Author Topic: Need help with an Translation  (Read 2102 times)

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Offline Lord of nothing

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Need help with an Translation
« on: December 19, 2017, 09:50:50 am »
I know the English Language is not perfect for defier different thinks.  :-//
I hope someone here can help me with the different types of Bus (Lines).

How to call an Bus who operate in an City who is not a City Bus? The Bus Type operate normally Regional and is normally not an Low floor.
Made in Japan, destroyed in Sulz im Wienerwald.
 
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Online mikeselectricstuff

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Re: Need help with an Translation
« Reply #1 on: December 19, 2017, 10:45:28 am »
Coach
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Offline Freelander

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Re: Need help with an Translation
« Reply #2 on: December 19, 2017, 11:06:59 am »
I know the English Language is not perfect for defier different thinks.  :-//
I hope someone here can help me with the different types of Bus (Lines).

How to call an Bus who operate in an City who is not a City Bus? The Bus Type operate normally Regional and is normally not an Low floor.

Can you find an image (on google maybe) of the type of bus you are describing ?. if you post the image it may help. 
It does sound like you are describing a 'Coach' - in English English (Real English) - (as opposed to 'US' English  :palm:  ;) -  US English is not 'really' English... :P)
 
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Online mikeselectricstuff

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Re: Need help with an Translation
« Reply #3 on: December 19, 2017, 11:15:10 am »
Google image search "coach" and "bus"
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Offline vk6zgo

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Re: Need help with an Translation
« Reply #4 on: December 19, 2017, 11:37:48 am »
I know the English Language is not perfect for defier different thinks.  :-//
I hope someone here can help me with the different types of Bus (Lines).

How to call an Bus who operate in an City who is not a City Bus? The Bus Type operate normally Regional and is normally not an Low floor.

Can you find an image (on google maybe) of the type of bus you are describing ?. if you post the image it may help. 
It does sound like you are describing a 'Coach' - in English English (Real English) - (as opposed to 'US' English  :palm:  ;) -  US English is not 'really' English... :P)

In Australian English, they are still just buses.
 
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Offline Rerouter

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Re: Need help with an Translation
« Reply #5 on: December 19, 2017, 11:42:16 am »
a low floor bus is generally for goverment runs or similar, where maximum occupancy per $ of vehicle is prefered, and are intended for short trip times, e.g. hop on - hop off,

A bus with center luggage bins is called a "Coach" as they are a modern equivalent of a "stage coach" they are built with more comfy seats and are intended to travel further distances.

There are also "mini-buses" that act like "Coaches", however they would not be called as such, E.g. a "Mitsubishi Rosa" they are intended to carry people for over an hour, but they are not as comfy a ride, and are more of a "Shuttle bus" intended to get people from A to B at minimal cost, as a smaller vehicle can park easier and costs less in fuel, at the expense of the comfort of the customer.

To summerise:
a low floor bus is intended for many short trips, where people getting in and out is the priority,
a raised floor coach with luggage bins is intended for long trips, where people comfort is the priority,
a shuttle bus / minibus is for moving the most people at the lowest cost.
 

Offline vk6zgo

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Re: Need help with an Translation
« Reply #6 on: December 19, 2017, 11:53:16 am »
a low floor bus is generally for goverment runs or similar, where maximum occupancy per $ of vehicle is prefered, and are intended for short trip times, e.g. hop on - hop off,

A bus with center luggage bins is called a "Coach" as they are a modern equivalent of a "stage coach" they are built with more comfy seats and are intended to travel further distances.

There are also "mini-buses" that act like "Coaches", however they would not be called as such, E.g. a "Mitsubishi Rosa" they are intended to carry people for over an hour, but they are not as comfy a ride, and are more of a "Shuttle bus" intended to get people from A to B at minimal cost, as a smaller vehicle can park easier and costs less in fuel, at the expense of the comfort of the customer.

