Author Topic: Proof that software as service/cloud based, will never work for long term ...  (Read 10377 times)

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Online bd139

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I run real world companies in AWS and am AWS cert. I run my own company in AWS. My point is perfectly valid and it is exactly how a lot of companies operate that I have directly experienced.

Putting developers and admins in the same team I agree with. It's called devops. And I agree about capacity planning but your argument wasn't about capacity planning, which is a solved problem, but about bureaucracy and using AWS to leverage an advantage in that space.

The IT team, if not the business, are a service function of a business and usually poorly funded and invested in and seen as a parasitic annoyance. That's where all the problems start. The cloud isn't a solution there. You have to fix the perception and the humans first.
 

Offline GeorgeOfTheJungle

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4. Billing. Yeah lets roll out an instance we don't understand the costing of properly and get a nasty shock at the end of the billing cycle.

Been there, done that!
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Online bd139

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Me too  :-DD

My first "free tier" AWS bill was $300 because I stepped slightly off the path :palm:
 
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Offline madires

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As always, you have to figure out the pros and cons, and choose wisely. One benefit of cloud services is scalability as following example demonstrates: >:D
Sesame Street Store & Volusion customers are comprised; how the cookie monster is stealing credit card info.
https://blog.usejournal.com/sesame-street-volusion-customers-are-comprised-how-the-cookie-monster-is-stealing-cc-numbers-21eb51ec613b

Volusion uses Google's cloud to run over 6500 web shops. One hack and all shops are compromised.
 
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Online SiliconWizard

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Yes, cloud services scale up very well when it comes to hacking. ;D
 

Online hendorog

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I run real world companies in AWS and am AWS cert. I run my own company in AWS. My point is perfectly valid and it is exactly how a lot of companies operate that I have directly experienced.

Putting developers and admins in the same team I agree with. It's called devops. And I agree about capacity planning but your argument wasn't about capacity planning, which is a solved problem, but about bureaucracy and using AWS to leverage an advantage in that space.

The IT team, if not the business, are a service function of a business and usually poorly funded and invested in and seen as a parasitic annoyance. That's where all the problems start. The cloud isn't a solution there. You have to fix the perception and the humans first.

It sounds like we are on the same page. You are right, I was bundling DevOps in with the cloud model. Its just a smart way to get it done.


 
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Offline wnorcott

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And yet there still are people who are OK with eagle being moved to a subscription only system.  :palm:

I am grandfathered on an install-only version of Eagle and will be keeping that forever.  If my hard drive crashes, so be it.  That's what backups are for.
On very rare occasions, you might notice an odor or see a puff of smoke or sparks vent from your product.
 

Offline wnorcott

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Capitol One credit card company hosts their website on AWS and they got hacked by an Amazon insider, who managed to download personal and financial information of over 100 Million   Visa customers.   Think about that.   The fox is watching the chicken coop.

Lest you doubt the cloud merchants abuse their godlike powers, we are reading news stories daily that Alexa has Amazon employees on the other end eavesdropping on your private conversations inside your home.  Some even pay good money to have an Amazon doorbell that video records whoever is at your front door, so your visitors' comings and goings are on the cloud.
On very rare occasions, you might notice an odor or see a puff of smoke or sparks vent from your product.
 
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Online Red Squirrel

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Personally if I need to host something internet facing on someone else's server I rather keep it as raw as possible vs going with a "cloud" provider like AWS.  Ex: a dedicated box at OVH, Softlayer or other such company.   Ideally I'd love to host all that stuff at my house but ISPs always seem to have that archaic "no servers" rule.  Most also don't provide static IPs.  Without static IP you can't do DNS properly.  Using a 3rd party service like no-ip is a hack. 

I do hate that I have to rely on the 3rd party provider but as long as I stick with a basic setup nothing stops me from re-uploading my local/backup copy to another provider if I get the rug pulled from under me.  Also don't like "elastic pricing" schemes.  I want a predictable bill with no surprises.
 



