Author Topic: Preventing glass from sliding on a surface  (Read 2978 times)

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Offline gnif

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Preventing glass from sliding on a surface
« on: March 24, 2017, 08:28:45 am »
I have a small glass device (I can not divulge what it is at this point, nor it's function sorry) that I need to prevent from sliding around on a smooth surface when it is touched/bumped, etc. I would like to keep the glass optically clear for aesthetic reasons, so I am looking for some kind of product that can be applied to the bottom of the glass to give it some friction (rubber feet are not an option, it needs to be in contact across it's entire surface for structural reasons).

The area in contact with the surface is roughly 250x250mm square and has nearly no mass to it. It needs to be able to be removed so a glue is of no use here, and it needs to be cleanable with soapy water. Is anyone aware of such a product? The first thing that comes to my mind is hair spray, but its not impervious to water, nor is it optically clear.

Whatever it is it also needs to be cheap, the final cost of the device needs to be kept down to be competitive and as such expensive materials need to be avoided.
« Last Edit: March 24, 2017, 09:06:05 am by gnif »
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Offline PointyOintment

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Re: Preventing glass from sliding on a surface
« Reply #1 on: March 24, 2017, 09:05:30 am »
s/devolve/divulge ?

Plasti-Dip? Cast polyurethane rubber?
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Offline gnif

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Re: Preventing glass from sliding on a surface
« Reply #2 on: March 24, 2017, 09:06:43 am »
s/devolve/divulge ?

Wow, my dyslexia really gets the better of me at times.
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Offline PointyOintment

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Re: Preventing glass from sliding on a surface
« Reply #3 on: March 24, 2017, 09:12:15 am »
Or cast silicone rubber. I don't know why that didn't come to mind the other minute. It might be harder to get optically clear, though, even if bubble-free. But that's just a guess; I'm not experienced with any of these materials.
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Offline yuzuha

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Re: Preventing glass from sliding on a surface
« Reply #4 on: March 24, 2017, 09:14:47 am »
thin layer of clear silicone rubber ?
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Offline evb149

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Re: Preventing glass from sliding on a surface
« Reply #5 on: March 24, 2017, 09:14:57 am »
Silicones can be clear like some caulks but can be applied as thin layers by various means.
 

Offline evb149

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Re: Preventing glass from sliding on a surface
« Reply #6 on: March 24, 2017, 09:17:21 am »
A thin layer of vinyl could also do it.  I'd favor the silicone though.
 

Offline Nusa

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Re: Preventing glass from sliding on a surface
« Reply #7 on: March 24, 2017, 09:18:46 am »
How thick can it be?

Clear plastic like those used for screen protectors on smartphones and tablets?

Clear plastic food wrap? Can't get much cheaper than that.
 

Offline Marco

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Re: Preventing glass from sliding on a surface
« Reply #8 on: March 24, 2017, 09:24:04 am »
There's removable transparent vinyl/pvc sheets for decals, maybe you could glue two of those together to make your own double sided clear sticky tape? (Which doesn't usually come in 250mm width.)

PS. on second thought it's only removable when you can peel it off, the adhesive is probably far too strong to get the device off by simply wrenching or levering it. This is going to be a problem for anything but the flimsiest of adhesives, for anything strong you'll need to get a long thin blade or steel wire under there to cut it off. Or use heat.
« Last Edit: March 24, 2017, 09:36:56 am by Marco »
 

Offline jpanhalt

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Re: Preventing glass from sliding on a surface
« Reply #9 on: March 24, 2017, 09:43:29 am »
It needs to be able to be removed so a glue is of no use here, and it needs to be cleanable with soapy water. Is anyone aware of such a product? The first thing that comes to my mind is hair spray, but its not impervious to water, nor is it optically clear.

Not quite sure the distinction you make between "glue" and an "adhesive" like hair spray. 

In any event, silicone rubber (as suggested) and thin elastomers as used to protect the faces of LCD's might be considered.  I would also consider a low-melting thermosetting plastic/adhesive or polyolefin (e.g., wax).  Shellac was used for centuries as a temporary, thermosetting adhesive.  But you can probably find a more desirable temperature range with modern "hot melts" or waxes (waxes can be used as temperature gauges and come with a variety of relatively low melting points up to several hundred degrees Celsius.

John
 

Offline gnif

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Re: Preventing glass from sliding on a surface
« Reply #10 on: March 24, 2017, 09:51:23 am »
It needs to be able to be removed so a glue is of no use here, and it needs to be cleanable with soapy water. Is anyone aware of such a product? The first thing that comes to my mind is hair spray, but its not impervious to water, nor is it optically clear.

Not quite sure the distinction you make between "glue" and an "adhesive" like hair spray. 

You're quite correct, I was thinking hairspray as to the apparent tackiness it has.

I think at this point the silicone rubber is the best option, it needs to conform somewhat as the surface it sits on may not be defect free.
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Offline jpanhalt

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Re: Preventing glass from sliding on a surface
« Reply #11 on: March 24, 2017, 10:01:41 am »
As a pad, silicone will be fine.   A drop of water or alcohol will improve adhesion.   Removal (if used as a monomer that you let polymerize in situ), could be difficult.   Thermosetting stuff -- even chicken fat -- avoids that removal problem.