To summerise:
a low floor bus is intended for many short trips, where people getting in and out is the priority,
a raised floor coach with luggage bins is intended for long trips, where people comfort is the priority,
a shuttle bus / minibus is for moving the most people at the lowest cost.

Perhaps I should change my comment to "in Western Australian English",as it seems "Eastern Staters" are more Brit oriented.

We used to use the term "Tourist Coach" for buses used for tourists, many years ago.
Long distance buses in WA, although they might meet your criteria, are just called "buses".
 

Offline Freelander

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Re: Need help with an Translation
« Reply #7 on: December 19, 2017, 12:04:11 pm »
a low floor bus is generally for goverment runs or similar, where maximum occupancy per $ of vehicle is prefered, and are intended for short trip times, e.g. hop on - hop off,

A bus with center luggage bins is called a "Coach" as they are a modern equivalent of a "stage coach" they are built with more comfy seats and are intended to travel further distances.

There are also "mini-buses" that act like "Coaches", however they would not be called as such, E.g. a "Mitsubishi Rosa" they are intended to carry people for over an hour, but they are not as comfy a ride, and are more of a "Shuttle bus" intended to get people from A to B at minimal cost, as a smaller vehicle can park easier and costs less in fuel, at the expense of the comfort of the customer.

To summerise:
a low floor bus is intended for many short trips, where people getting in and out is the priority,
a raised floor coach with luggage bins is intended for long trips, where people comfort is the priority,
a shuttle bus / minibus is for moving the most people at the lowest cost.
Don't forget the good old Double Decker as a type of bus  :) - probably the most famous type in the world.
 :)
 

Offline Freelander

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Re: Need help with an Translation
« Reply #8 on: December 19, 2017, 12:10:31 pm »
Some type of bus - (uk)

Minibus
Normal town / city bus
Coach
Double Decker


 

Offline Brumby

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Re: Need help with an Translation
« Reply #9 on: December 19, 2017, 01:25:28 pm »
a low floor bus is generally for goverment runs or similar, where maximum occupancy per $ of vehicle is prefered, and are intended for short trip times, e.g. hop on - hop off,

A bus with center luggage bins is called a "Coach" as they are a modern equivalent of a "stage coach" they are built with more comfy seats and are intended to travel further distances.

There are also "mini-buses" that act like "Coaches", however they would not be called as such, E.g. a "Mitsubishi Rosa" they are intended to carry people for over an hour, but they are not as comfy a ride, and are more of a "Shuttle bus" intended to get people from A to B at minimal cost, as a smaller vehicle can park easier and costs less in fuel, at the expense of the comfort of the customer.

To summerise:
a low floor bus is intended for many short trips, where people getting in and out is the priority,
a raised floor coach with luggage bins is intended for long trips, where people comfort is the priority,
a shuttle bus / minibus is for moving the most people at the lowest cost.

Perhaps I should change my comment to "in Western Australian English",as it seems "Eastern Staters" are more Brit oriented.

We used to use the term "Tourist Coach" for buses used for tourists, many years ago.
Long distance buses in WA, although they might meet your criteria, are just called "buses".

Yes.  It seems we in the east do make the distinction .... and if you want to offend the driver of a coach, ask him about his "bus".
 

Offline Lord of nothing

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Re: Need help with an Translation
« Reply #10 on: December 20, 2017, 01:25:20 pm »
(sry for the Image Size the are from Wikipedia)
We here in Vienna (and other bigger City Like Graz, Innsbruck,...) we have the City Bus:


 :-+ Citybus

The next Category are the low floor Bus who operate from bigger City to the Countryside but not inside the City.
(OMG this is the Bus Station where I live next to!!!! How the got into Wikipedia...  :o so if someone want visit me wait on the Bus Station until I arrive someday  :-DD):

The get Operated by "Postbus" a Separated Company from the former the Austria Railway.

The also use for the we called here "Ɯberland Verkehr" Bus Service on the Countryside (new!) non Barierfree Bus:


This Bus also get used for long Distance Bus Service with Transport network Tickets. Depend on the Line here could be a ~3h long Bus Ride and the Bus do not have an Toilet onboard.  :=\  :--


There are also Double Decker Bus in Service but only for a Handfull Service. The should have an Toilet but I am not sure about.
Made in Japan, destroyed in Sulz im Wienerwald.
 