Online bd139

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Actually no!  :palm: 

I shall go and put the dunce hat on and sit in the corner :-DD
 
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Offline VK3DRB

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Never been comfortable with cloud based software. Altium is going more to it, especially with Altium 20 and the online review process that can only work with a subscription. Good in a way because it makes the pirates pay, and Altium investors very rich (if they had bought shares in 2011). But bad in another way because Altium is overpriced for small businesses or occasional users. And over priced in that it still has bugs and you are paying for them to be fixed by suscrption. But hey, it would not be the Altium we have come to know and love it didnb't lock up occasionally or the that memory violation error (and the fragmented user interface) .

Another reason I don't like cloud based software, is you lack autonomy and to some extent freedom. The Chinese Communist Party could order their companies to block any users who do not worship the regime, from accessing cloud based software.

The third reason is cloud based software is open to hacking or DOS attacks.   

The fourth reason, is latency. Anyone who has had to endure Atlassian's Jira will know what I mean :=\.
 
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Online bd139

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Ooooh yes JIRA cloud is just cancer.
 

Online bd139

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Online SiliconWizard

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The whole base concept behind the "cloud" is to make software and data access a "commodity" such as water (or for most, electricity) distribution: make everyone depend on large-scale, official services, and even eventually forbid anyone to use "unauthorized" distribution channels, including your own. May very well happen someday with data.

Has it not worked for water in the long term? It unfortunately looks like it has. And I'm sure many people were very wary about water distribution at the time it began to be handled by states and later, private companies.

And the same arguments are provided: ease of access, safety... (before centralized distribution, water was very unsafe and a major vector of disease... we could argue the same now with data due to hacking, viruses, integrity, etc.)

« Last Edit: October 14, 2019, 03:44:11 pm by SiliconWizard »
 

Online bd139

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Totally. There was an article posted a couple of days ago that I can't find now about "the death of files" and the migration of everything to "services". I still like my files. In fact I'm in the process of killing Apple Music at the moment slowly and methodically.
 

Offline james_s

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There's only one form of water out there, same with electricity, it's the same stuff no matter who you buy it from. Software on the other hand comes in a huge variety and cloud based software cannot be relied on not to change in arbitrary ways. I avoid it as much as possible.
 

Online dunkemhigh

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Offline VK3DRB

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Totally. There was an article posted a couple of days ago that I can't find now about "the death of files" and the migration of everything to "services". I still like my files. In fact I'm in the process of killing Apple Music at the moment slowly and methodically.

I won't bother with Apple Music. No point. Apple's engineers and programmers lost the ability to design decent products long ago. It started with the iTunes. The cloud and local content failed due to a poor user interface sitting in front of bloatware. If they went total cloud-based, it would be a debacle. Now Apple fanboys with their white worms hanging out of their ears are discovering they have a battery life of about 2 years at best, and it is impossible to replace the battery.
 

Online bd139

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To be fair I just replaced the battery in a 6s  :-//. Took about five minutes. A blind monkey could do it.

The point is the software ecosystem is a ball and chain.
 

Offline james_s

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I think he's talking about the airpods which are not a product I'm a fan of. The iPhones I've had generally good experience with however I won't buy one with a notch in the screen. I really don't understand the obsession with an edge to edge screen at all costs.
 

Offline SilverSolder

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I think he's talking about the airpods which are not a product I'm a fan of. The iPhones I've had generally good experience with however I won't buy one with a notch in the screen. I really don't understand the obsession with an edge to edge screen at all costs.

Planned obsolescence - make things as fragile as possible, hard to replace wear parts (batteries, USB connectors, etc.), glass back as well as front just to ensure something breaks if dropped...   and of course, goad the majority into feeling important by replacing their phones every couple of years at a "reassuringly expensive" price...   The only place to be is a shareholder in that game!
 
 

Offline james_s

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I don't think they're deliberately planned to fail, I've had enough jobs at companies that made hardware to have seen that it's usually just a case of longevity/repairability simply not being one of the design criteria. In the case of the airpods I'd assume they are designed to be as compact as possible and waterproof, the cost of that is that the batteries are small and cannot be replaced. I wouldn't buy them but plenty of people do. *shrug* It's their money.
 
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Offline GeorgeOfTheJungle

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Now Apple fanboys with their white worms hanging out of their ears

 :-DD
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