Author Topic: Post a picture of the Tonga event, measured by your sensors  (Read 818 times)

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Offline branadic

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Post a picture of the Tonga event, measured by your sensors
« on: January 19, 2022, 07:30:18 am »
Hi,

I noticed a lot of articles from people measuring the compression wave created by the vulcano near Tonga.
Attached an image what we observed. Who else found this in his data and what sensor did you use?

See also:
https://www.rainer-gerhards.de/2022/01/druckwelle-des-vulkanausbruch-auf-tonga-im-main-tauber-kreis-messbar/
for comparison.

-branadic-
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Offline RoGeorge

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Re: Post a picture of the Tonga event, measured by your sensors
« Reply #1 on: January 19, 2022, 01:43:09 pm »
Nice!

I didn't know a volcano eruption can be registered as a slow oscillation in the atmospheric pressure all around the Earth.  :o

Quote
Why is the second spike in the graph going "down"?

I can't fully explain it either. My strongest guess is that it's the measurement interval, so it's just a distortion of the recording. Our station records everything for 5 minutes, which is perfectly adequate for normal weather conditions.
Source: Google translation of https://www.rainer-gerhards.de/2022/01/druckwelle-des-vulkanausbruch-auf-tonga-im-main-tauber-kreis-messbar/

That fragment gave the idea that maybe weather stations should use much faster recording intervals (unless the power budget for the sensors are very, very low, which is usually not the case).

Later, the data can be compressed for longer storage, and if lossless compression is not enough, when running out of storage space change the lossless compression into a lossy compression.  Since any weather variations are rather slow, the compression ratio is expected to be very good, so the amount of storage space won't increase much, while such unexpected events would be captured with better resolution.

Offline Neper

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Re: Post a picture of the Tonga event, measured by your sensors
« Reply #2 on: January 19, 2022, 02:08:26 pm »
Nothing spectacular but clearly visible:

https://the-real-fotoralf.blogspot.com/2022/01/bumm.html
 

Offline FireBird

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Re: Post a picture of the Tonga event, measured by your sensors
« Reply #3 on: January 19, 2022, 09:21:46 pm »
Here’s a picture of the data I’ve captured with a simple Bosch BME680 and a 1 minute sample rate.

[attach=1]
 
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Offline VK3DRB

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Re: Post a picture of the Tonga event, measured by your sensors
« Reply #4 on: January 20, 2022, 05:12:35 am »
Whoever engineered the data pipe from Tonga has no backup plan for critical communications infrastructure. If the Internet went down for a month due to a massive cyber attack by our enemy, there would be chaos because there is no backup to a lot of critical infrastructure.
 

Offline SeanB

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Re: Post a picture of the Tonga event, measured by your sensors
« Reply #5 on: January 20, 2022, 06:27:25 am »
Remember that when Krakatoa went off the pressure wave was recorded across the world in London, as pressure waves on recording instruments that were attached to gas supply gasometers. Also on other equipment, but the gasometers were recording that the pressure pulse travelled at least twice across the planet before it dissipated.
 

Offline Ed.Kloonk

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Re: Post a picture of the Tonga event, measured by your sensors
« Reply #6 on: January 20, 2022, 06:32:30 am »
Sorry. No data here.

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Offline mjs

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Re: Post a picture of the Tonga event, measured by your sensors
« Reply #7 on: January 21, 2022, 01:14:08 pm »
Here's an animation by Lauri Kangas, based on open data from meteorology:

https://www.avaruus.fi/fileadmin/avaruus.fi/2022/01/paineaallot_10fps.gif

It shows how the pressure wave coming around the Earth from two different directions!
 

Offline chukin

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Re: Post a picture of the Tonga event, measured by your sensors
« Reply #8 on: January 21, 2022, 03:59:31 pm »
Here's the same data logged not too far away from Austria - about 30km south of Zürich. Shows the direct and indirect pressure pulses pretty well, measured with a Vaisala industrial sensor (not sure of the exact type as I am not at work).
The resolution is about 0.1 mbar, sample interval 2 minutes.

The company I work for logs air pressure, humidity and temperature continuously - we make pressure and density sensors (amnong other stiff) which need to be corrected for air conditions.
 


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