Offline SeanB

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Re: Need help with an Translation
« Reply #11 on: December 20, 2017, 05:56:47 pm »
The intercity coaches generally ( depending on the operator) will have a toilet on board, but they all do have stops at fixed places for the passengers to get out, walk around and take care of that. However, the feature that differentiates a bus as short distance or long distance is the final drive ratio, as the city route buses are geared for best fuel economy at low speeds, and at highway speeds the fuel consumption is a lot higher than when in inner city streets with start stop traffic. The long distance buses ( often called a coach as well) are more optimised for best fuel economy at the rated speed limit on long roads, where they spend most of the time.

As an aside German tour buses are designed to have best fuel economy on an Autobahn at 140kph, and any bus that does not have that is almost automatically designated as a city bus, even if it is capable of Autobahn travel at 120kph, though there the engine will be operating well out of the green band of optimal revs and fuel consumption.

Here in south Africa the most common bus is a minibus, originally a Toyota E20, of which there are still a lot around, though now the standard is a Toyota Quantum, with a smattering of other Toyota 16 seaters around, a few Nissan 16 seaters, a number of MB sprinter van conversions, and the odd GWM and other Chinese "upside down toyota' copies. Then you get actual buses, almost all of them being 65 seaters, mostly Marcopolo, MB, Iveco, Scania and even a few VW ones. The city buses range from Leylands from 1970, all the way to luxury coaches that are assembled locally from a Brazilian made chassis.

There are 2 double decker buses around, old Leyland powered buses ( think old London double decker buses from the 1970's) used as tourist buses. They come past me every day in holiday season, and every weekend as well, with a cut off top to expose the passengers to the view. They had to put a cage there after an unfortunate accident involving a drunk passenger and a tree.
 

Offline Lord of nothing

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Re: Need help with an Translation
« Reply #12 on: December 26, 2017, 01:06:58 pm »
 ;D more idea?
Made in Japan, destroyed in Sulz im Wienerwald.
 

Offline vk6zgo

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Re: Need help with an Translation
« Reply #13 on: December 27, 2017, 12:41:20 am »
 

Offline Lord of nothing

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Re: Need help with an Translation
« Reply #14 on: October 22, 2018, 07:36:12 pm »
Hmm what is the best Translation for: "Kraftfahrlinienverkehr mit Omnibussen"?  :phew:
Made in Japan, destroyed in Sulz im Wienerwald.
 

Online tpowell1830

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Re: Need help with an Translation
« Reply #15 on: October 22, 2018, 08:24:20 pm »
Hmm what is the best Translation for: "Kraftfahrlinienverkehr mit Omnibussen"?  :phew:

Coach
PEACE===>T
 

Offline Circlotron

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Offline bsfeechannel

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Re: Need help with an Translation
« Reply #17 on: October 22, 2018, 10:48:07 pm »

How to call an Bus who operate in an City who is not a City Bus? The Bus Type operate normally Regional and is normally not an Low floor.

Intercity bus, long-distance bus, express bus, over-the-road bus, commercial bus, long-haul bus, highway bus.

Or coach.

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Intercity_bus_service
 

Online IanB

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Re: Need help with an Translation
« Reply #18 on: October 22, 2018, 11:03:15 pm »
;D more idea?

There are only so many words for "bus" or "coach" in English. We don't have the facility for inventing new words like you can in German.

For example, you can't have a word like "longdistanceintercityexpressluxurybus" in English  :)
I'm not an EE--what am I doing here?
 

Offline vk6zgo

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Re: Need help with an Translation
« Reply #19 on: October 23, 2018, 09:19:17 am »
 

Offline Gromitt

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Re: Need help with an Translation
« Reply #20 on: October 23, 2018, 11:01:44 am »
This is also real



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