Author Topic: IEEE Senior Membership  (Read 1375 times)

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Offline wn1fju

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Re: IEEE Senior Membership
« Reply #25 on: September 11, 2020, 01:37:09 am »
I co-authored a paper in an IEEE journal a few years ago.  As part of the submission, the IEEE requested a short biography.  I described my education as earning a BA in 1974, an MA in 1977 and a Ph.D in 1979.  When the paper appeared in the journal, they listed me as an IEEE Member in 1974, a Senior Member in 1977 and a Fellow in 1979.  Oops.  I guess that's one way to advance through the IEEE grades !!!
 

Offline EEVblog

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Re: IEEE Senior Membership
« Reply #26 on: September 11, 2020, 01:37:33 am »
But according to Engineers Australia LinkedIn website, they have over 100,000 members and 99663 followers. I would be interesting to find out how many practising electronics engineers are members.

That would be interesting, but I doubt they'd ever release that data.
 

Offline mawyatt

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Re: IEEE Senior Membership
« Reply #27 on: September 11, 2020, 01:28:36 pm »
Even with all the problems with the IEEE, it's still the best resource for State of the Art in electronics and semiconductor devices IMO. The technology papers in the journals and at various conferences are a glimpse 10~15 years into the future.

We've published a few papers (most of our advanced work could not be published), the most prestigious in the IEEE was an Invited paper appearing in the "Proceedings of the IEEE" 15 August 2005, "Smart Phased Array SoCs: A Novel Application for Advanced SiGe HBT BiCMOS Technology".

https://ieeexplore.ieee.org/abstract/document/1495911

This paper created a lot of interest in our company which was acquired the next year, so the IEEE was very helpful in this case.

Also agree it's expensive, since my company paid the subscription when I was employed being a member was a no-brainer. Now I've retired I decided to keep the membership and pay out of pocket since I'll qualify for a Life Membership next year ::) Think this means the IEEE knows I won't be member much longer :o

Best,
Research is like a treasure hunt, you don't know where to look or what you'll find!
~Mike
 

Offline Bud

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Re: IEEE Senior Membership
« Reply #28 on: September 11, 2020, 03:04:05 pm »
What is the point to publish a paper and have access to it locked , restricted to one single group in IEEE. The problem with IEEE is access to the materials, and by the way, the quality of materials is not always good.
Facebook-free life and Rigol-free shack.
 

Offline SiliconWizard

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Re: IEEE Senior Membership
« Reply #29 on: September 11, 2020, 04:34:24 pm »
I guess no one is an IEEE member  ;D
I am, but in the same position as you. Only member. I've also been thinking about "upping" my membership.
You could try and contact your local chapter for references.

No need. Turns out I already knew three personally, just had no idea they were IEEE senior members. There also seems to be no way to search the IEEE member database to check that status of someone?

Ok, cool.
No, I don't think there is - that's why I suggested contacting your chapter, as they should have been able to give you such a list. But if you already know 3 personally, you'll save a lot of time.
With these 3 and your background, your access to the Senior status should be pretty straightforward.
 

Offline rsjsouza

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Re: IEEE Senior Membership
« Reply #30 on: September 11, 2020, 05:04:57 pm »
I am a member of IEEE and see value in it, although in recent years the nature of my work did not demand the type of information they had - i kept renewing for my own interest. Now that I changed jobs with something more advanced than what I was doing, the usability of their work will be professionally more applicable.
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Offline EEVblog

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Re: IEEE Senior Membership
« Reply #31 on: September 11, 2020, 10:59:50 pm »
With these 3 and your background, your access to the Senior status should be pretty straightforward.

Should be. You just need the three references and 10 years of experience, with 5 years recent I think. So unless they somehow don't count the EEVblog as a "real engineering" job then should be straightforward.
 

Offline EEVblog

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Re: IEEE Senior Membership
« Reply #32 on: September 11, 2020, 11:01:15 pm »
What is the point to publish a paper and have access to it locked , restricted to one single group in IEEE. The problem with IEEE is access to the materials, and by the way, the quality of materials is not always good.

Do you somehow sign over copyright or sign an exclusive publishing deal?
If not, then why couldn't you just post the paper on your own site minus any IEEE references?
 

Offline Kerlin

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Re: IEEE Senior Membership
« Reply #33 on: September 11, 2020, 11:46:51 pm »
I guess no one is an IEEE member  ;D
Non degree Engineers with experience have become favored.
 

Offline mawyatt

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Re: IEEE Senior Membership
« Reply #34 on: September 16, 2020, 02:02:50 pm »
What is the point to publish a paper and have access to it locked , restricted to one single group in IEEE. The problem with IEEE is access to the materials, and by the way, the quality of materials is not always good.

It's not locked nor restricted access to a specific IEEE group, you can purchase papers if you are not an IEEE member I believe. I've included the IEEE referenced Invited Paper we did back in 2005 (actually dates back to a closed paper in 2000 when we proposed a wafer scale phased array SoC in IBM 7HP SiGe BiCMOS process for a USG agency, later we were allowed to discuss very limited aspects of such and thus the IEEE paper).

The electrical performance of the modern instruments we have are directly related to the advanced semiconductor chips inside. The performance per cost metric is outstanding IMO, from the advanced ADCs, DACs, Amplifiers, FPGAs, uPs, SoCs and so on have paved the way for these modest cost, high performance instruments, and they are compact.

These advanced chips can be traced back to advanced semiconductor processes and in some cases new type circuits and algorithms, all likely described in the past IEEE journals in some form.     

Please provide a reference for electronics related that has better quality material than the IEEE Journals, I'm not aware of anything in general.

Best,

« Last Edit: September 16, 2020, 04:09:08 pm by mawyatt »
Research is like a treasure hunt, you don't know where to look or what you'll find!
~Mike
 
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