Good luck.

John

edit: It the thickness of the silicone (or other rubber) allows it, a fine wire pulled underneath is a common way to cut or release the bond.
« Last Edit: March 24, 2017, 10:03:40 am by jpanhalt »
 

Offline Arjan Emm

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Re: Preventing glass from sliding on a surface
« Reply #12 on: March 24, 2017, 10:12:12 am »
To wich material do you want the glass to stick too? Maybe water glass, a saturated solution of sodium silicate, might do the job. It's water clear. Pretty sticky to start with. And as water evaporates becomes a solid. You can easy stick two sheets of glass together with it. Initially you will be able the slide the sheets, as water evaporates from the edges they become totally stuck in a day or so. So you end up with a water soluble solid connection at the edges and a clear liquid film in the middle. Over time water will evaporate from the middle too and will become opaque, this can take up to weeks to several months. getting them apart will also become progressively harder over time. The water glass is dirt cheap.
 

Offline gnif

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Re: Preventing glass from sliding on a surface
« Reply #13 on: March 24, 2017, 10:24:09 am »
Thanks but it doesn't need to adhere/stick, just prevent it from moving around if bumped, it has to be possible to pick it up, moved, cleaned, etc. The contacting surface is unknown, it could be anything from wood to glass.
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Offline Halcyon

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Re: Preventing glass from sliding on a surface
« Reply #14 on: March 24, 2017, 10:38:23 am »
I'm curious as to the device now. :-)
 

Offline Arjan Emm

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Re: Preventing glass from sliding on a surface
« Reply #15 on: March 24, 2017, 10:39:10 am »
okay, then just put a thin sheet of say 0.5mm latex between the glass and the secret layer. It will not slide if bumped and you can just take it off without cleaning.
 

Offline mrflibble

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Re: Preventing glass from sliding on a surface
« Reply #16 on: March 24, 2017, 11:51:13 am »
Silicone baking mat. Either just slap down the entire sheet on your work surface, or cut to size if your purpose requires that. Have several of those in different colors, useful for all manner of things. Well, except baking obviously. Why yes, please add random stuff from the Chinese bargain bin to my food. ::) I'd rather use a uranium glass baking tray thank you very much.


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Offline jm_araujo

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Re: Preventing glass from sliding on a surface
« Reply #17 on: March 24, 2017, 11:58:46 am »
I would go with "electrostatic film". It's sold for glass windows in a variety of styles, including clear.
It has a "rubbery" feel and I don't think it will slide easily on surfaces. As it adheres by electrostatic charge you can just peel it off without leaving any residue.
Use google to find a local supplier, in my country I can find it in home improvement stores.
 

Online edpalmer42

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Re: Preventing glass from sliding on a surface
« Reply #18 on: March 24, 2017, 04:14:50 pm »
If you cover the entire area with silicone or any other similar material, you could have a lot of trouble picking the item up.  It'll be like a suction cup.

I've never worked with them, but I've heard of 'gauge blocks' ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gauge_block ) which are solid steel blocks that are so flat and smooth that when you put them together, suction holds them together.  You don't need a flexible rubber cup shape to form a suction cup.

Ed
 

Online SeanB

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Re: Preventing glass from sliding on a surface
« Reply #19 on: March 25, 2017, 10:21:47 am »
How about a water clear epoxy, applied as a few drops to the glass, then either levelled by gravity or spin levelled in a small jig that rotates the glass to spead this in an even layer. Kind of like you do to coat a silicon wafer in manufacture, or coat a blank CD to get the protective top on it after stamping and metallising.
 

Offline German_EE

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Re: Preventing glass from sliding on a surface
« Reply #20 on: March 25, 2017, 03:51:16 pm »
Alternative 1, speak to 3M about the adhesive that they use on post-it pads.

Alternative 2, speak to a windscreen repair place, a couple of small dots of the stuff they use might be enough to solve your problem and it's optically clear
Should you find yourself in a chronically leaking boat, energy devoted to changing vessels is likely to be more productive than energy devoted to patching leaks.

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Offline PointyOintment

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Re: Preventing glass from sliding on a surface
« Reply #21 on: March 26, 2017, 07:07:39 am »
I've never worked with them, but I've heard of 'gauge blocks' ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gauge_block ) which are solid steel blocks that are so flat and smooth that when you put them together, suction holds them together.  You don't need a flexible rubber cup shape to form a suction cup.

Ed

You don't just put them together. You have to wring them together, even under vacuum, apparently. However, the flat suction cup effect may indeed be relevant in this application.
I refuse to use AD's LTspice or any other "free" software whose license agreement prohibits benchmarking it (which implies it's really bad) or publicly disclosing the existence of the agreement. Fortunately, I haven't agreed to that one, and those terms are public already.
 

Offline David Hess

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Re: Preventing glass from sliding on a surface
« Reply #22 on: March 26, 2017, 10:04:23 pm »
Clear vinyl film is available which is ideal for this purpose.  It is optically clear, deformable, and tacky enough to stick to glass and other surfaces.  It will easily prevent the glass from slipping but the glass can always be removed later.  There is also a silicon rubber equivalent.
 


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