Author Topic: Need some quick advice on whether to buy a fluke scopemeter 99b series 2  (Read 10118 times)

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Offline skysurf76

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I am an electrical engineering student, and I tinker around with microcontrollers and I have a few projects going on, and after watching Dave's videos I have the compulsion to buy equipment.  On craigslist in my area I found a fluke scopemeter 99b series 2 for sale.  The guy wanted 300 but I offered 225 and he accepted and gave me his cell phone number.  I was wanting to go out on Sunday and see it and most likely buy it, then I became terrified when I realized I have no idea really about what I'm buying and realized I need some knowledgeable advice.

I currently only have a 30 dollar sears el' cheapo multimeter and I had my eye on a fluke 87 V because I want a "real" multimeter, and I figured with a fluke scopemeter, even if it is old, I would be getting a reliable fluke multimeter at least as good as an 87V with logging capabilities with an oscope to boot.

Buy, don't buy, what questions to ask when I get to the guys house, what to check on the meter, bad price, good price?

Thanks so much in advance to anyone taking the time to answer. :)

P.S. He said it was calibrated in March.  Should I ask for documentation?
 

Offline Richard W.

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Calibration is worthless without documentation!

If you calibrate a scope or a multimeter you only make a normative-actual value comparison on the calibraion document. A calibration doesn't change anything on your device!

calibration =|= alignment

You should check all buttons and the display. Maybe there are some dead pixels or dead columns/row
 

Offline saturation

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The 99b has a real time sampling rate of 25MS/s, so its usable frequency is 2.5 MHz, single shot.
Its basic DC accuracy is 0.5% and 2-3% in AC to about 20kHz; the 87V is 0.05% and 1% respectively.
It cannot measure amps without the optional probe, and even then its limited to the probe's capacity.
It is not CAT rated.

For $200 I'd buy a used 87V as it will last you a lifetime and its a modern instrument.  2.5MHz is fairly limited even if fairly low cost.




Best Wishes,

 Saturation
 

Offline qno

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A scopemeter is far more versatile than a DMM.
If you get the accessories like the probes and power supply I go for the scopemeter.
Why spend money I don't have on things I don't need to impress people I don't like?
 

Offline skysurf76

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The 99b has a real time sampling rate of 25MS/s, so its usable frequency is 2.5 MHz, single shot.
Its basic DC accuracy is 0.5% and 2-3% in AC to about 20kHz; the 87V is 0.05% and 1% respectively.
It cannot measure amps without the optional probe, and even then its limited to the probe's capacity.
It is not CAT rated.

For $200 I'd buy a used 87V as it will last you a lifetime and its a modern instrument.  2.5MHz is fairly limited even if fairly low cost.


Thanks a lot Saturation, that did it for me.  I decided to pass on the scopemeter.  After reading your post I did some more research and sure enough they just about had me with the 5 gigasample per second claim.  Thanks for pointing out the true bandwidth.  Additionally I had no idea the accuracy of the 87V was so much better.  I think I'll just keep looking for an 87V.
 

Offline saturation

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Good luck!

On eBay, buy it now 87V typically about $230, if you bid the lows are in the $160 and high in the $250.

http://cgi.ebay.com/FLUKE-87V-TRUE-RMS-MULTIMETER-/220814619419?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item336993b31b
Best Wishes,

 Saturation
 


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