some good SW available only to Win users.

MS seems to get every second iteration of Windows right, so that's how I'm using it. I've been using win10 for about a year now and I like it generally. It has some bloatware, but it is practically plug and play for 90% of hardware, even for more specific USB to something adapters (from mainstream to Chinese chips).
It is an OS primarily for general public, not superusers, and beats everything else in that segment. Additionally there is a lot of legacy MS needs to carry from OS to OS, and it is not an easy task and cripples development.


On topic (MS to arm):
IMO if this is somewhat successful project, it will bring a lot of good changes to the market. It could finally push Intel seriously out of their "fat margins" world into the competitive mobile segment, with no Atom bullshit anymore. As long as MS is keeping them in a position to have their markups high, they will not give a serious run at a mobile segment.
 
« Last Edit: December 12, 2016, 09:08:24 pm by BBBbbb »
 

Online nctnico

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Re: Microsoft teaming up with Qualcomm to bring windows10/x86 to arm
« Reply #26 on: December 12, 2016, 09:14:36 pm »
For the last two decades Debian has been working fine for me. It doesn't have the latest versions of the software but at least it has the stable versions.
There are small lies, big lies and then there is what is on the screen of your oscilloscope.
 

Offline hans

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Re: Microsoft teaming up with Qualcomm to bring windows10/x86 to arm
« Reply #27 on: December 13, 2016, 12:11:19 pm »
Windows != Linux. Both systems have other mindsets.
If you're not accustomed to it, you will likely complain about Linux.
If you're accustomed to it, you will likely complain about Windows.

Ubuntu Linux has many drivers baked inside the kernel, also many non-free ones. I only had to switch drivers for my NVIDIA graphics card to proprietary.
Windows OTOH moans about unsigned USB drivers for my own fr'king hardware, even it's simple like CDC, keyboard or mouse. It's annoying enough in W7 - don't even start about W8 or W10.

I've never been able to screw up the dpkg manager out of the ordinary. Only on a hard shutdown or hard abort of the install process. Which is something you never do, neither on Windows.
Why should a reboot fix this? What is magical about a reboot process that should clear up the mistake that just happened? On Windows this seems like the magical fix because it was confused, on Linux it should just lead to the same state prior to reboot. This makes systems more predictable, but it does mean you should get it properly fixed.

I am more happy with Linux than Windows because applications start from the CLI and maybe work up to a GUI. Namely, you can access almost all of the systems and tools functionality from the CLI. This is awesome for headless servers and scripts. Ever seen a script for automating a GUI? It's a horror show.


There is a better substitute for regedit on Linux. It's called /etc/ with configuration files and a text editor. Crapped your settings? Just place back the .bak file and restart the service.

And my personal favorite of Linux: if you run rm / ; it will warn you do you really want to do that? Sure let's do that.. add --no-preserve root.
And so it complies. It removes all your files, including on mounted partitions like harddrives, network drives and the UEFI BIOS if you had that mounted.

That sounds retarded. But it's merely the lack of understanding what the command really does and can affect, than the command being retarded. The command did what it has been told. It's like calling the garbage company to come and clean all your belongings (including your wedding rings and family photo books) from your house. I'm sure they will comply if you tell them '--no-preserve-root' too.
 

Online nctnico

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Re: Microsoft teaming up with Qualcomm to bring windows10/x86 to arm
« Reply #28 on: December 13, 2016, 12:48:39 pm »
And my personal favorite of Linux: if you run rm / ; it will warn you do you really want to do that? Sure let's do that.. add --no-preserve root.
I think I know why that is in there... About 2 decades ago an ISP I used to connect to internet was also very active in Linux development. At some point someone typed something like rm myname / (note the extra space!) which promptly deleted all files on the server which had all the homepages and ftp server.
There are small lies, big lies and then there is what is on the screen of your oscilloscope.
 


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